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Exploring the effect of sound and music on health in hospital settings: A narrative review

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... The term was initially an anthropological concept, a tool for discussing historical cultural events, much like the landscape is for vision [5]. The soundscape, can include both acoustic and synthetic-based audio, composed to fill an environment with a specific intention e. g., for environments in which excessive background noise is causing task-distraction, such as a hospital [6]. ...
... As a state of the art audio approach, we extract 4 096 deep data-representations using the DEEP SPEC-TRUM toolkit [38] 6 . DEEP SPECTRUM extracts feature representations from the audio data using pre-trained convolutional neural networks, for this study we utilise the VGG19 pre-trained network. ...
Preprint
The field of sound healing includes ancient practices coming from a broad range of cultures. Across such practices there is a variety of instrumentation utilised. Practitioners suggest the ability of sound to target both mental and even physical health issues, e.g., chronic-stress, or joint-pain. Instruments including the Tibetan singing bowl and vocal chanting, are methods which are still widely encouraged today. With the noise-floor of modern urban soundscapes continually increasing and known to impact wellbeing, methods to approve daily soundscapes are needed. With this in mind, this study presents the Acoustic Sounds for Wellbeing (ASW) dataset. The ASW dataset is a dataset gathered from YouTube including 88+ hrs of audio from 5-classes of acoustic instrumentation (Chimes, Chanting, Drumming, Gongs, and Singing Bowl). We additionally present initial baseline classification results on the dataset, finding that conventional Mel-Frequency Cepstra coefficient features achieve at best an unweighted average recalled of 57.4\% for a 5-class support vector machine classification task.
... In a care setting where the use of sounds is considered, music therapy is an example of the behavior influencing potential of attended sounds. Music has been shown to give a manifold of positive effects, ranging from more physiological effects (arouse body temperature, reduce muscle tension, lower blood pressure, enhance depth breathing, elevate brain waves) to emotional or functional effects (influence emotion, decrease depression/improve mood, increase endurance and productivity, decrease anger, improve memory and learning, enhance sleep quality) [26,27]. Considering the emotional response, music is able to influence the mood and the emotions of a person and the 'Musical Mood Induction Procedure' (MMIP) [17] has gained a lot of attention and has shown that combined specific characteristics of the different musical elements (mode, tempo, pitch, rhythm, harmony and loudness) give rise to a range of emotional expressions (serious, sad, fear, serene, humorous, happy, exciting and majestic). ...
... Personal factors need to be taken into account, since individual differences occur from musical experience, preferences and traits. Indeed, it is important to state that music has a potential twofold outcome, as it can result in a positive or negative impact [26]. Apart from music, many different sounds can be present and take part in an acoustic scene. ...
Article
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Sound and its resulting soundscape is a major appraisal component of the living environment. Where environmental sounds (e.g. outdoor traffic sounds) are often perceived as negative, a soundscape (e.g. containing natural sounds) can also have a positive effect on health and well-being. This supportive effect of a soundscape is getting increasing attention to be used in practice. This paper addresses the design of a supportive sonic environment for persons with dementia in nursing homes. Starting from a review of key mechanisms related to sonic perception, cognitive deficits and related behaviour, a framework is derived for the composition of a sonic environment for persons with dementia. The proposed framework is centred around using acoustic stimuli for influencing mood, stimulating the feeling of safety and triggering a response in a person. These stimuli are intended to be deployed as added sounds in a nursing home to improve the well-being and behaviour of the residents.
... Health care acoustics are being increasingly recognized as a key design factor in the well-being of residents in institutional care settings. [1][2][3][4][5][6][7] Industry reports are now beginning to factor in the experience of sound in environmental design guidelines. 8 Researchers have focused on the role of sound in dementia care, measuring the impact of sound environments on emotional well-being and on challenging behaviours. ...
... 30,31 The experience of long-term care is unique. [1][2][3][4][5]13 Long-term care is not just a temporary hospital stay before returning home to primary relationships; long-term care is for the duration of life and becomes the primary social arena. The social dimensions of the acoustical environment in long-term care require attention. ...
Article
As the global population ages, residential care facilities are challenged to create positive living environments for people in later life. Health care acoustics are increasingly recognized as a key design factor in the experience of well-being for long-term care residents; however, acoustics are being conceptualized predominantly within the medical model. Just as the modern hospital battles disease with technology, sterility and efficiency, health care acoustics are receiving similar treatment. Materialist efforts towards acoustical separation evoke images of containment, quarantine and control, as if sound was something to be isolated. Sound becomes part of the contested space of long-term care that exists in tension between hospital and home. The move towards acoustical separation denies the social significance of sound in residents’ lives. Sound does not displace care; it emplaces care and the social relationships therein. Drawing upon ethnographic fieldwork in a Canadian long-term care facility, this article will use a phenomenological lens to explore how relationships are shaped in sound among residents living in long-term care. Ethnographic vignettes illustrate how the free flow of music through the care unit incited collective engagement among residents, reduced barriers to sharing social space and constructed new social identity. The article concludes that residents’ relationships are shaped within the acoustical milieu of the care unit and that to impose acoustical separation between residents’ living spaces may further isolate residents who are already at risk of loneliness.
... These effects become even more apparent when senior adults with hearing impairment are in a complex sound environment leading to a debilitating impairment for those with hearing loss (Auerbach & Gritton, 2022). Similar research has shown that the listener has an interactive relationship with the surroundings, including soundscape (Iyendo, 2016). From that point of view, sounds which relate to the overall surroundings may be well tolerated, effectuate benefits, and thus lead to positive emotions, and reduce blood pressure and stress when compared to silence (Brown et al., 2015). ...
Article
Purpose To explore the impact of different acoustic stimuli of varying sound pressure levels on physical responses and the perception of senior adults. Background Noise-related health problems have been gaining increased attention as studies have shown an association with negative impacts on physiological parameters resulting in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, a gap in knowledge exists in exploring the impact of exposure to sound recordings in the actual environment on physiological measurements. Methods Five acoustic stimuli were recorded in real life and 120 senior adults listened to them in a sound treated room to analyze the impacts of low-, middle-, and high-decibel sounds on their heart rate, blood pressure, and perception. The physical responses, heart rate, and blood pressure were measured during the sound exposure, and questionnaires were administered afterward. Results Exposure to different sounds resulted in fluctuations and an inconsistent trend in heart rate, systolic pressure, and diastolic pressure. According to the physical measures and subjective evaluations, sport sounds and traffic noise were given the lowest rating for preference, while music was perceived as the most comfortable. Conclusions A sound pressure level below 55–65 dB(A) correlates with increased comfort and less increase in heart rate and blood pressure. Senior adults with normal hearing preferred and were most comfortable with music, while those with severe hearing impairment preferred entertainment sounds the most.
... Synthetic music within a hospital has shown to have a strong impact on a patient's experience [61]. Similarly, the acoustic environment of a workplace benefits from artificial acoustic design [30], and through integration of synthetically designed audio environments the workplace experience also improves [25]. Synthetic audio generation has also been investigated in the realm of therapeutic applications, specifically exploring how synthetic sound might influence listeners experiences in psychological areas, such as creativity or self-perception [44]. ...
Chapter
Our daily interaction with the soundscape is in flux, and complex natural sound combinations have shown to have adverse implications on user experience. A computational approach to stabilise the sonic environment, tailored to a user’s current affective state may prove beneficial in a variety of scenarios, including workplace efficiency, and exercise. Herein, we present initial perception test results, from a rudimentary approach for soundscape augmentation utilising chromatic feature sonification. Results show that arousal and valance dimensions of emotion can be altered through augmentation of three classes of natural soundscape, namely ‘mechanical’, ‘nature’, and ‘human’. Proceeding this we outline a possible approach for an affective audio-based recognition and generation system, in which users (either individually or as a group within a specific environment) are provided with an augmentation of their current soundscape, as a means of improving wellbeing.
