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Factors That Explain Adolescent and Young Adult Mobile Game Play, Part 1: A Quantitative Examination of the Characteristics Describing the Casual Player

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Abstract

The first of two chapters, a study is presented that quantitatively examined the adolescent and young adult “casual” video game player. A total of 1,950 South Korean students self-reported their game play on mobile phones by answering a 92-item questionnaire designed to capture data on technology ownership; preference for game genre and titles; where and how often games were played; what factors influence game selection, what game features were the most desirable, the rationale behind playing games, and psychophysical changes experienced as a result of playing; as well as, spending habits with regard to game purchases. The findings supported many of the claims made about the casual player, revealing, for example, that mobile games are predominately played for short periods of time, in between activities, and as a means to combat boredom. Adding credence to the idea that mobile game play can be viewed as a casual activity. Results also revealed potentially positive benefits, to include improved mood and feelings of well-being along with better mental attention and focus.

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... Instead, they expressed interest in short quick games that resemble commonly known games in mobile phone applications (e.g., Temple Run) [39,40]. Adolescents may prefer short games because they offer immediate feedback on actions and decisions, sometimes within the same interactive environment, allowing for an immersive experience, and helping to sustain interest in content [41]. As a result, adolescents may begin to understand the consequences of smoking through the gaming experience. ...
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... To date, findings point to the instructional benefits of video games in the areas of computer science, geography, language, mathematics, photography, and science (). Advancements in mobile computing have helped pave the way for new video game research (DaCosta & Seok, 2017a, 2017b) in different areas of interest, to include social development, intellectual activities (Spikol & Milrad, 2008), and general learning (Facer et al., 2004;Rogers & Price, 2006). The anytime-, anywhere-, and onany-device characteristics of mobile technology are of particular importance because they offer new opportunities to research game-based learning (GBL) that is free from space and time restrictions (). ...
Chapter
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Chapter
The massive spread of mobile computing is undeniable with the draw of mobile games reaching epic proportions. This popularity, along with the anytime-, anywhere-, and on-any-device characteristics of mobile computing has ignited mounting interest in the use of mobile games in educational contexts, as illustrated by a growing number of articles on this topic. This chapter offers a review of the research on mobile game-based learning (mGBL), citing mobile games that have been experimented with and/or used to explore learning. Although many of the studies to date have emphasized the location-based capabilities of mobile devices, the emerging research focused on mGBL is promising, showing that learning can take place through the use of these games. Future research, however, should look beyond individual devices and functionality, and place greater importance on pedagogy.
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Article
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