The Farm Game: A Game Designed to Follow Children’s Playing Maturity

Conference Paper · May 2016with 47 Reads
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-55834-9_3
Issn: 1867-8211
Cite this publication
Abstract
This paper presents the design, implementation and deployment of a new version of the popular farm game as deployed within an Ambient Intelligence (AmI) simulation space. Within this space, an augmented interactive table and a 3D avatar are employed to extend the purpose and objectives of the game, thus also expanding its applicability to the age group of preschool children from 3 to 6 years old. More importantly, through the environment, the game, which builds on knowledge stemming from the processes and theories used in Occupational Therapy and activity analysis, becomes capable of monitoring and following the progress of each young player, adapt accordingly and provide important information regarding the abilities and skills of the child and their development over time.

Do you want to read the rest of this conference paper?

Request Full-text Paper PDF
    • Lev S. Vygotsky
    In speaking of play and its role in the preschooler's development, we are concerned with two fundamental questions: first, how play itself arises in development — its origin and genesis; second, the role of this developmental activity, which we call play, as a form of development in the child of preschool age. Is play the leading form of activity for a child of this age, or is it simply the predominant form?
    • E Zidianakis
  • Conference Paper
    • Emmanouil Zidianakis
      Emmanouil Zidianakis
    • Danai Ioannidi
      Danai Ioannidi
    • Margherita Antona
      Margherita Antona
    • Constantine Stephanidis
      Constantine Stephanidis
    This paper presents a novel framework, called Bean, which aims to monitor, evaluate and enhance pre-school children’s skills and abilities through playing in Ambient Intelligence environments. The framework includes: (i) a model of children development based on the ICF-CY model and the Denver - II assessment tool, aiming at early detection of children’s potential developmental issues to be further investigated and addressed if necessary; (ii) a reasoning mechanism for the automated extraction of child development knowledge, based on interaction monitoring, targeted to model relevant aspects of child’s developmental stage, maturity level and skills; (iii) content editing tools and reporting facilities for parents and therapists. The framework has been implemented in the context of an AmI environment for supporting children play in AmI, deploying a collection of augmented artifacts, as well as a collection of digital reproductions of popular games.
  • Conference Paper
    • Emmanouil Zidianakis
      Emmanouil Zidianakis
    • George Papagiannakis
      George Papagiannakis
    • Constantine Stephanidis
      Constantine Stephanidis
    Nowadays, users are able to interact with digital content using their mobile devices almost everywhere and anytime due to the increased power, portability, and ubiquitous connectivity of mobile devices. This paper presents the design and implementation of a novel, remotely controlled for the purposes of edutainment and instructor-student interaction, three-dimensional full body avatar gamification framework. The main innovation introduced focuses on multi-presence gamified educational scenarios in multiple desktop computers and mobile devices. Thus the remotely-controlled avatar can act as a guide, assistant or information presenter for novel, cross-platform Ambient Intelligence (AmI) edutainment scenarios. In detail, the avatar's role depends on the requirements of the AmI client applications as these are propagated remotely (using remote procedure calls). Examples of remote function invocations include real-time 3D biped skinned animations, text-to-speech, producing facial expressions and presenting multimedia content.
  • Conference Paper
    • Emmanouil Zidianakis
      Emmanouil Zidianakis
    • Ioanna Zidianaki
      Ioanna Zidianaki
    • Danai Ioannidi
      Danai Ioannidi
    • Constantine Stephanidis
      Constantine Stephanidis
    Play development is part of the child’s growth and maturation process since birth. Games in general, and technologically augmented games in particular, can play a fundamental role in this process. This paper introduces the design, implementation and deployment of a new version of the popular Tower Game integrated within an Ambient Intelligence (AmI) simulation space, based on knowledge stemming from the processes and theories used in occupational therapy. An augmented interactive table and a three-dimensional avatar are employed in order to extend the purpose and objectives of the game, so that its applicability expands to the age group of preschool children from 3 to 6 years old. Various augmented artifacts, such as force-pressure sensitive interactive surface, and augmented pen, and a digital dice are integrated in the environment, aiming to enhance children’s play experience. Through such augmented artifacts, the game becomes capable of monitoring and following the progress of each young player, adapt accordingly and provide important information regarding the abilities and skills of the child and his development growth progress over time.