... Thanks to these neurochemical systems; melodic, soft and soothing music can make people quiet and relax (16). It is seen in clinical studies that music affects people's emotions and gives positive results (16)(17)(18). Binaural beats are also effective like music in reducing anxiety. Binaural beats were reported in 19th century and Oster (4) introduced in detail in 1973. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The aim of this prospective clinical study was to investigate the effectiveness of binaural beats and music at a frequency of 432 Hz and compare which method is more effective for reducing preoperative dental anxiety in impacted third molar surgery. Material and methods: Ninety patients were randomly selected to the binaural beats group, music group and control group. Visual analog scale used to evaluate dental anxiety before the local anesthesia in the first measurement. Local anesthesia was applied to the all patients. Patients in the music group listened to 432 Hz tuned music using earphones for 10 minutes. Patients in the binaural beats group listened to binaural beats using earphones (for the right ear, 220 Hz and for the left ear 210 Hz) for 10 minutes. No special treatment was applied to the patients in control group. In the second measurement, dental anxiety was measured again in all three groups. For analysis of differences between three groups was used One way Anova and Kruskal Wallis test. Results: Twenty seven male and 53 female patients included the study. In the first measurement, the same level of anxiety was recorded in all three groups. (p=0.811) There was a significant decrease in anxiety in both the binaural beats and music group in the second measurement. (p<0.001). Conclusions: Binaural beats and 432 Hz tuned music are a valid non pharmacological adjuvant to reduce dental anxiety in impacted third molar surgery. They have a positive effect to reduce the dental anxiety.
... Studies have shown that music, both in general and more specifically in hospitals, can result in positive emotions, improved performance, better cognitive functioning, and decreased stress levels. These positive impacts may also be beneficial to physicians, nurses, and other hospital staff working in stressful ICU environments (Iyendo, 2016;Spence & Keller, 2019). Improving the work environment for hospital staff may benefit healthcare organizations by potentially decreasing staff turnover, increasing job satisfaction, and improving staff relationships (Sonke et al., 2015;Wilson et al., 2016). ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Therapeutic music has been shown to provide significant physical and mental health benefits to patients, yet limited information is available on the impact of live classical music in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Objective: The purpose of this initiative was to implement and evaluate a therapeutic music program in the ICU. Methods: A descriptive survey methodology was used to obtain information from volunteer musicians and clinical nurses. Researchers used a 12-item anonymous web-based survey to collect information on the therapeutic music program's acceptability, appropriateness, and feasibility. The survey also included questions addressing potential barriers to and facilitators of implementing therapeutic music in the ICU. Results: A total of 15 nursing staff and 6 volunteer musicians completed the online survey. Of the 15 nurse respondents (9 clinical nursing staff, 3 advanced practice, 3 other), a majority (n=10, 66.7%) identified that therapeutic music was acceptable in the ICU. Similarly, a majority (n=11, 73.3%) indicated that therapeutic music was appropriate and feasible. Of the volunteer musicians, all (n=6, 100%) identified several factors that helped to facilitate the program including having an upright piano with large casters (wheels) for enhanced mobility to play music. Most (n=5, 83.3%) identified having a patient and family-centered care environment and supportive ICU staff, and four (66.7%) identified private ICU rooms and trained musicians as useful. Several barriers were also identified, including severity of patient illness and infection prevention concerns (n=5, 83.3%), space limitations in the ICU and patient privacy concerns (n=2, 33.35%), and patients being asleep (n=1, 16.75%). Conclusions: The results of this initiative indicated that therapeutic music in the ICU was rated as acceptable, appropriate, and feasible. Volunteer musicians reported the ability to provide live music in the ICU to be a beneficial and enjoyable experience. The program has been transitioned to a virtual format using a large iPad on wheels due to COVID-19-related visitation restrictions.
... Aggressive sound filtering agents are disrupted in the brains of people with this disease, and the patients constantly hear a buzzing-like sound in their ears, which can be solved with the help of active noise control. This method has been successful in reducing low-frequency sounds and there are many examples of its success in industrial and commercial applications [5,6]. However, there are limitations, such as the complexity of the acoustic field, the cost, and the equipment. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Active Noise Control systems (ANCs), are one of the recommended methods for reducing unwanted noise in a variety of environments, including hospitals. This method is an effective alternative to passive methods based on insulators and dampers. This paper presents the design of an active noise control system with the aim of reducing noise pollution in hospitals, as well as a method for treating Tinnitus in three stages. At low frequencies, the designed system performs well in absorbing Single-Frequency noise, and it is proposed to use its development to absorb the frequency spectrum in future studies.
... In addition, a change in the clinical environment might diminish the risk of burnout [35]. For instance, a review showed that soothing music could reduce stress that when employed as background music on the ward [36]. This might help nurses and nursing students develop a sense of belonging to the ward with a result of improved social health. ...
Article
Full-text available
Clinical placement is an essential component for nursing students, allowing them to transfer professional knowledge into practice. The quality of life among nursing students and nurses was reviewed to examine its impact on the quality of provided care. However, it is unclear how social health among nursing students is affected during clinical placement. Final-year students who had finished clinical placement were invited to participate in this qualitative study. Twenty-one in-depth interviews were conducted and transcribed verbatim for thematic analysis. Two main themes, i.e., contributors to lack of social health, and manifestations of lack of social health, emerged from seven sub-themes. Students experienced different challenges during the clinical placement, but some of these did contribute to effects on their social health. Lack of social health might further influence career development after graduation. Supportive strategies from colleagues, nursing colleges and hospitals might potentially improve students' social health during the clinical placement.
... Music is well appreciated by both patients and clinicians. Indeed, it constitutes a non-invasive, cheap and easily applied means that allows to simultaneously relieve a variety of physical and psychological symptoms as well as some of the consequences of the patients' clinical conditions, including stress, anxiety, depression and pain [1][2][3][4]. Despite the promising application of music in addressing the psychological needs of a wide array of populations, its use in the context of health and well-being has been highly limited to institutional settings. ...
Article
Issues Music is among the most frequently used medium to promote young adults' well‐being. To that aim, the efficiency of music is explained by its capacity to modulate emotions through its effect on the brain's reward pathways. Hence, music could help individuals suffering from dysregulations in these pathways, whose experience of positive emotions is often inhibited. Such dysregulations are particularly present in individuals with problematic psychoactive substance (PAS) use, who are overrepresented in the context of homelessness. While few of them initiate treatment, they successfully rely on their own resources to promote their well‐being, including music, though its impact in this context remains under‐studied. Approach This scoping review describes the impact of music on the well‐being, PAS use and addictive trajectory of young housed and homeless individuals with problematic PAS use. Eleven French and English databases were screened for peer‐reviewed articles using concepts and keywords related to music, PAS and well‐being. From the 3697 results, 39 were reviewed. Results were organised according to the observed impact of music and analysed critically. Key Findings Literature shows that PAS users value the impact of music in meeting emotional, psychological and social needs, especially when they experience homelessness. Yet, research has been highly limited to the harmful consequences of music, limiting our knowledge of its potential benefits. Implications and Conclusion To deepen our understanding about the impact of music, future research should endorse a broader perspective and consider the personal and contextual experiences accompanying the involvement in music, factors that were traditionally overlooked.
... Ambrose Bierce had called it, "A stench in the ear; an 2 undomesticated music. " The detrimental signicance of noise in our environment has earned the term noise pollution, signifying the hazardous effect loud sound have on the human auditory anatomy and epidemiology and the immeasurable consequences seen in our modern 3 day environment. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), hearing loss as a result of noise exposure presents a serious Public Health problem with an estimated 1.3 billion people worldwide suffering from this condition and an estimated 10% currently exposed to harmful noise 4 levels. ...
