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Simple Measurement of the Properties of a Distributed Resistor-Capacitor Line

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Abstract

An expression is derived that allows the resistance and capacitance per unit length in a distributed resistance-capacitance line to be determined with one measurement of AC current at a single frequency. These distributed structures occur frequently in semiconductor electronics and determine the device frequency response. The method is intended for cases such as engineering failure analysis of existing designs where measurement options are limited

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