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CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> |1
CAADence in Architecture
Back to command
International workshop and conference
16-17 June 2016
Budapest University of Technology and Economics
www.caadence.bme.hu
CAADence in Architecture - Budapest 2016
The aim of these workshops and conference is to help transfer and spread newly appearing design
technologies, educational methods and digital modelling supported by information technology in
architecture. By organizing a workshop with a conference, we would like to close the distance between
practice and theory.
Architects who keep up with the new designs demanded by the building industry will remain at the
forefront of the design process in our information-technology based world. Being familiar with the
tools available for simulations and early phase models will enable architects to lead the process.
We can get “back to command”.
The other message of our slogan is <Back to command>.
In the expanding world of IT applications there is a need for the ready change of preliminary models by
using parameters and scripts. These approaches retrieve the feeling of command-oriented systems,
DOWKRXJKZLWKPXFKJUHDWHUH΍HFWLYHQHVV
Why CAADence in architecture?
"The cadence is perhaps one of the most unusual elements of classical music, an indispensable addition
to an orchestra-accompanied concerto that, though ubiquitous, can take a wide variety of forms. By
GHȴQLWLRQDFDGHQFHLVDVRORWKDWSUHFHGHVDFORVLQJIRUPXODLQZKLFKWKHVRORLVWSOD\VDVHULHVRI
personally selected or invented musical phrases, interspersed with previously played themes – in short,
a free ground for virtuosic improvisation."
Back to command
ISBN 978-963-313-225-8
Edited by Mihály Szoboszlai
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| CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> 2
CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> |3
Editor
Mihály Szoboszlai
Faculty of Architecture
Budapest University of Technology and Economics
2nd edition, July 2016
CAADence in Architecture – Proceedings of the International Conference on Computer
Aided Architectural Design, Budapest, Hungary, 16th-17th June 2016. Edited by
Mihály Szoboszlai, Department of Architectural Representation, Faculty of Architecture,
Budapest University of Technology and Economics
Cover page: Faraway Design Kft.
DTP: Tamás Rumi
ISBN: 978-963-313-225-8
CAADence in Architecture. Back to command
Budapesti Műszaki és Gazdaságtudományi Egyetem
Copyright © 2016
Publisher: Faculty of Architecture, Budapest University of Technology and Economics
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or
by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior
written permission of the publisher.
| CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> 4
CAADence in
Architecture
Back to command
Proceedings of the International Conference on
Computer Aided Architectural Design
16-17 June 2016
Budapest, Hungary
Faculty of Architecture
Budapest University of Technology and Economics
Edited by
Mihály Szoboszlai
CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> |5
Theme
CAADence in Architecture
Back to command
The aim of these workshops and conference is to help transfer and spread newly ap-
pearing design technologies, educational methods and digital modelling supported by
information technology in architecture. By organizing a workshop with a conference,
we would like to close the distance between practice and theory.
Architects who keep up with the new design demanded by the building industry will
remain at the forefront of the design process in our IT-based world. Being familiar with
the tools available for simulations and early phase models will enable architects to
lead the process. We can get “back to command”.
Our slogan “Back to Command” contains another message. In the expanding world of
IT applications, one must be able to change preliminary models readily by using dif-
ferent parameters and scripts. These approaches bring back the feeling of command-
oriented systems, although with much greater effectiveness.
Why CAADence in architecture?
“The cadence is perhaps one of the most unusual elements of classical music, an indis-
pensable addition to an orchestra-accompanied concerto that, though ubiquitous, can
take a wide variety of forms. By definition, a cadence is a solo that precedes a closing
formula, in which the soloist plays a series of personally selected or invented musical
phrases, interspersed with previously played themes – in short, a free ground for vir-
tuosic improvisation.”
Nowadays sophisticated CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) applications
might operate in the hand of architects like instruments in the hand of musicians. We
have used the word association cadence/caadence as a sort of word play to make this
event even more memorable.