Article
BACKGROUND: Noise is everywhere in our daily lives and becomes very important as it affects our health. Religion is an integral part of daily lives and the use of acoustic and electronic instruments in worship. With the increase in sophistry of these instruments come their attendant untoward effects on the auditory organs of the body. This study was to assess noise exposure levels amongst instrumentalists in Pentecostal churches in Port Harcourt City, Nigeria. MATERIALS & METHODS: Following ethical consideration, 216 consenting respondents from 30 churches in Port Harcourt were recruited by table of random numbers. Structured close ended interviewer administered questionnaire incorporating the Hearing Health Quick Test (HHQT) was used to access demographic data. Hearing assessments were also performed using tonal audiometry. The data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 and presented using descriptive and inferential statistics. RESULTS: Most 90.28% and 37.96% of respondents were male and within the 39-45 year-old age range respectively. Also, 80.56% of respondents were aware that loud music can cause permanent hearing loss. The prevalence of NIHL and Tinnitus was 39% and 38% respectively; and only 19% used Hearing Protection Devices (HPD). Statistically significant risk of NIHL was observed in musicians who had experienced tinnitus, played only amplified instruments and Music experience greater or equal to 10 years (p=0.001). CONCLUSION: Gospel instrumentalists are exposed to noise in the course of their duties which have significant effect on their hearing. Use of Hearing Protection Devices (HPD) as a personal protective equipment is encouraged just as health education of this group of workers is necessary.
... The search strategy is shown in Table S1 as supplementary material online attached to the electronic version of this paper. The search was limited to studies published after January 1990, because prior reviews about sounds in hospitals show that the first sound studies were published in the 1990s (Iyendo, 2016). The review protocol was registered in the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews, PROSPERO (CRD42018117962). ...
Article
Objectives Nursing home residents with dementia are sensitive to detrimental auditory environments. This paper presents the first literature review of empirical research investigating (1) the (perceived) intensity and sources of sounds in nursing homes, and (2) the influence of sounds on health of residents with dementia and staff. Design A systematic review was conducted in PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus. Study quality was assessed with the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. We used a narrative approach to present the results. Results We included 35 studies. Nine studies investigated sound intensity and reported high noise intensity with an average of 55–68 dB(A) (during daytime). In four studies about sound sources, human voices and electronic devices were the most dominant sources. Five cross-sectional studies focused on music interventions and reported positives effects on agitated behaviors. Four randomized controlled trials tested noise reduction as part of an intervention. In two studies, high-intensity sounds were associated with decreased nighttime sleep and increased agitation. The third study found an association between music and less agitation compared to other stimuli. The fourth study did not find an effect of noise on agitation. Two studies reported that a noisy environment had negative effects on staff. Conclusions The need for appropriate auditory environments that are responsive to residents’ cognitive abilities and functioning is not yet recognized widely. Future research needs to place greater emphasis on intervention-based and longitudinal study design.
... On the other hand, music, as a special kind of acoustic stimulus, is one of the factors affecting emotion, which has been widely applied in film, marketing, and therapy [24]. For example, for patients, music can decrease depression [25], anxiety, and stress [26]. Evidence against a strict cognitivist position suggests that music can induce some sort of an emotional response [27,28]. ...
The acoustic environment is one of the factors influencing emotion, however, existing research has mainly focused on the effects of noise on emotion, and on music therapy, while the acoustic and psychological effects of music on interactive behaviour have been neglected. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of music on communicating emotion including evaluation of music, and d-values of pleasure, arousal, and dominance (PAD), in terms of sound pressure level (SPL), musical emotion, and tempo. Based on acoustic environment measurement and a questionnaire survey with 52 participants in a normal classroom in Harbin city, China, the following results were found. First, SPL was significantly correlated with musical evaluation of communication: average scores of musical evaluation decreased sharply from 1.31 to −2.13 when SPL rose from 50 dBA to 60 dBA, while they floated from 0.88 to 1.31 between 40 dBA and 50 dBA. Arousal increased with increases in musical SPL in the negative evaluation group. Second, musical emotions had significant effects on musical evaluation of communication, among which the effect of joyful-sounding music was the highest; and in general, joyful-and stirring-sounding music could enhance pleasure and arousal efficiently. Third, musical tempo had significant effect on musical evaluation and communicating emotion, faster music could enhance arousal and pleasure efficiently. Finally, in terms of social characteristics, familiarity, gender combination, and number of participants affected communicating emotion. For instance, in the positive evaluation group, dominance was much higher in the single-gender groups. This study shows that some music factors, such as SPL, musical emotion, and tempo, can be used to enhance communicating emotion.
... Although loud music sounds have been acknowledged to have adverse effects on the occupants of buildings (Alves et al., 2015;Challe, 2015;Silva, 2015;Treasure, 2012) listening to soothing music reduces stress, blood pressure, depression, anxiety and post-operative trauma when compared to silence (Iyendo, 2016;Keller, 2019;Laura et al., 2015;Raglio et al., 2020). Unequivocally, the first step towards sustainability of our buildings is to care for our society that is full of vibrant ecosystems and that we must work together to preserve (Challe, 2015). ...
Article
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This study examined the socioecological roles of music sounds towards achieving acoustically sustainable residential building. The study adopted a survey research approach where questionnaires were distributed to the occupants of different types of residential buildings in three urban cities of Anambra State Nigeria. The survey data were analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS) Software. The results revealed that music plays significant roles towards acoustically sustainable building performance with the overall average mean score index of 4.36 and a range of 3.64 to 4.87. But the three most outstanding roles played by music towards acoustically sustainable building performance were: Enabling pleasant sound environment (4.87), improving quality of relaxation and resting (4.83), and increasing acoustic comfort and satisfaction (4.79). The result of one-way ANOVA revealed that music sounds significantly influence acoustical sustainability performance of residential buildings (p-value (.000) < α (0.05); F-ratio (148.377) > F-critical (3.020)); and that there was no significance difference between opinions of residents of the three urban cities in this regard (p-value (0.713) > α (0.05); F-ratio (0.338) < F-critical (3.020)). This study therefore, canvassed for integration of music principles and acoustics into sustainable building design processes as a way of achieving a sustainable building.
... Music has various benefits for human life, including in the field of music health can help recovery therapy in elderly patients after surgery that reduces pain and anxiety and can help relaxation during recovery, helps reduce anxiety in pregnant women who are undergoing vertilization, music also used in a hospital concept at certain times that music is played comfortably in treatment rooms so as to reduce anxiety and stress, and make patients feel comfortable and safe (Hanneke et al., 2018;Yilda et al, 2017;Timothy, 2016). Music as one of the media is the harmonization of various kinds of sounds of musical instruments and song lyrics that are packaged in such a way that it becomes a thing that gives a certain effect in human beings. ...
... Music is already used in several applications in society that presume its effectiveness for inducing emotions, such as film music, marketing, and therapy [1]. In terms of mental health therapies, music can stimulate positive emotions and reduce stress levels, which is conducive to reducing anxiety and stress in patients and medical staff [2]. In certain locations, music has different effects. ...
Conference Paper
The research on the influence of indoor sound environments on human behaviour is limited at present. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the influence of music on interactive behaviour in indoor environments. This study used a laboratory experiment, with 40 participants, to consider five social relationship types: relatives/friends (RF), lovers (L), classmates/colleagues (CC), superior /subordinate (SS), and strangers (S). The results showed that in the with music condition, the scores for the degree of influence of noise sources on the conversation were between 0.5 and 6 points lower those in the without music condition. In addition, in the L group, the scores for the participants' interest in the conversation were 0.5 to 3.67 points higher. It also showed that music creates a more positive sound environment; positive scores were up to 7.5. This study suggest that music can be used to change the indoor sound environment and regulate people's interactive behaviour and dialogue quality.
... Hospitals are often perceived as stressful places for patients, their relatives and staff; however, they can be therapeutic if they are designed to foster positive physiological, psychological, social and behavioural outcomes (see Fig. 3). 17,18 This idea is supported by previous studies that documented the need to design of healing environments that improve user experience, 19À21 especially through interventions including art therapy, 22 music therapy, 23 music medicine, 24 forest therapy and HT. 9 While the benefits of healing environments have been discussed, there is a need to explore the specific aspects of these environments in greater depth. ...
