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Local Food for Global Future

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Preface Nowadays it is generally recognized that the post World War II industrial agriculture and food in Western countries was succesful with regard to profit, but unsuccesful with respect to people and planet. The underlying structure was a linear economy and a poor interpretation of the sustainability paradigm. All efforts aimed at increasing production volumes and profits. The circular economy tries to reach a more efficient use of natural resources and less waste. In itself this is good, it possibly will pay attention to the planet, but people remain suffering. It will never result in a full interpretation of the sustainability paradigm. Social aspects, including food sovereignty and food safety, will not come into their own. What we need is a new economy with explicit naming of the sustainability aspects relevant to food: the paradigm of ‘sustainable food security’. Such a tailored paradigm is close to people. The base for it is in the local and regional economy. All peope are involved and nothing can be passed. In this book four of my earlier published articles are used and combined with new research. The Chapters 2, 3 and 4 deal with the drawbacks of the current industrial system of agriculture and food, the new paradigm of sustainable food security that is urgently needed and the potential of local and regional food systems to give this paradigm content. These three chapters are based on my article ‘Sustainable food security, A paradigm for local and regional food systems’, published in 2014 in International Journal of Humanities and Social Science. The Chapters 5 and 6 relate to practical examples. Chapter 5 highlights a case of regional agriculture at work in The Netherlands, derived from my article ‘Vechtdal Food Community, a Case of regional Agriculture in the Netherlands’, in 2008 published in Journal of Rural Development NIRD, Hyderabad, India. Chapter 6 focuses on family farming in Russia, which was published in 2014 in my article ‘Family Farming in Russian Regions, Small-scale agriculture and food supporting Russia’s food self-sufficiency’ in Small Business and Entrepreneurship Development. Chapters 7 and 8 relate to the classification and governance of local and regional food systems and are based on my article ‘Governance for local and regional food systems, in 2013 published in Journal of Rural and Community Development. Currently this is the top 2013 article of the Journals article ranking by hit rate. The content of Chapter 9 is based on new research, not published before. The author thanks many people who helped in producing this book. In particular I am indebted to Jill Crofton, Petra Crofton, Greet Goverde, Lout Jonkers, Marijke van Schendelen, Tatjana Vavilova, Joost Visser and Marc Wegerif. Harry Donkers Waalwijk, The Netherlands
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... Em torno do AIAF das Nações Unidas, outros autores analisam a construção de um novo paradigma em que a AF está no centro da construção de sistemas alimentares sustentáveis (ex.: Marsden & Morley, 2014). Referimonos, mais uma vez, à segurança alimentar, de vários pontos de vista (Donkers, 2015;Benton, 2016), no âmbito da qual uma certa AF não fica de fora de formas de "intensificação sustentável" (Pretty & Bharucha, 2014;Cook et al., 2015). Para se mostrar esta segurança como sustentável, debatem-se soluções em que a AF está no cerne das matérias da agroecologia e da soberania alimentar (Altieri, Nicholls, & Montalba, 2017;Gliessman, Friedmann, & Howard, 2019), envolvendo processos de resiliência (Córdoba Vargas et al., 2020) e uma forte aposta na dimensão social da sustentabilidade (Pereira et al., 2018). ...
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This is the main publication resulting from the Portuguese project “Family Farming and Sustainable Territorial Enhancement, in the context of Climate Change” (AFAVEL). With research carried out in 2020 and 2021 in mainland Portugal, it aimed to deepen the knowledge of family farming and related rural territories, studying support policies and evaluating conditions for their implementation, in order to promote processes of socio-territorial valorization, social innovation and integrated training of actors and agents of rural development handling the challenges of climate change.