  • Conference Paper
    • Ping Wang
      Ping Wang
    • Tracy L. Westeyn
    • Gregory D. Abowd
    • James Rehg
      James Rehg
  • Conference Paper
    • Emmanouil Zidianakis
      Emmanouil Zidianakis
    • Nikolaos Partarakis
      Nikolaos Partarakis
    • Margherita Antona
      Margherita Antona
    • Constantine Stephanidis
      Constantine Stephanidis
    In the context of Ambient Intelligence (AmI), the elaboration of new interaction techniques is becoming the most prominent key to a more natural and intuitive interaction with everyday things [2]. Natural interaction between people and technology can be defined in terms of experience: people naturally communicate through gestures, expressions, movements. To this end, people should be able to interact with technology as they are used to interact with the real world in everyday life [19]. Additionally, AmI systems must be sensitive, responsive, and adaptive to the presence of people [16]. This paper presents the design and implementation of an interaction framework for ambient intelligence targeting to the provision of novel interaction metaphors and techniques in the context of AmI scenarios. The aforementioned infrastructure has been deployed in vitro within the AmI classroom simulation space of the FORTH-ICS AmI re- search facility and used to extend existing applications offered by an augmented interactive table for young children (Beantable) to support also games that fa- cilitate biometric information, rich interaction metaphors and speech input [20].
  • An augmented interactive table supporting preschool children development through playing
    • E Zidianakis
    • M Antona
    • G Paparoulis
    • C Stephanidis
    Zidianakis, E., Antona, M., Paparoulis, G., & Stephanidis, C.: An augmented interactive table supporting preschool children development through playing. In Proceedings of the 2012 AHFE International Conference (4th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics), pp. 744-753 San Francisco, California, USA (2012)
  • Article
    • Virginia M. Axline
    An introduction to children with emotional problems is followed by discussions of the non-directive play therapy situation and participants: the playroom and suggested materials, the child, the therapist, and the parent or parent-substitute as an indirect participant. The eight basic principles of non-directive therapy are considered along with problems in establishing rapport, accepting the child completely, establishing a feeling of permissiveness, recognizing and reflecting feelings, maintaining respect for the child, allowing the child to lead the way, not hurrying therapy, and knowing the value of limitations. Implications for education mentioned are practical schoolroom application of non-directive methods and application to parent-teacher relationships and to teacher-administrator relationships. Annotated therapy records from cases of children aged 4 to 12 years are presented. (LE)
  • Article
    • Sara Price
      Sara Price
    • Yvonne Rogers
    • Mike Scaife
    • Helen Neale
    Tangibles, in the form of physical artefacts that are electronically augmented and enhanced to trigger various digital events to happen, have the potential for providing innovative ways for children to play and learn, through novel forms of interacting and discovering. They offer, in addition, the scope for bringing playfulness back into learning. To this end, we designed an adventure game, where pairs of children have to discover as much as they can about a virtual imaginary creature called the Snark, through collaboratively interacting with a suite of tangibles. Underlying the design of the tangibles is a variety of transforms, which the children have to understand and reflect upon in order to make the Snark come alive and show itself in a variety of morphological and synaesthesic forms. The paper also reports on the findings of a study of the Snark game and discusses what it means to be engrossed in playful learning.
  • Conference Paper
    Full-text available
    • Javier Marco
      Javier Marco
    • Eva Cerezo
      Eva Cerezo
    • Sandra Baldassarri
      Sandra Baldassarri
    • Janet C. Read
      Janet C. Read
    Taking computer technology away from the desktop and into a more physical, manipulative space, is known that provide many benefits and is generally considered to result in a system that is easier to learn and more natural to use. This paper describes a design solution that allows kindergarten children to take the benefits of the new pedagogical possibilities that tangible interaction and tabletop technologies offer for manipulative learning. After analysis of children's cognitive and psychomotor skills, we have designed and tuned a prototype game that is suitable for children aged 3 to 4 years old. Our prototype uniquely combines low cost tangible interaction and tabletop technology with tutored learning. The design has been based on the observation of children using the technology, letting them freely play with the application during three play sessions. These observational sessions informed the design decisions for the game whilst also confirming the children's enjoyment of the prototype.
  • Article
    • Paul Marshall
    Conceptual work on tangible interfaces has focused primarily on the production of descriptive frameworks. While this work has been successful in mapping out a space of technical possibilities and providing a terminology to ground discussion, it provides little guidance on the cognitive or social effects of using one type of interface or another. In this paper we look at the area of learning with tangible interfaces, suggesting that more empirically grounded research is needed to guide development. We provide an analytic framework of six perspectives, which describes latent trends and assumptions that might be used to motivate and guide this work, and makes links with existing research in cognitive science and education.