Article
Purpose: The first half of this paper documents the role of nature in healthcare environments and its impact on wellness, with a particular focus on gardens. The second half presents a scientific evaluation of the role of gardens as a therapeutic intervention to optimise the clinical outcomes in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia, including a review of the innovative application of technologies alongside nature to promote cognitive rehabilitation in this particular patient population. Methods: Using search engines such as the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science, PubMed, ProQuest Central, MEDLINE, Scopus and Google Scholar, a relevant literature search on the positive health implications of therapeutic gardens (TG) on AD and dementia patients in the healthcare milieu was conducted. Results: The health implications of TG for AD and dementia patients span physical, social, psychological and cognitive effects. Virtual reality (VR) technologies that display natural environments also offer positive cognitive outcomes for AD and dementia patients. Conclusion: TG should be used to improve the health and wellbeing of AD and dementia patients, and its application should be extended to other patient populations to promote quicker recovery. Future directions in the design of TG, with a focus on patients with AD and other dementias, is also discussed.
... Further studies of the roles of auditory stimuli in hospital environments may lead to improved work conditions for medical staff. 46 However, sound levels are rarely controlled using indoor acoustic designs. 47 OR contain multiple instruments and are sites of highly complicated procedures. ...
Article
Noise can exert undeniable pressure on human minds, especially during tasks that require high precision and attention, such as those performed during surgery. To investigate whether auditory stimuli increases mental loads during laparoscopic surgery, we examined the effects of operating room (OR) noises and music by measuring mean changes in pupil sizes and subjectively assessing performances during surgery. We recruited 24 subjects with varying laparoscopic surgery experience levels to perform complete appendectomy using a laparoscopic simulator. Wearable eye trackers were worn by all subjects to monitor pupil sizes during surgery, and surgical tasks were performed under conditions of silence, background OR noise, and music. National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index scores and performance parameters were also recorded during surgical tasks. Noise distractions were associated with significant increases in pupil sizes compared with those observed in silence, and the related increases in mental loads may have affected surgical performance. However, more experienced operators had smaller changes in pupil sizes because of auditory disturbances than moderately experienced surgeons. Noise stimulation in the OR increases surgeon's mental workload and performance. Auditory regulation of the OR may be better standardized using data from studies of the effects of acoustic stimulation in the OR, and mental stresses during surgery could be considered in a more humane manner. Further investigations are necessary to determine the cognitive consequences of various auditory stimuli.
... Disturbing noises can be intensified by hard surfaces, and unpleasant noises can cause sleeping disorders for patients that affect health recovery (Topf, 1992). Iyendo (2016) has studied the impacts of playing music in healthcare environments and concluded that playing soothing music not only does not have negative impacts on patient wellbeing, but also helps to reduce stress, blood pressure and post-operative trauma when compared to silence. A study by Shertzer and Keck (2001) showed patients experienced less pain when noise was reduced and replaced with music. ...
Article
Beyond resource efficiencies, green buildings aim to create healthy indoor environments for building occupants. In terms of improving occupant well-being, a unique case emerges for healthcare facilities, whose patients may be at a vulnerable state. In the U.S., the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system has become the most widely recognized certification system for green buildings, including green healthcare facilities and buildings. Hospitals with high total scores in the LEED rating system are green buildings but may not necessarily be the optimal green healthcare environment from a patient’s wellbeing perspective. Certified health-care facilities were analyzed in terms of their credit valuation to assess whether health-care facilities prioritize specific criteria that influence patient wellbeing and recovery time. Analysis of results indicate hospitals may be valuing the level of certification more than those credits that were deemed relevant for patient wellbeing and rate of recovery, either due to lack of information or due to economic constraints. To consolidate the previous results and to compare the performance of LEED certified green hospitals to the national average, the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey was analyzed for patients’ perspectives on the healthcare facility. Results indicate higher satisfaction in green hospitals’ overall patient care performance as well as a greater tendency to recommend green hospitals to others compared to the national average. No statistical significance was found for hospital cleanliness and quietness between green hospitals and the national average. HIGHLIGHTS
... The reason why was that the ocean waves' ebbs and flows synchronises with the breathing patterns naturally. The ocean soundscapes includes wave, bird and calming wind sounds as the base for the soundscape because these sounds are often associated with relaxation and create a calming atmosphere [8,34]. As the practitioner gets into a deeper meditative state, the tempo of the waves will decrease towards the 4 second ideal of deep breathing common in meditation practice, without impacting the pitch. ...
Conference Paper
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Mindfulness meditation is a beneficial approach to managing stress; however, establishing a practice can be difficult for novice meditators. Interactive soundscapes using brainwave data offer new avenues, yet how to design such novel interfaces is underexplored. We present Mediscape, an interactive ocean soundscape modulated by brainwave data to teach awareness of breathing to novices. Through an exploratory study with 20 participants, we collected interview and questionnaire data on their experience with Mediscape and impact on their stress and wellbeing. Findings revealed the complex nature of the meditation experience for novices, analysed as key themes of shifting state, attention, self-regulation strategy, and immersion. Preliminary design guidelines are proposed to assist designers in creating interactive soundscapes for breath-awareness meditation, through consideration of how sound can be used for rhythmic entrainment of breathing, information on the state of meditation, and the creation of immersive environments.
... Illustrative are the plan analyses [159] and post-occupancy evaluations [160]. Since Ulrich demonstrated the influence of the environment on patient recovery [6], it has been widely applied in healthcare spaces [161][162][163][164][165][166]. One of the reasons that EBD is so widely used is that it is available for any organisation [167]. ...
Conference Paper
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Space influences our cognitive-emotional state. In teaching spaces, with a considerable effect on performance. Many design variables are involved. Among them, geometry has been traditionally less explored despite its usual prominence in design, due to the complexity of its modification in existing physical classrooms. However, today this can be addressed through the use of virtual reality. This was the objective of the present study: to contribute to the study of the cognitive effect of different geometry parameters applied in a university classroom. It was tackled through a laboratory field study carried out with 80 university students. The geometry variable was studied through two parameters: ceiling heigh (3 settings) and width (3 settings) of the university classroom. The 9 combinations were implemented in a virtual reality. The cognitive effect was explored through memory and attention performances. Both of them, quantified through auditory psychological tasks: the former, using a list of words to memorize; and the latter, using a computer program to measure reaction times and errors. Analyses indicate that memory and attention can be affected by some of the geometry parameters. This suggests that they may be especially relevant in the design of university classrooms, which is of interest to the different agents involved in the university classroom project and design.
... For example, individuals who listened to music embedded in a public place were more likely to judge that space as positive and comfortable [2], and background music in hospital waiting rooms, surgical wards, and intensive care units was found to alleviate patients' perioperative distress (e.g., anxiety and psychological pain) [3,4]. While environmental music can contribute to a pleasant atmosphere and maintain or elicit desired emotional responses from users of those spaces [5], it can also impact physiological states [6]. For instance, background music has been used in medical settings to stabilize patients' physiological responses (e.g., heartbeat, blood pressure, respiratory rate, and cortisol levels) that impact recovery from illness [7,8]. ...
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There is growing interest in identifying the environmental factors that contribute to individuals’ perceptions of safety and sense of well-being in public spaces. As such, this study examined how music listening during nighttime walking influenced female university students’ psychological state and perceptions of their campus. A total of 178 female university students with a mean age of 23.0 years participated in this study. One group of 78 students listened to prerecorded music while walking across their campus at night, while the other 100 students did not listen to music during nighttime walking. Immediately following their nighttime walking, participants were asked to rate their psychological state, perceptions on the safety of their campus, and the music (only for the music-listening group). For the non-music-listening group, significant correlations were found between the perceived safety of the campus and psychological states (both anxiety and psychological distress); the correlations were not significant in the music-listening group. The results indicate that music can mediate psychological states, supporting the proactive use of music as a psychological resource for coping with their perceptions of adverse environments. Given the limitations of this preliminary study, further studies with controlled music listening conditions, type of music, and environmental issues are suggested.
