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This chapter offers a series of dialogues beginning with interconnections—and distinctions—between cultural evolutionary approaches and developmental psychology approaches. The second set of dialogues identifies and maps the convergences and divergences between postformal reasoning and postformal pedagogies, including an analysis of the extent to which Kincheloe and Steinberg’s core postformal characteristics align with my theorised postformal reasoning qualities. I then begin a more complex mapping of all of the above relationships to explore how the postformal reasoning qualities and postformal pedagogies intersect with the four evolutionary themes discussed in Chapter 5. Finally, I distil four core pedagogical values: love, life, wisdom and voice—the heart of my postformal education philosophy, which supports the development of higher stages of reasoning.

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