Mihály Szoboszlai
Chair of the Organizing Committee
| CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> 6
Sponsors
CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> |7
Acknowledgement
We would like to express our sincere thanks to all of the authors, reviewers, session
chairs, and plenary speakers. We also wish say thank you to the workshop organizers,
who brought practice to theory closer together.
This conference was supported by our sponsors: GRAPHISOFT, AUTODESK, and
STUDIO IN-EX. Additionally, the Faculty of Architecture at Budapest University of Tech-
nology and Economics provided support through its “Future Fund” (Jövő Alap), helping
to bring internationally recognized speakers to this conference.
Members of our local organizing team have supported this event with their special con-
tribution – namely, their hard work in preparing and managing this conference.
Local conference staff
Ádám Tamás Kovács, Bodó Bánáti, Imre Batta, Bálint Csabay, Benedek Gászpor,
Alexandra Göőz, Péter Kaknics, András Zsolt Kovács, Erzsébet Kőnigné Tóth,
Bence Krajnyák, Levente Lajtos, Pál Ledneczki, Mark Searle, Béla Marsal,
Albert Máté, Boldizsár Medvey, Johanna Pék, Gábor Rátonyi, László Strommer,
Zsanett Takács, Péter Zsigmond
Mihály Szoboszlai
Chair of the Organizing Committee
| CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> 8
Workshop tutors
Algorithmic Design through BIM
Erik Havadi
Laura Baróthy
Working with BIM Analyses
Balázs Molnár
Máté Csócsics
Zsolt Oláh
OPEN BIM
Ákos Rechtorisz
Tamás Erős
GDL in Daily Work
Gergely Fehér
Dominika Bobály
Gergely Hári
James Badcock
CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> |9
Abdelmohsen, Sherif - Egypt
Achten, Henri - Czech Republic
Agkathidis, Asterios - United Kingdom
Asanowicz, Aleksander - Poland
Bhatt, Anand - India
Braumann, Johannes - Austria
Celani, Gabriela - Brazil
Cerovsek, Tomo - Slovenia
Chaszar, Andre - Netherlands
Chronis, Angelos - Spain
Dokonal, Wolfgang - Austria
Estévez, Alberto T. - Spain
Fricker, Pia - Switzerland
Herr, Christiane M. - China
Hoffmann, Miklós - Hungary
Juhász, Imre - Hungary
Jutraz, Anja - Slovenia
Kieferle, Joachim B. - Germany
Klinc, Robert - Slovenia
Koch, Volker - Germany
Kolarevic, Branko - Canada
König, Reinhard - Switzerland
Krakhofer, Stefan - Hong Kong
van Leeuwen, Jos - Netherlands
Lomker, Thorsten - United Arab Emirates
Lorenz, Wolfgang - Austria
Loveridge, Russell - Switzerland
Mark, Earl - United States
Molnár, Emil - Hungary
Németh, László - Hungary
Nourian, Pirouz - Netherlands
Oxman, Rivka - Israel
Parlac, Vera - Canada
Quintus, Alex - United Arab Emirates
Scoppa, Martin - United States
Searle, Mark - Hungary
Szoboszlai, Mihály - Hungary
Tuncer, Bige - Singapore
Verbeke, Johan - Belgium
Vermillion, Joshua - United States
Watanabe, Shun - Japan
Wojtowicz, Jerzy - Poland
Wurzer, Gabriel - Austria
Yamu, Claudia - Netherlands
List of Reviewers
| CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> 10
Contents
14 Keynote speakers
15 Keynote
15 Backcasting and a New Way of Command in Computational Design
Reinhard Koenig, Gerhard Schmitt
27 Half Cadence: Towards Integrative Design
Branko Kolarevic
33 Call from the industry leaders
33 Kajima’s BIM Theory & Methods
Kazumi Yajima
41 Section A1 - Shape grammar
41 Minka, Machiya, and Gassho-Zukuri
Procedural Generation of Japanese Traditional Houses
Shun Watanabe
49 3D Shape Grammar of Polyhedral Spires
László Strommer
55 Section A2 - Smart cities
55 Enhancing Housing Flexibility Through Collaboration
Sabine Ritter De Paris, Carlos Nuno Lacerda Lopes
61 Connecting Online-Configurators (Including 3D Representations) with
CAD-Systems
Small Scale Solutions for SMEs in the Design-Product and Building Sector
Matthias Kulcke
67 BIM to GIS and GIS to BIM
Szabolcs Kari, László Lellei, Attila Gyulai, András Sik, Miklós Márton Riedel
CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> |11
73 Section A3 - Modeling with scripting
73 Parametric Details of Membrane Constructions
Bálint Péter Füzes, Dezső Hegyi
79 De-Script-ion: Individuality / Uniformity
Helen Lam Wai-yin, Vito Bertin
87 Section B1 - BIM
87 Forecasting Time between Problems of Building Components by Using
BIM
Michio Matsubayashi, Shun Watanabe