... The researchers of that study also stated that clinicians should consider pleasant natural sounds perception as a low-risk nonpharmacological and unobtrusive intervention for speedier recovery of patients undergoing medical procedures. Moreover, studies have also shown that music and sound intervention in health care can have a positive effect on patient's emotions and even the recuperating processes [15]. However, details on how soundscapes impact patients and staff behaviour require further studies [16]. ...
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The world population is aging and more and more people suffer from dementia, which makes remembering and orientation in time and space difficult. Moreover dementia has a strong negative effect on the quality of living of the people suffering from it, but also of their relatives. In this paper, we investigate if and how the playback of carefully chosen and recognizable sounds, such as music, a clock tower, or nature sounds, can help these people and have a positive effect on the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). The selection and playback of these sounds, augmenting the existing soundscape, is performed in a personalized manner, since sounds can elicit a different response in different people. Caregivers can provide feedback on the soundscape based on the resident’s behavior and response to hearing the sounds. This allows a continuous adaptation of the soundscape. The soundscape system was tested with 19 people suffering from dementia and resident of 6 different nursing homes. Comparison of the nursing home environment before and after installation of the soundscape system showed that most residents (13/19) experienced this as an improvement of the sound environment.
... In recent years, research has also focused on art in hospitals, increasingly found not only in general zones but also in wards and patient rooms [7], [18], [19]. Some studies explore art in the context of the effects of sounds and music on health in hospital settings [20]. Hospital planning and design is studied in terms of Evidence-Based Design [21], [22]. ...
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The present paper shows the results of research on general zones in large European multispeciality hospitals. A dozen or so institutions, flagship examples of large contemporary hospitals, were selected for the study. The research focused on internal zones, in particular the reception area linked to the main communication system of the hospital which functions as a public space offering a range of services, and provides the space for communication , waiting and meetings. This work aims to determine design trends in the location and forms of general zones, their characteristics and proportion to other zones in hospitals, architectural features and functional-spatial solutions. The relationships between the shape of the hospital, its internal general zones, and their percentage share in the total building area were examined. Art and greenery in these zones were also investigated, along with the presence of natural lighting, the colours, and the type of finishing materials used in this type of space today. The study revealed noticeable differences between the form of general zones in large contemporary as well as 20 th-century hospitals. In addition to their form, the arrangement of zones has also changed, and they often do not resemble a hospital space. Art and greenery play an increasingly important role. The general zone is a hospital's essential communication hub, constituting the main public space where people may meet.
... Music interventions in dementia care that are not within the music therapy framework can be carried out by any professional involved in dementia care. Non-professional caregivers can also be trained to use music as an intervention or as a means to facilitate communication with people with a dementia diagnosis (Iyendo, 2016). In dementia care, both music therapy and other music-based interventions can have a broad range of objectives, either to improve cognition, memory retrieval or to affect specific symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and agitation (Ho et al., 2011;Cuddy et al., 2012;Meilan Garcia et al., 2012;Ing-Randolph, Phillips and Williams, 2015;Jacobsen et al., 2015). ...
... While the importance of soundscapes to the environment, health, and wellbeing is gradually being recognized by people, scientists and technicians are continuing to study the combination of soundscapes and music. Iyendo suggested that music-infused soundscapes could make patients more emotionally positive in hospitals [9]; playing soothing music was shown to reduce stress, blood pressure, and post-operative trauma when compared to silence in a hospital environment. Carvalho found that soundscapes that incorporated music could change taste feedback [10]. ...
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To explore a method of promoting college aesthetic education through campus environments, the Aesthetic Education Center of the Beijing Institute of Technology Zhuhai (BITZH-AEC) used the soundwalk method of soundscapes to carry out an experiment on students’ soundscape perceptions on campus. Half of the students who participated in the experiment (n = 42) had musical instrument learning experience and musical literacy. The research work used conventional statistical analysis methods and “Soundscapy”, newly developed by the British soundscape research team, to process the experimental data. It was found that the soundscape perception evaluation of students with musical literacy was different from that of ordinary students. This included a difference in the overall evaluation of the three experimental areas and a difference in the degree of dispersion of the soundscape evaluation of all six experimental areas. The study also found that there was no correlation between the acoustic noise level and the students’ evaluations of soundscape perception. BITZH-AEC proposes that aesthetic educators should pay attention to the idea of inspiring students to stimulate cultural imagination through soundscape perception.
... At the same time, music medical methods have also been widely studied and used in stroke, mental illness, and post-operative rehabilitation. [8] This article will conduct a systematic literature review of the current soundscape support for patients with dementia, aiming to determine the recent research progress in this field and understand the methods and results achieved by soundscapes designed for dementia patients. This literature review will summarise the previous research and aim to help related research in the future. ...
... Playing patient-selected music has been shown to reduce pain and ease anxiety (Kilic et al. 2015); in a separate study, listening to music helped reduce the amount of time that patients in acute care settings were maintained on mechanical ventilation (Liang et al. 2016). Numerous studies have also demonstrated the effects of aesthetics and the built environment on health (WHO 2021;Yin et al. 2020;Kondo et al. 2018;Lankston et al. 2010), leading hospitals, clinics, and educational settings to make increased efforts to consider and incorporate art, sound, biophilic design, and green spaces (Lankston et al. 2010;Iyendo 2016;Scott 2020;Franklin 2018;Lambert et al. 2017). In 2019, the World Health Organization (WHO) published an extensive scoping review regarding roles of art in addressing individual, community, and population health (Fancourt and Finn 2019), confirming a growing global interest in understanding and applying art and aesthetics for mental and physical well-being. ...
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The health and well-being impacts of art and aesthetic experiences have been rigorously studied by a range of disciplines, including cognitive neuroscience, psychiatry, public health, and translational clinical research. These experiences, encompassed in the concepts of set and setting, have long been claimed to be pivotal in determining the acute and enduring effects of psychedelic experiences. Responding to the field’s longstanding emphasis on the role and value of setting, a rapid scoping review was undertaken to identify the extent to which effects of setting and aesthetics on psychedelic experiences and therapies have been explicitly studied. It offers an analysis of the strengths and limitations of the extant literature and discusses evidentiary gaps as well as evidentiary opportunities for the field. The 43 included studies indicate apparent consensus regarding the importance of setting in psychedelic therapies, as well as consistent interest in theorizing about these effects. However, this consensus has yet to generate consistent, prospective, rigorous tests of setting and its complexities. As a result, the field continues to lack understanding or agreement regarding the effects of various specific elements of setting, the mechanisms by which they affect outcomes, for whom these effects occur, under what circumstances, given what conditions, and other critical factors. Further studies of setting and aesthetics in the context of psychedelic therapies are likely to not only improve these therapies and their delivery, but also inform considerations of setting and aesthetics for non-psychedelic interventions.
... Mantra chanting is a very ancient practice known to bring calmness, concentration and health to the body. Studies have suggested that music can show beneficial effect in relieving anxiety, depression, pain, blood pressure, fatigue in cancer patients improved immunity and memory (Bradt et al., 2016;Iyendo, 2016). Tibetan chant has improved recovery time after hypothermal exposure in snail lacking auditory organs (Pereira, 2016). ...
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Sound plays a critical role in all life forms in one way or the other. Higher organism such as vertebrates have evolved sophisticated auditory organs to perceive as well as emit specific range of sound frequencies. Extensive studies have been done on implication of sound in animal kingdom. Plants at the other side lack specialized organs for the same, which makes them mysterious as well as interesting subjects. In recent years significant advancement has been made towards understanding of sound emission and perception in plants. Through this review an attempt is made to unveil the current advancements in plant acoustics, its significance in overcoming the environmental challenges, biotic threats, facilitating pollination, inter-kingdom communication for mutual benefits and learning by association. Along with this, the application of sound in boosting plant growth, yield, enhancing functional metabolite production, evading pests and postharvest management has been emphasized. In this respect, several examples are presented to strengthen our understanding of plant responses to sound at behavioural, physiological and molecular level. At last, in the light of existing knowledge, we discuss current challenges in plant acoustic research, ecological hazards associated with artificial sound wave treatments and plausible ways alleviate it.