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Article
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Conference Paper
Özet: Yöresel/yerel, bölgesel ve geleneksel tarım ve gıda ürünleri, tarım ve gıda ürünleri üretimi içinde önemli bir yere sahiptir. Tüketicilerin farklı algılarla bu ürünlere yönelik tutum ve tercihleri de tüketim artışını motive etmektedir. Uluslararası literatür, söz konusu ürünlere tüketicinin verdiği desteğin, büyük ölçüde gıda güvenliği, kalite ve çevresel kaygılar gibi faktörlerle bağlantılı olduğunu ortaya koymaktadır. Tüketici beklentilerinin karşılanabilmesinin yanı sıra, yöresel/yerel, bölgesel ve geleneksel ürünlerin üretim ve ticaretinin artması için de bu ürünlere ilişkin Coğrafi İşaret (Cİ) çalışmalarının yapılması önemli bir avantajdır. Cİ uygulamalarının yanı sıra, üretimlerinin ve tüketimlerinin ekonomik ve sosyal sürdürülebilirliği amacıyla yapılan araştırmalar için de bu ürünlerin tanım ve kapsamlarının netleştirilmesi önemlidir. Bu çalışmada; yöresel/yerel, bölgesel ve geleneksel gıda ürünlerinin tanım ve kapsamları ile birbirleriyle olan ilişkileri, uluslararası literatürden yararlanılarak değerlendirilmiştir. Abstract: Local, regional and traditional agricultural and food products have an important place in total agricultural and food products production. Consumers' attitudes and preferences towards these products with different perceptions also motivate the consumption increase. International literature reveals that consumer support for these products is largely related to factors such as food safety, quality and environmental concerns. It is an important advantage to carry out geographical indication studies in order to increase the production and trade of these products as well as meeting the expectations of the consumers. In addition to geographical indication applications, it is necessary to clarify the definitions and scopes of these products for researches conducted for the economic and social sustainability of their production and consumption. In this study, the definitions and scopes of local, regional and traditional agriculture and food products and their relations with each other are evaluated using international literature.
Chapter
The production, transportation, consumption and waste of food has been a “puzzling omission” in urban masterplanning (American Planning Association, introduction, 2007). The need to provide enough food for a growing urban population, which safeguards finite resources and respects the environment, is an urgent challenge.
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This handbook discusses public participation and social learning in river basin management. It has been written for water managers who are responsible for implementing the European Water Framework Directive. It contains ideas, approaches and methods for buiding up trust among the different stakeholders ; developing a common view on the issues at stake ; resolving conflicts ; arriving at joint solutions that are technically sound and implemented in pratice ; encouraging "active involvement of all interested parties" in river basin management as required by the European Water Framework Directive (WFD). This handbook will also be of interest to others involved in river basin management or in other types of natural resources management.
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Presentation
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In the years since publication of the first edition of Food Wars much has happened in the world of food policy. This new edition brings these developments fully up to date within the original analytical framework of competing paradigms or worldviews shaping the direction and decision-making within food politics and policy. The key theme of the importance of integrating human and environmental health has become even more pressing. In the first edition the authors set out and brought together the different strands of emerging agendas and competing narratives. The second edition retains the same core structure and includes updated examples, case studies and the new issues which show how these conflicting tendencies have played out in practice over recent years and what this tells us about the way the global food system is heading. Examples of key issues given increased attention include: nutrition, including the global rise in obesity, as well as chronic conditions, hunger and under-nutrition the environment, particularly the challenges of climate change, biodiversity loss, water stress and food security food industry concentration and market power volatility and uncertainty over food prices and policy responses tensions over food, democracy and citizenship social and cultural aspects impacting food and nutrition policies.
Chapter
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Book
Western civilization has entered a new fundamental crisis that can be explained by a very one-sided orientation of social values based on materialism and egocentrism, which is disrupting the delicate balance between the opposing forces of ‘mind’ and ‘matter’, and of ‘I’ and ‘the others’. Many sources – from the great works of philosophy, religion, art and culture to social surveys and the course of history – qualify sustainability as the dynamic equilibrium between fundamental opposing forces. This insight and the ethical ability to better discriminate between stabilizing and destabilizing forces would allow further justification of human rights and new institutional arrangements in society at large and, in particular, in politics, economy and fi nance. It would enable a sustainable civilization to flourish within the boundaries of freedom and human dignity.
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Article
Introduction Governance, treated as a social function centered on efforts to steer or guide societies toward collectively beneficial outcomes and away from outcomes that are collectively harmful, is one of the great issues of every era. Thomas Hobbes, writing in the midst of the civil strife and turmoil of mid-seventeenth-century England emphasized the need to establish and maintain order (Hobbes 1660/1999). He assumed that individuals would engage in a struggle for power, concluded that life in the absence of effective regulatory arrangements would degenerate into a war of all against all, and called for the adoption of a social contract granting far-reaching authority – and the capacity to exercise it – to a central government. Writing during a period of political reform and economic prosperity in the second half of the eighteenth century, Adam Smith took a different tack (Smith 1776/1937). He started from the premise that individuals seek to enhance their own welfare and counted on the operation of the market to solve many coordination problems. Nevertheless, he assigned to governance the role of providing a stable system of rights and rules needed to allow commerce to flourish and to avoid or manage business cycles and financial fluctuations. Approaching these issues in the aftermath of the imperial wars that dominated European politics in the early years of the nineteenth century, Peter Kropotkin emphasized the dangers arising from the actions of powerful governments and came to believe in the virtues of anarchy (Kropotkin 1902/1986).