93 Integration of Facility Management System and Building Information
Modeling
Lei Xu
99 BIM as a Transformer of Processes
Ingolf Sundfør, Harald Selr
105 Section B2 - Smooth transition
105 Changing Tangent and Curvature Data of B-splines via Knot Manipulation
Szilvia B.-S. Béla, Márta Szilvási-Nagy
111 A General Theory for Finding the Lightest Manmade Structures Using
Voronoi and Delaunay
Mohammed Mustafa Ezzat
119 Section B3 - Media supported teaching
119 Developing New Computational Methodologies for Data Integrated
Design for Landscape Architecture
Pia Fricker
127 The Importance of Connectivism in Architectural Design Learning:
Developing Creative Thinking
Verónica Paola Rossado Espinoza
133 Ambient PET(b)ar
Kateřina Nováková
141 Geometric Modelling and Reconstruction of Surfaces
Lidija Pletenac
| CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> 12
149 Section C1 - Collaborative design + Simulation
149 Horizontal Load Resistance of Ruined Walls Case Study of a Hungarian
Castle with the Aid of Laser Scanning Technology
Tamás Ther, István Sajtos
155 2D-Hygrothermal Simulation of Historical Solid Walls
Michela Pascucci, Elena Lucchi
163 Responsive Interaction in Dynamic Envelopes with Mesh Tessellation
Sambit Datta, Smolik Andrei, Tengwen Chang
169 Identification of Required Processes and Data for Facilitating the
Assessment of Resources Management Efficiency During Buildings Life
Cycle
Moamen M. Seddik, Rabee M. Reffat, Shawkat L. Elkady
177 Section C2 - Generative Design -1
177 Stereotomic Models In Architecture A Generative Design Method to
Integrate Spatial and Structural Parameters Through the Application of
Subtractive Operations
Juan José Castellón González, Pierluigi D’Acunto
185 Visual Structuring for Generative Design Search Spaces
Günsu Merin Abbas, İpek Gürsel Dino
195 Section D2 - Generative Design - 2
195 Solar Envelope Optimization Method for Complex Urban Environments
Francesco De Luca
203 Time-based Matter: Suggesting New Formal Variables for Space Design
Delia Dumitrescu
213 Performance-oriented Design Assisted by a Parametric Toolkit
- Case study
Bálint Botzheim, Kitti Gidófalvy, Patricia Emy Kikunaga, András Szollár,
András Reith
221 Classification of Parametric Design Techniques
Types of Surface Patterns
Réka Sárközi, Péter Iványi, Attila Béla Széll
CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> |13
227 Section D1 - Visualization and communication
227 Issues of Control and Command in Digital Design and Architectural
Computation
Andre Chaszar
235 Integrating Point Clouds to Support Architectural Visualization and
Communication
Dóra Surina, Gábor Bödő, Konsztantinosz Hadzijanisz, Réka Lovas,
Beatrix Szabó, Barnabás Vári, András Fehér
243 Towards the Measurement of Perceived Architectural Qualities
Benjamin Heinrich, Gabriel Wurzer
249 Complexity across scales in the work of Le Corbusier
Using box-counting as a method for analysing facades
Wolfgang E. Lorenz
256 Author’s index
| CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> 14
REINHARD KÖNIG
Reinhard König studied architecture and urban planning. He completed his PhD thesis
in 2009 at the
University of Karlsruhe
. Dr. König has worked as a research assistant
and appointed Interim Professor of the
Chair for Computer Science in Architecture
at
Bauhaus-University Weimar. He heads research projects on the complexity of urban
systems and societies, the understanding of cities by means of agent based models and
cellular automata as well as the development of evolutionary design methods. From
2013 Reinhard König works at the Chair of Information Architecture, ETH Zurich. In
2014 Dr. König was guest professor at the
Technical University Munich
. His current
research interests are applicability of multi-criteria optimisation techniques for design
problems and the development of computational analysis methods for spatial configu-
rations. Results from these research activities are transferred into planning software
of the company
DecodingSpaces
. From 2015 Dr. König heads the Junior-Professorship
for
Computational Architecture
at
Bauhaus-University Weimar,
and acts as Co-PI at
the
Future Cities Lab
in Singapore, where he focus on Cognitive Design Computing.