... The relationship between music and health has been described by researchers [24]- [28]. In a narrative review, a researcher reported that compared to silence, use of soothing music could reduce stress and blood pressure among patients and caregiving nurses [29]. Music has been used in hospital setting among children, [30]- [33] in supportive cancer care, [34], [35] in psychiatric patients, [36] among the mentally retarded, [37] for the elderly for psychologic wellbeing, [38] in hospital waiting rooms, [39] for relieving anxiety in preoperative setting, [40] in intensive coronary care unit, [41] in anxiety care among the terminally ill [42], [43] and for anxiety and pain care [44]- [46]. ...
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Aim: To determine the opinion of operating theatre users on the role of operating theatre background music on theatre users and patients in tertiary health care facilities in Port Harcourt. Background: The relationship between music and health has been described by researchers. Music has been used in several hospital settings with effects which some consider beneficial and others harmful. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out among theatre users from March to June 2020 in two multispecialty tertiary healthcare facilities in Port Harcourt Nigeria. Using the convenience sampling method, data collected with pretested semi-structured questionnaires were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0. Results: One hundred and twenty-one (82.9%) respondents asserted to knowledge of relationship between music and stress hormone. 97 (66.4%) agreed that music has positive effect on workers in the operating theatre. One hundred and seventeen (80.1%) respondents were of the opinion that background music in the operating theatre is not a distraction, while 22 (15.1%) respondents felt otherwise. One hundred and forty-four (98.8%) respondents agreed to usefulness of background music while at work. High proportion of respondents who lack knowledge of the relationship between stress hormone and music had no preference for operating theatre background music and the relationship was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: Operating theatre background music is useful as opined by the majority of operating theatre staff, though its preference is low among those with less knowledge of the positive relationship between such music and stress hormones.
... These results are in line with previous research, which found that music plus ambient noise at comfortable levels of volume increases dining pleasure, while no music or a sound environment with music that is too loud has negative effects (Novak et al., 2010). It is worth noting that noise has both negative and positive aspects, and the absence of negative sound does not necessarily create a positive environment (Iyendo, 2016). Torresin et al. (2019) conducted a systematic review of positive indoor soundscapes; among their findings, specific sound types (i.e., natural sounds and sounds from residential areas) were found to reduce annoyance caused by disturbing tonal noises. ...
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Against the background of weakening face-to-face social interaction, the mental health of college students deserves attention. There are few existing studies on the impact of audiovisual interaction on interactive behavior, especially emotional perception in specific spaces. This study aims to indicate whether the perception of one’s music environment has influence on college students’ emotion during communication in different indoor conditions including spatial function, visual and sound atmospheres, and interior furnishings. The three-dimensional pleasure–arousal–dominance (PAD) emotional model was used to evaluate the changes of emotions before and after communication. An acoustic environmental measurement was performed and the evaluations of emotion during communication was investigated by a questionnaire survey with 331 participants at six experimental sites [including a classroom (CR), a learning corridor (LC), a coffee shop (CS), a fast food restaurant (FFR), a dormitory (DT), and a living room(LR)], the following results were found: Firstly, the results in different functional spaces showed no significant effect of music on communication or emotional states during communication. Secondly, the average score of the musical evaluation was 1.09 higher in the warm-toned space compared to the cold-toned space. Thirdly, the differences in the effects of music on emotion during communication in different sound environments were significant and pleasure, arousal, and dominance could be efficiently enhanced by music in the quiet space. Fourthly, dominance was 0.63 higher in the minimally furnished space. Finally, we also investigated influence of social characteristics on the effect of music on communication in different indoor spaces, in terms of the intimacy level, the gender combination, and the group size. For instance, when there are more than two communicators in the dining space, pleasure and arousal can be efficiently enhanced by music. This study shows that combining the sound environment with spatial factors (for example, the visual and sound atmosphere) and the interior furnishings can be an effective design strategy for promoting social interaction in indoor spaces.
... Illustrative are the plan analyses [159] and post-occupancy evaluations [160]. Since Ulrich demonstrated the influence of the environment on patient recovery [6], it has been widely applied in healthcare spaces [161][162][163][164][165][166]. One of the reasons that EBD is so widely used is that it is available for any organisation [167]. ...
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Humans respond cognitively and emotionally to the built environment. The modern possibility of recording the neural activity of subjects during exposure to environmental situations, using neuroscientific techniques and virtual reality, provides a promising framework for future design and studies of the built environment. The discipline derived is termed “neuroarchitecture”. Given neuroarchitecture’s transdisciplinary nature, it progresses needs to be reviewed in a contextualised way, together with its precursor approaches. The present article presents a scoping review, which maps out the broad areas on which the new discipline is based. The limitations, controversies, benefits, impact on the professional sectors involved, and potential of neuroarchitecture and its precursors’ approaches are critically addressed.
... Playing background music (BGM) is a familiar stress reduction method to make an individual feel comfortable 16) . In health care, music therapy has been used in the field of psychiatry. ...
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Objectives: We investigated whether playing background music (BGM) in the workplace had any effects on overtime hours. Methods: In 15 workplaces, we used a crossover design and alternated between 2 months with and without BGM for 8 months. Using the attendance management records of the company, we documented overtime hours during the observation and the previous year. BGM was played at the end of working hours (A), from 15:00 to the end of work (B), and from beginning to the end (C) in each of the five arbitrarily selected offices. To evaluate the effect on overtime hours, we used a paired t-test to compare the mean overtime between periods with and without BGM and repeated analysis of variance to compare the changes in the trend of overtime in the same months between the observation year and the previous year by an interaction effect. Results: Patterns A, B, and C consisted of 625, 536, and 573 employees, respectively. The mean overtime hours for 4 months were significantly decreased in one ( − 4.3%), two ( − 19.2% and − 10.7%), and three ( − 11.8%, − 16.8%, and − 4.4%) offices, respectively. Furthermore, the trend of overtime between the observation year and the previous year significantly changed in one (1/5), one (1/5), and three (3/5) offices, in patterns A, B, and C, respectively. Conclusions: There were offices that showed less overtime when playing BGM, particularly the entire day, than when BGM was not played. This pilot study suggests that conducting more extensive research in this area is worthwhile.
... Jensen (2016) noted that sounds in tourism should be revalued and animated relevant researches "by utilising the localised, sensuous and embodied act of listening." Even though there are already some studies on soundscape, most of them focus on acoustics (Axelsson, Nilsson, & Berglund, 2010), environment psychology (Pheasant, Fisher, Watts, Whitaker, & Horoshenkov, 2010), and nursing and health (Iyendo, 2016). The relation between soundscape and experience had not been discussed, though it is essential as sound is an important part of environment, especially in tourism scene Waitt & Duffy, 2010). ...
Article
This paper explores how soundscape and landscape influences tourism experience by the cases of Leshan Giant Buddha and Mount Emei, China. Results show that there is a mutually positive relationship between soundscape perception and landscape perception; soundscape perception indirectly affect tourism experience through “the congruence between soundscape and landscape”; and only landscape can directly affect shallow experience. This study also brings implications for tourism research and practice: soundscape should be given more attention as it can significantly affect the tourism experience, and relevant industrial sectors can improve tourism experiences through the design or control of soundscape.
Chapter
This chapter presents both real experiences of interventions in health care environments and a rich collection of projects. All the experiences and projects are joined with a description of the goals and, when possible, of the obtained results.