  • Article
    • Julie A. Kientz
      Julie A. Kientz
    The care of individuals with concerns about development, health, and wellness is often a difficult, complicated task and may rely on a team of diverse caregivers. There are many decisions that caregivers must make to help ensure that the best care and health monitoring are administered. For my dissertation work, I have explored the use of embedded capture and access to support decision-making for caregivers. Embedded capture and access integrates simple and unobtrusive capture and useful access, including trending information and rich data, into existing work practices. I hypothesized that this technology encourages more frequent access to evidence, increased collaboration amongst caregivers, and decisions made with higher confidence. I have explored this technology through real world deployments of new embedded capture and access applications in two domains. For the first domain, I have developed two applications to support decision-making for caregivers administering therapy to children with autism. The first application, Abaris, supports therapists working with a single child in a home setting, and the second application, Abaris for Schools, extends the ideas of Abaris for use in a school setting for many teachers working with multiple children. The second domain I have explored is decision-making for parents of newborn children. In particular, I developed and evaluated embedded capture and access technology to support parents, pediatricians, and secondary childcare providers in making decisions about whether a child s development is progressing normally in order to promote the earlier detection of developmental delays. Ph.D. Committee Chair: Abowd, Gregory; Committee Member: Ackerman, Mark; Committee Member: Grinter, Rebecca; Committee Member: Mynatt, Elizabeth; Committee Member: Rodden, Thomas
  • Article
    • W K Frankenburg
    • JB Dodds
    • Archer PA
    • B Bresnick
    Since the Denver Developmental Screening Test was first published 23 years ago, it has been utilized worldwide and restandardized in more than a dozen countries. Concerns raised through the years by test users about specific items and features of the Denver Developmental Screening Test, coupled with a need for more current norms, have prompted a major revision and restandardization of the test. For the revision, 336 potential items were administered to more than 2000 children. The average number of times each item was administered was 540. Using regression analysis, composite norms for the total sample and norms for subgroups (based on gender, ethnicity, maternal education, and place of residence), were used to determine new age norms. The final selection of the 125 Denver II items was based on the following criteria: ease of administration and scoring, item appeal to child and examiner, item test-retest and inter-rater reliability, minimal "refusal" scores, minimal "no opportunity" scores, minimal subgroup differences, and a smooth step-like progression of ages at which 90% of children could perform the tasks. The major differences between the Denver II and the Denver Developmental Screening Test are: 1) an 86% increase in language items; 2) two articulation items; 3) a new age scale; 4) a new category of item interpretation to identify milder delays; 6) a behavior rating scale; and 7) new training materials.
  • Article
    • Mike Ananny
    This paper presents the theory, design and evaluation of a new type of computer-supported collaborative interface intended to help young children practice certain oral language skills critical for later written literacy acquisition. Based on a theory of "emergent literacy", this paper describes a toy -- TellTale -- designed to let young children create, share and edit oral language in a way similar to how they will eventually create written language. One user study was conducted with children of different socio-economic strata. Their use of TellTale suggested that children of different SES seem to use different social and linguistic strategies to establish cohesion and that purely syntactic measures of narrative coherence are not sensitive enough to reveal all aspects of children's collaborative language construction. A second pilot study investigated how groups of children used TellTale during oral language play; while the results are not conclusive, they seem to suggest that TellTale is an engaging interface for group authorship.
  • Article
    Full-text available
    • Hiroshi Ishii
      Hiroshi Ishii
    • Brygg Ullmer
      Brygg Ullmer
    This paper presents our vision of Human Computer Interaction (HCI): "Tangible Bits." Tangible Bits allows users to "grasp & manipulate" bits in the center of users' attention by coupling the bits with everyday physical objects and architectural surfaces. Tangible Bits also enables users to be aware of background bits at the periphery of human perception using ambient display media such as light, sound, airflow, and water movement in an augmented space. The goal of Tangible Bits is to bridge the gaps between both cyberspace and the physical environment, as well as the foreground and background of human activities. This paper describes three key concepts of Tangible Bits: interactive surfaces; the coupling of bits with graspable physical objects; and ambient media for background awareness. We illustrate these concepts with three prototype systems -- the metaDESK, transBOARD and ambientROOM -- to identify underlying research issues. Keywords tangible user interface, ambient media, gras...