Main research project:
Planning Synthesis
&
Computational Planning Group
see also
the project description:
Computational Planning Synthesis
and his external research
web site:
Computational Planning Science
BRANKO KOLAREVIC
Branko Kolarevic is a Professor of Architecture at the
University of Calgary
Faculty
of Environmental Design, where he also holds the Chair in Integrated Design and co-
directs the Laboratory for Integrative Design (LID). He has taught architecture at sev-
eral universities in North America and Asia and has lectured worldwide on the use of
digital technologies in design and production. He has authored, edited or co-edited sev-
eral books, including “
Building Dynamics: Exploring Architecture of Change
” (with Vera
Parlac), “Manufacturing Material Effects” (with Kevin Klinger), “Performative Archi-
tecture” (with Ali Malkawi) and “Architecture in the Digital Age.” He is a past president
of the
Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture
(ACADIA), past president
of the
Canadian Architectural Certification Board
(CACB), and was recently elected fu-
ture president of the
Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture
(ACSA). He is
a recipient of the ACADIA Award for Innovative Research in 2007 and ACADIA Society
Award of Excellence in 2015. He holds doctoral and master’s degrees in design from
Harvard University
and a diploma engineer in architecture degree from the
University
of Belgrade
.
Keynote speakers
Section A2 - Smart cities | CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> |61
Connecting Online-Configurators (Including 3D Represen-
tations) with CAD-Systems
Small Scale Solutions for SMEs in the Design-Product and
Building Sector
Matthias Kulcke1
1Institute of Building Technology/Department of Architecture
Hamburg University of Technology/HafenCity University Hamburg, Germany
1e-mail: matthias@kulcke.de
Abstract: As small and medium enterprises, such as craftsmen in the building
sector, are often unable to invest in larger scale software solutions, full-blown on-
line product configurators with embedded real-time 3D rendering appeared to
have been out of reach for most of them so far, because of comparatively high in-
vestments; considering programming and launch as well as maintenance, espe-
cially regarding the necessary eort to ensure smooth front-end availability and
performance. This paper discusses the possibilities to develop and implement
online-configurators with 3D representations as small scale solution for SMEs
in the design-product and building sector. In this context an exemplary overview
is presented and discussed; starting with the parametric design of the product
in Rhino/Grasshopper, moving on to the translation of its geometry into webGL
embedded in a JavaScript/PHP-combination for 3D representation in a simple
online-configurator and then importing customer-chosen values for the definition
of product-instances back into the Rhino/Grasshopper CAD environment, with
the aim of semi-automatically creating production data for the CNC-milling of
customized product-parts.