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Acoustic experiences of nature represent a growing area in restorative environments research and are explored in this narrative literature review. First, the work surveyed indicates that nature is broadly characterised by the sounds of birdsong, wind, and water, and these sounds can enhance positive perceptions of natural environments presented through visual means. Second, isolated from other sensory modalities these sounds are often, although not always, positively affectively appraised and perceived as restorative. Third, after stress and/or fatigue nature sounds and soundscapes can lead to subjectively and objectively improved mood and cognitive performance, as well as reductions in arousal, although some inconsistencies in findings are observed. Fourth, theoretical frameworks of restorative environments would benefit from inclusion of acoustic environmental properties such as sound intensity or frequency. Fifth, findings regarding positive, learned semantic associations with nature have arisen as a result of recent work on sounds and restoration. This represents another important area of potential theoretical development for broader restorative environments research.
Article
Purpose To evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of music intervention on postoperative nausea and vomiting in the first 24 hours after surgery. Design A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Methods The study was conducted according to recommendations from Cochrane Handbook. The studies were selected based on PICOS inclusion and exclusion criteria. The revised Cochrane risk-of-bias tool for randomized trials was used for bias assessment and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement was used for reporting the study. Data was analyzed using the Comprehensive Meta-analysis version 3 software. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was conducted using both fixed and random-effect models. Findings There were 576 patients in the seven studies who met the inclusion criteria. The number of participants ranged from 58 to 163. Music was implemented in postoperative, intraoperative, and perioperative periods. Meta-analyses revealed that music interventions significantly reduced postoperative vomiting (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.63, Z = 2.07, P < 0.05, Hedge's g = 0.32), and had no statistical significant effect on postoperative nausea (95% CI: −0.13 to 0.70, Z = 1.34, P > 0.05, Hedge's g = 0.28). Conclusion Music intervention is effective in decreasing postoperative vomiting. Music intervention can be applied by healthcare professionals and the patients. However, more studies are still necessary to estimate the effects of postoperative nausea and vomiting and to increase the amount of available evidence. Study registration number CRD42020209691
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The pharmaceutical approach to skin disease has been hugely successful, but despite effective drugs being available and used, there are still vast numbers of people who continue to have some level of persisting skin disease and continue to experience quality of life (QoL) impairment. So the question that needs to be answered, while we await further advances in our drug‐based armamentarium, is how can we improve patients’ QoL, beyond drugs? A working group was formed from members of the EADV Task Force on QoL and Patient Oriented Outcomes. Participants were asked to suggest all the ways in which they considered patients’ QoL may be improved beyond medicines. Four groups of management approaches that may improve QoL in dermatology were identified: interventions within the dermatology service (hospitalization, multidisciplinary teams, patch testing and establishing relevant allergens and education), external services (corrective make‐up, climatotherapy and balneotherapy), psychological (psychological intervention, cognitive therapy, hypnosis), lifestyle (lifestyle behavioural changes, religion and spirituality and music). The ultimate aim of therapy is to eradicate a disease in an individual and return the person’s life to normal. But until the day comes when this has been achieved for every skin disease and for every patient there will be a need to support and assist many patients in additional non‐pharmaceutical ways. These ‘adjuvant’ approaches receive too little attention while dermatologists and researchers strive for better pharmacological therapy. The different ways in which patients may benefit have been reviewed in our paper, but the reality is that most have a very poor evidence base. The research challenges that we have to meet are to identify those approaches that might be of value and to provide evidence for their optimal use. In the meantime, clinicians should consider the use of these approaches where QoL remains impaired despite optimal use of standard therapy.
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Treatment of resting muscle tension through transdermal sound waves of specific wavelengths
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How are relations of care and security between hospital staff and patients organized through sound? This article argues that the shifting distinction between meaningful sound and noise is fundamental to the lived experience of immersion in organizational acoustic environment. Based around a qualitative study of listening practices and ‘ear work’ at a medium-secure forensic psychiatric hospital, using interview and photo-production methods, the article positions the organizing of the sensory as central to formal organization. Analysis of empirical material demonstrates how the refinement of key listening practices is critical to the ways in which staff and patients orient to the hospital setting. It also details how the design process for the unit has undermined the capacity to manage and control through sound, or ‘panauralism’, rendering it as a reversible and contested struggle to make sense of the acoustic environment, and describes the attempts by patients to create alternative acoustic spaces and exercise ‘sonic agency’. We contend that ‘acoustic organizational research’ offers an experience-near means of mapping organizational space and power relations and invites a renewed questioning of the role of the sensory as form of organizing in itself.
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This article explores sound in the hospital environment, using the drawing of lines to understand sound as process and agent in spaces of wellbeing. It builds on and extends the work of Tim Ingold on lines and sounds, exploring lines/sound in relation to the specific context of healthcare spaces. The article presents the methodology, process, and interpretation of lines from a workshop called ‘Listening to the Hospital’ as part of the research project ‘Sensing Spaces of Healthcare’. It focuses on engagement with recorded sounds from hospitals, showing that line-drawing might be productive in specific ways. The process aids an understanding of how sound shapes hospital ‘affective atmospheres’, and it can encourage participants to engage in close and empathetic listening. We argue that these routes to understanding are also potential routes to improving the wellbeing of people in hospitals, whether through hospital design or care. We also offer line-drawing as a valuable methodological and theoretical tool for scholars interested in embodied experiences of listening, of atmospheres and wellbeing, and sound.
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Sound artists and musicians understand sound’s impact on health and well-being; their knowledge can make a difference in the planning and construction of healthy cities. As immersive sound experience designers at Charles Morrow Productions LLC, the authors have created numerous installations for health and well-being throughout the world. In our professional experience, however, communicating our knowledge about the importance of sound to visually-oriented professionals who design and manage urban spaces can be a challenge. In this article, we outline our learnings in order to develop principles for visualizing sonic environments that can help decision-makers to listen to and with us. We speculate that such visualizations may aid other sound artists and designers to generate interest for sound among diverse stakeholders.
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Abstract This study examined the severity of the impacts of loud music sounds on the sustainability performance of buildings across three main cities in Anambra State Nigeria. Being a survey research, questionnaires were distributed to the users and occupiers of different classes of buildings in the study area. The survey results were analysed using means score index and severity index percent. The study found that loud music sounds severely affect the sustainability performance of buildings socially, environmentally, economically and technically with average means scores and severity index percent ranging from 3.73 to 4.64 and 54.89% to 100% respectively. The study further found that there was no significant difference in the severity of the impacts of loud music sounds on the sustainability performance of the buildings between the three main cities in Anambra State except for social sustainability which was due to differences in the social status of the three cities. Based on this, the study calls for change in the design and construction of buildings that would incorporate the provisions of National Building Code as regards to sound control in buildings. It suggested a review and reactivation of existing zoning laws and policies in the State, and a need to borrow a leaf from Lagos State Government by enacting a law against noise pollution. It further suggested promotion of acoustic practices that would improve sustainability performance of the buildings and reduce the consequential effects of music sounds in buildings. Keywords Building Performance, Loud Music, Music Acoustics, Music Impact, Sustainability
Article
Background: This paper explores the environmental, interpersonal, and personal outcomes of music performance in a hospital oncology setting. An original, qualitative research study examined the impact of live music for staff, patients, and carers. Methods: Data were collected using a multi-method approach of observations and semi-structured interviews and were analysed using inductive and theory-driven theming that was shaped by a determinants of health framework. Results: The research found that live music promoted stronger relationships and calmer environments, among other environmental, social and individual outcomes. Improved communication between staff through the creation of a more supportive environment was a pertinent finding of the research. No negative effects were reported. Conclusions: We discuss research findings in the context of relevant literature and suggest recommendations for future hospital-based live music programs. Results of this study indicate that live music interventions impacted individual, interpersonal, social and environment factors that led to health and wellbeing outcomes for participants.
Article
SARS-CoV-2 pandemic generated a profound impact on people's health, emphasizing the relevance of healthy lifestyles. Recommendations on how to maintain adequate physical activity, diet, sleep and social connection have been issued. However, it is worth expanding our look to other possible elements related to lifestyles such as the relationship with technology, nature, pets and music. These areas should be included in the assessment and intervention from this perspective. To achieve changes, the values, beliefs, intentions, motivations, risk/benefit balances, capacity for self-regulation, previous history of changes and the person's sense of competence in relation to the possible changes that are being suggested, should be assessed. Individualized and contextualized suggestions that increase the intention of change should be made, avoiding confrontation and generalizations. Although there are still areas of uncertainty in this approach, particularly in relation to dosage and mechanisms of action, its development should be encouraged, given its great potential in terms of cost-effectiveness.