Keywords: configurators, 3D visualization, mass customization, SMEs, semi-
automated customer dialogue
DOI: 10.3311/CAADence.1660
INTRODUCTION
In 2013, Piller and Piroozfar have shown a variety
of concepts and approaches to use mass customi-
zation (which is spelled “mass customisation” in
the title of their publication) and the accompa-
nying tools, such as online-configurators, in the
building sector and the field of architecture [1];
there appears to be a growing trend to apply mass
customization in this area e. g. in offering furni-
ture to customers who are enabled to make final
adjustments of the product before ordering. The
configurator database of 2015, released by Paul
Blazek et. al. [2] lists comparatively few configu-
rators in this sector, considering that parametric
design as a term and technique has been around in
| CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> | Section A2 - Smart cities62
design and architecture for quite some time. One
of the reasons may be the considerable technical
effort to ensure smooth front-end availability if
3D representation is wished for [3], but generally
also budget and easy implementation in the over-
all workflow play an important role for small and
medium enterprises, and lack of one or the other
may be a serious obstacle.
1. ACCESSIBILITY OF 3D VISUALIZATION
WEBTOOLS
In recent years the accompanying online-solu-
tion to OpenGL, webGL (which is commonly used
within JavaScript frameworks) has offered a
technical environment for relatively easy-to-im-
plement interactive 3D representation. Using the
<canvas>-tag as part of HTML5, web-applications
can be programmed that allow for an interactive
3D representation of more or less complex ob-
jects. In the following example of a simple mod-
ular shelf system in an online configurator, PHP
has been used in addition to enable the user not
only to interact with the 3D representation of the
object by zooming and turning, but also by chang-
ing its parameters and thus altering its geometry
(Figure 1).
These parameters not only change the online 3D
representation, but can al so be send to the manu-
fac turer, who first and foremost need the data (al-
tered by individual specification), not necessarily
the 3D web-image. The latter usually serves, as
its main purpose, as an illustration of the changes
made by the customer to him-or herself.
2. DATAPROCESSING IN RHINO/GRASS
HOPPER
In the proposed workflow the manufacturer is
using Rhino/Grasshopper to further process the
data sent by the customer (Figure 2). Rhino is used
here since it is still a comparatively low-cost CAD
tool with a powerful selection of APIs, enabling
further manipulation. Also, it is especially suited
for parametric design tasks with a low-barrier ap-
proach via the free of charge Grasshopper plug-in
for graphical macro programming.
2.1 Importing Customer-Generated Data
Grasshopper is equipped with a special node,
which allows to import text from a .txt-file. This
means the geometry of an object constructed
within Rhino/Grasshopper may be changed with-
Figure 1:
Simple online-configu-
rator with interactive 3D
representation
Section A2 - Smart cities | CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> |63
out even touching any lever inside the Grasshop-
per UI, the 3D modell is changed just by opening
the .gh-file.
2.2 Further Customer-Dialogue
The .gh-file is the basis for visualization output
out of Rhino. It provides the 3D model as the basis
for photorealistic renderings, plan with measure-
ments and price-calculation, that can be send to
the customer as text/and or .jpg-file as part of a
(standardized) e-mail or in print.
2.3 Semi-Automated Export of the
Machine Program
An export node similar to the text import can be
used to further process the data and automatical-
ly write the program for the CNC milling machine
and/or e. g. for the output of parts lists which then
can be used in the shop or within additional soft-
ware to optimize material use.
Figure 2:
Overview of the ordering
process
| CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> | Section A2 - Smart cities64
3. PREPARING PRODUCTSPECIFIC
DATAENVIRONMENTS
3.1 Production of the Product-Specific
Grasshopper Geometry
If the manufacturer has a certain product he/she
wants to offer via an online configurator, the prod-
uct needs to be parametrically constructed once,
using the text-import node for referencing the dis-
crete and steady variables, which will be supplied
later by the customers. The production of such
a macro program in Rhino/Grasshopper can be
externalized; this software-combination is of ad-
vantage regarding the described overall workflow
scenario, since it doesn’t require deep program-
ming knowledge to produce e. g. modular and
especially orthogonal products or product parts,
that leave certain parameters up to the custom-
ers’ choice. Still, that doesn’t imply, that crafts-
men have to turn to programming. Such graphical
macro programming can be managed by students,
alumni and professionals working in the fields of
design and architecture - persons who are closer
to the products in question than professional pro-
grammers, but still (often) already equipped with
the necessary IT skills.
3.2 Production of the Product-Specific
Machine Program
During a workshop in 2013 in Cologne held by Hans
Sachs from responsive design studio [4] and his
colleague Sebastian Bächer the author learned
about their specific strategy of automatically gen-
erating text out of fixed and variable text blocks
that translated with the help of simple Visual Ba-
sic scripting into full .mpr-syntax. A .mpr-file in
turn can be used e. g. inside the software Wood-
Wop, which allows for digital communication with
the CNC milling machine in the shop. The produc-
tion auf this part of the product-specific .gh-file
requires a certain specific degree of know-how
which can be acquired in a two-day workshop, or
else this piece of the macro program can also be
punctually externalized whenever a new product
is introduced. The general aim is to reduce or
eliminate the need for shop floor programming
(SFP) [5].
4. CONCLUSION
The proposed workflow offers designers and
craftsmen/manufacturers a comparatively low-
cost solution for implementing parametric design
and online configurators in the overall strategy of
their enterprise. It shows an approach that opens
up the possibility to make parametric design and
mass customization part of the online-marketing
of SMEs in the design- and building sector with-
out the need of a high initial investment. It does
however call for a closer cooperation between
a younger generation of designers and archi-
tects with producers who run their businesses
as craftsmen on a broader scale than is usually
the case. In addition to this the task remains to
provide individually configurable semi-automatic
data processing from the CAD model to the CNC
milling machine (or other machines) for SMEs,
that are easy to implement and meet the needs of
individual enterprises [6].
4.1 Outlook on Design Education
Students in design and architecture often have the
chance to learn about parametric design (e. g. us-
ing the Rhino/Grasshopper combination); the con-
nection to mass customization however, is made
less frequently. Next steps in developing this area
in the building sector could be, on the part of de-
sign education, to regularly introduce parametric
design techniques accompanied by theory and
practical exercises directed also at mass custom-
ization strategies in design and architecture.
4.2 Outlook on the Automated Production
of Product-Specific Machine Program-
ming
The digital strategy of Hans Sachs and Sebastian
Bächer to automatically combine fixed and vari-
able text blocks including customer choices into
full .mpr-syntax within the Grasshopper macro
program could also be applied by just using PHP-
programming. The practicality of this alternative
approach needs to be tested as a next step refin-
ing the proposed workflow.
Section A2 - Smart cities | CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> |65
REFERENCES
[1] Piller, F. and Piroozfar, P. A. E.,
Mass Customisa-
tion in Architecture and Construction
, Routlegde,
New York, 2013.
[2] Blazek, P.,
Configurator Database
, 2015
[3] Westerholm, T., Stylemachine – Case Study: Mass
Tailoring The Housing Block Apartments on the
Internet, Routlegde, New York, In: Piller, F. and
Piroozfar, P. A.E.,
Mass Customisation in Archi-
tecture and Construction
, 2013, p.199, 206
[4] Sachs, H.,
responsive design studio
, http://www.