Article
Over the last decades, an increasing amount of attention has been given to the acoustical environments of health care settings. Through innovative multi-disciplinary research and practice, sound in health care is being conceptualised as an object to be measured, controlled and minimised to improve individual well-being and health outcomes. Among the settings and populations being addressed are people living with dementia in residential long-term care. The trend toward acoustical separation between people overlooks the social possibilities of sound in care settings. This paper argues that we should resist narrow conceptualisations of sound as unwanted noise that must be reduced, and that sound should still be considered as a social tool. Drawing upon fieldwork in a Canadian long-term care facility among people living with dementia, ethnographic vignettes illustrate the significance of sound for selfhood and social relationship. Tensions between institutional control and acoustical agency are discussed, as well as implications for biomedical understandings of dementia as a loss of self. The paper concludes with a discussion of future research directions.
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xperimental Procedure: Measurements took place at Aalborg University Copenhagen, Denmark, in an anechoic chamber. Recruitment of the subjects was via social media and e-mails. All subjects were asked to complete two therapeutic blind test sessions, each one lasting approx. 60 minutes together with the measurements: during the first session they were listening to Melocura, a specially designed sound therapy of certain frequency – 432 Hz (Melocura, Denmark) and during the second session a normal relaxing piano music was played. Subjects sat on the edge of the flat bed, placed inside the anechoic chamber, and were initially measured using the mfBIA unit as explained earlier, after which an AMG recording was made for both muscles – here the subjects were asked to extend their arms to approx. 90 degrees from their torso and to press the palms of their hands together 3 times, thereafter they were asked to bend forward 3 times as far as they could comfortably manage. Subjects were measured two times at each session – before and after listening to sound therapy or normal relaxing music (NRM). The purpose was to observe, if there were any differences in muscle response to the NRM or Melocura sounds. The pulse was recorded for each subject Pre and Post both sound tests using a ChoiceMMed Pulse Oximeter (Bristol PA 19007, USA). Data Handling: The bioimpedance data were analyzed for the Centre Frequency (fc) and the Extracellular Resistance (Re), both of which were determined from the Cole-Cole plot. The intracellular resistance (Ri) was calculated from the formula: Ri = (Re x R∞/Re-R∞). Membrane Capacitance (Mc) was also calculated from the formula: fc = 1/(2π x Mc x (Re + Ri). A detailed analysis was finally performed at 50 kHz with measurement of Resistance (R) and Reactance (Xc), and a calculation of the Impedance (Z), where Z = Square Root (R2 + Xc2 ). Finally, so as to be able to compare between individuals of different body mass, the Phase Angle (PA) was calculated: PA = arctan (Xc/R) with units in degrees. The mfBIA parameters were interpreted in terms of muscle mass (Z, R), energy storage capacity/fibre size (Xc), hydration status (R, Re), tissue density/resting tension (fc), membrane activity/integrity (Mc) and metabolic activity (Ri). The AMG signal was analyzed in terms of its individual components Efficiency (E-score) and fibre recruitment, Temporal (T-score) and Spatial (S-score) summation, which are all mean values made for periods of physical activity, as outlined earlier. Statistics: All statistics were performed using GraphPad InStat 3 for Mac (Version 3.0b, 2003; Graph- Pad Inc., La Jolla, CA). Data were initially tested for normal distribution and equal variance, and then subsequently analyzed using an unpaired t-test. Differences between means with a P value > 0.05 were considered non-significant. Values are presented as the mean ± the standard error of the mean. Results: mfBIA: The data obtained from the mfBIA measurements for both the neck and back muscles can be seen in Table 1. It was found that subjects measured pre and post the two music tests, showed similar mfBIA parameters, which did not prove to be statistically significant from each other. AMG: The data obtained from the Acoustic Myography unit for both the neck and back muscles can be seen in Table 2. It was found that Melocura alone had a significant effect on both the E-score as well as the overall combined ESTi score. The overall ESTi score change was a 10.4% and 11.1% improvement, respectively compared with Pre- test values. Pulse: The Pulse measurements for the subjects in the Melocura test were; Pre 73.77  20.92 bpm and Post 67.15  16.45 bpm. For the normal relaxing music (NMR) test the values were; Pre 74.65  20.57 bpm and Post 65.50  21.75 bpm. For both tests the resting values were very similar and the Post values fell by 8% and 12%, respectively compared with Pre values. There was no significant difference between the two tests, nor any effect of treatment, despite a clear trend towards and fall in the pulse of the 26 subjects with both tests.
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Can music induce emotions directly and, if so, are these emotions experienced similarly to emotions arising in other contexts? This chapter analyzes these questions from the perspective of neuroscience. Despite the fact that music does not appear to have an obvious survival value for modern adults, research indicates that listening to music does activate autonomic, subcortical, and cortical systems in a manner similar to other emotional stimuli. It is proposed that music may be so intimately connected with emotional systems because caregivers use music to communicate emotionally with their infants before they are able to understand language. In particular, it examines whether music engages the autonomic nervous system, sub-cortical emotion networks, and cortical areas involved in the emotional processing of other types of stimuli. It also investigates whether emotional reactions to music are simply cultural conventions by asking whether and how infants process musical emotions.
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To examine the effects of sedative and stimulative music and music preference on stress reduction when participants are exposed to a stressor, 144 female music education students performed a stressful, mental arithmetic test. After the stress was induced successfully, participants were randomly assigned to four experimental groups. They listened to preferred sedative music, preferred stimulative music, unpreferred sedative music, and unpreferred stimulative music, respectively. Tension and state-anxiety levels were obtained after listening to music. The results revealed that participants who listened to sedative music showed significantly lower tension and state-anxiety levels than did those who listened to stimulative music when music was unpreferred. However, there was no significant difference of tension and state-anxiety levels between listening to sedative music and stimulative music when music was preferred. These findings demonstrate that the effects of sedative and stimulative music on stress reduction depend on music preference. Our study has important implications for the practice of clinical music therapy since it provides strong support for the use of preferred music when working to reduce patient stress.
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This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The objective of this review is to evaluate the effects of using music on pain experience, relief of pain, and analgesic requirement in conditions of acute, chronic, and cancer pain.
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In The Effects of Noise on Man, Karl Kryter emphasized that human reaction to sound is quantitatively related to the physical nature of sounds. He specified five unwanted characteristics of sound: “(a) the masking of unwanted sounds, particularly speech, (b) auditory fatigue and damage to hearing, (c) excessive loudness, (d) some general quality of bothersomeness or noisiness, and (e) startle.” Hospital soundscapes have been shown to demonstrate all five characteristics in one fashion or another. Some unwanted effects of sound have also been shown, such as fragmented sleep and recuperation, cardiovascular response, pain and intensive care delirium—however, few studies have been able to causally link sounds to patient outcomes and few examine detailed characteristics other than loudness. This paper will summarize what we know about noise in hospitals and the health effects on occupants, including highlights from the Healthcare Acoustics Research Team (HART) body of research. Results will be used to identify important areas for future research.
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This important document replaces the 1980 Environmental Health Criteria No.12 – Noise. It is destined to become widely used and quoted in relation to environmental noise problems. All who have even a passing involvement in this area must become familiar with it and with its recommended levels. The Report considers noise sources and their measurement, adverse effects on health and noise management, whilst introducing a new set of recommendations and guideline values to take account of changes in knowledge and expectations over the past 20 years. Attention is drawn to inadequacies of equivalent level for intermittent noises, to the need to consider effects of low frequency noise and to the rights of vulnerable sub-groups. The Guide can be viewed in full on the World Health Organisation website – www.who.org