responsivedesign.de
[5] Ludolph, M.; Herchenhahn, A.; Behre, H.,
CAD/
CAM Technologien – Änderungen der Qualifika-
tionsstrukturen in klein- und mittelständischen
Betrieben des Holzhandwerks
, LitVerlag. Mün-
ster, In: Pangalos, J., Spöttl, G., Knutzen, S. and
Howe, F., Informatisierung von Arbeit, Technik
und Bildung. Eine berufswissenschaftliche Be-
standsaufnahme, 2005, p. 115
[6] ProWood Stiftung,
Untersuchung zur Situa-
tion und zukünftigen Entwicklung im Tischler-
handwerk. Study commisioned by ProWood Stif-
tung (carried out by applikatio)
, Frankfurt am
Main, 2010, p.7
| CAADence in Architecture <Back to command> 256
Author’s index
Abbas, Günsu Merin ............................185
Balla-S. Béla, Szilvia ...........................105
Bertin, Vito .............................................79
Botzheim, Bálint .................................. 213
Bödő, Gábor .........................................235
Castellon Gonzalez, Juan José ...........177
Chang, Tengwen ..................................163
Chaszar, Andre ....................................227
D’Acunto, Pierluigi ...............................177
Datta, Sambit .......................................163
De Luca, Francesco .............................195
De Paris, Sabine ....................................55
Dino, Ipek Gürsel ................................. 185
Dumitrescu, Delia................................203
Elkady, Shawkat L. ..............................169
Ezzat, Mohammed ............................... 111
Fehér, András ......................................235
Fricker, Pia ........................................... 119
Füzes, Bálint Péter ................................73
Gidófalvy, Kitti...................................... 213
Gyulai, Attila ..........................................67
Hadzijanisz, Konsztantinosz ...............235
Hegyi, Dezső ..........................................73
Heinrich, Benjamin ..............................243
Iványi, Péter .........................................221
Kari, Szabolcs ........................................ 67
Kikunaga, Patricia Emy .......................213
Koenig, Reinhard ...................................15
Kolarevic, Branko ..................................27
Kulcke, Matthias ...................................61
Lam, Wai Yin ..........................................79
Lellei, László .........................................67
Lorenz, Wolfgang E. ............................249
Lovas, Réka .........................................235
Lucchi, Elena .......................................155
Matsubayashi, Michio ............................87
Nováková, Kateřina .............................133
Nuno Lacerda Lopes, Carlos ................55
Pascucci, Michela ................................155
Pletenac, Lidija .................................... 141
Reffat M., Rabee .................................. 169
Reith, András ....................................... 213
Riedel, Miklós Márton ...........................67
Rossado Espinoza, Verónica Paola ..... 127
Sajtos, István .......................................149
Sárközi, Réka ....................................... 221
Schmitt, Gerhard ...................................15
Seddik, Moamen M. ............................. 169
Selvær, Harald .......................................99
Sik, András ............................................67
Smolik, Andrei .....................................163
Strommer, László .................................. 49
Sundfør, Ingolf .......................................99
Surina, Dóra ........................................235
Szabó, Beatrix ......................................235
Széll, Attila Béla ..................................221
Szilvási-Nagy, Márta ...........................105
Szollár, András ....................................213
Ther, Tamás .........................................149
Vári, Barnabás .....................................235
Watanabe, Shun ............................... 41, 87
Wurzer, Gabriel ....................................243
Xu, Lei ....................................................93
Yajima, Kazumi ......................................33
CAADence in Architecture
Back to command
International workshop and conference
16-17 June 2016
Budapest University of Technology and Economics
www.caadence.bme.hu
CAADence in Architecture - Budapest 2016
The aim of these workshops and conference is to help transfer and spread newly appearing design
technologies, educational methods and digital modelling supported by information technology in
architecture. By organizing a workshop with a conference, we would like to close the distance between
practice and theory.
Architects who keep up with the new designs demanded by the building industry will remain at the
forefront of the design process in our information-technology based world. Being familiar with the
tools available for simulations and early phase models will enable architects to lead the process.
We can get “back to command”.
The other message of our slogan is <Back to command>.
In the expanding world of IT applications there is a need for the ready change of preliminary models by
using parameters and scripts. These approaches retrieve the feeling of command-oriented systems,
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Why CAADence in architecture?
"The cadence is perhaps one of the most unusual elements of classical music, an indispensable addition
to an orchestra-accompanied concerto that, though ubiquitous, can take a wide variety of forms. By
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personally selected or invented musical phrases, interspersed with previously played themes – in short,
a free ground for virtuosic improvisation."
Back to command
ISBN 978-963-313-225-8
Edited by Mihály Szoboszlai
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borito14mm.pdf 1 2016.06.09. 8:46:43
... This greatly improved the network visualization ability of the building industry. On the basis of the WebGL, JavaScript, and PHP technologies, Kulcke [48] built a network configuration 3D environment, which could parameterize Rhino/Locust products. ...
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At present, some service platforms for 3D manufacturing encounter problems, including the low level of integration with digital design ability, the single character of cooperative printings, the uneven distribution of 3D printing resources, and the high 3D design requirements of users. To overcome these issues, a cloud service platform for the seamless integration of digital design and rapid prototyping manufacturing was established using ASP.NET, WebGL, WebSocket, and SQL Server in combination with C# language and JavaScript. The goals were to realize a design and rapid prototyping of mechanical equipment parts that are browser based and provide online digital design services, such as the parametric design of key parts, downloading of models, format conversion, and virtual assembly. The client application layer, server processing layer, database layer, and working machine end application layer of this cloud 3D printing platform were set up. The result of the design module could be printed remotely in 3D. Practical application showed that the platform could effectively improve the R&D and design speed of the parts and components of the mechanical equipment and reduce the effort of designers. In particular, this platform would be suitable for users without a 3D design background. The design and rapid prototyping parts of the platform satisfied the dimensional precision required by enterprises, which provides an important basis for the further verification of the design correctness for small- and medium-sized enterprises and has high application value.
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Challenged by the recent economic crisis, the building and construction industry is currently seeking new orientation and strategies. Here mass customisation is uncovered as a key strategy in helping to meet this challenge. The term mass customisation denotes an offering that meets the demands of each individual customer, whilst still being produced with mass production efficiency. Today mass customisation is emerging from a pilot stage into a scalable and sustainable strategy… The first dedicated publication of its kind, this book provides a forum for the concept within an applied and highly innovative context. The book includes contributions from some of the most prominent thinkers and practitioners in the field from across the world, including Kasper S. Vibaek, Steve Kendall, Martin Bechthold, Mitchell M. Tseng, and Masa Noguchi. Bringing together this panel of experts who have carried out research both in academia and practice, this book provides an overview of state-of-the-art practice related to the concept of customisation and personalisation within the built environment.
Stylemachine – Case Study: Mass Tailoring The Housing Block Apartments on the Internet
  • T Westerholm
Westerholm, T., Stylemachine – Case Study: Mass Tailoring The Housing Block Apartments on the Internet, Routlegde, New York, In: Piller, F. and Piroozfar, P. A.E., Mass Customisation in Architecture and Construction, 2013, p.199, 206
Untersuchung zur Situation und zukünftigen Entwicklung im Tischlerhandwerk. Study commisioned by ProWood Stiftung (carried out by applikatio)
  • Prowood Stiftung
ProWood Stiftung, Untersuchung zur Situation und zukünftigen Entwicklung im Tischlerhandwerk. Study commisioned by ProWood Stiftung (carried out by applikatio), Frankfurt am Main, 2010, p.7
Mass Customisation in Architecture and Construction
  • T Westerholm
  • Stylemachine-Case
  • Study
Westerholm, T., Stylemachine-Case Study: Mass Tailoring The Housing Block Apartments on the Internet, Routlegde, New York, In: Piller, F. and Piroozfar, P. A.E., Mass Customisation in Architecture and Construction, 2013, p.199, 206
CAD/ CAM Technologien -Änderungen der Qualifikationsstrukturen in klein-und mittelständischen Betrieben des Holzhandwerks
  • M Ludolph
  • A Herchenhahn
  • H Behre
  • J Pangalos
  • G Spöttl
  • S Knutzen
  • F Howe
Ludolph, M.; Herchenhahn, A.; Behre, H., CAD/ CAM Technologien -Änderungen der Qualifikationsstrukturen in klein-und mittelständischen Betrieben des Holzhandwerks, LitVerlag. Münster, In: Pangalos, J., Spöttl, G., Knutzen, S. and Howe, F., Informatisierung von Arbeit, Technik und Bildung. Eine berufswissenschaftliche Bestandsaufnahme, 2005, p. 115