Conference Paper

Privacy Threat Model in Lifelogging

Conference Paper

Privacy Threat Model in Lifelogging

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Abstract

The lifelogging activity enables a user, the lifelogger, to passively capture multimodal records from a first-person perspective and ultimately create a visual diary encompassing every possible aspect of her life with unprecedented details. In recent years it has gained popularity among different groups of users. However, the possibility of ubiquitous presence of lifelogging devices especially in private spheres has raised serious concerns with respect to personal privacy. Different practitioners and active researchers in the field of lifelogging have analysed the issue of privacy in lifelogging and proposed different mitigation strategies. However, none of the existing works has considered a well-defined privacy threat model in the domain of lifelogging. Without a proper threat model, any analysis and discussion of privacy threats in lifelogging remains incomplete. In this paper we aim to fill in this gap by introducing a first-ever privacy threat model identifying several threats with respect to lifelogging. We believe that the introduced threat model will be an essential tool and will act as the basis for any further research within this domain.

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... There are other works, as presented in [16,17,18,19], which discuss and present a threat model in lifelogging, mathematical representation of identity and trust issues. Even though they are not strictly related to the scope of current paper, we have drawn motivations on how to model an attack from these works. ...
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... As a consequence, they observed that such capture of private spaces as well as the presence of specific objects in images made users concerned about their privacy. Similar privacy concerns with images showing specific objects or taken at particular locations, but also portraying other known people, bystanders or user activities, have also been observed by other studies [16,24,27]. Price et al. [39] noticed that users are less concerned in sharing images with a group of other lifeloggers than with non-lifeloggers, further suggesting that this could re-define what a private space means when lifelogging in a group. ...
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... With these gaps in mind, we have made the following contributions in our previous work [4]: ...
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A privacy by design approach to lifelogging
  • C Gurrin
  • R Albatal
  • H Joho
  • K Ishii
Gurrin, C., Albatal, R., Joho, H., & Ishii, K. (2014). A privacy by design approach to lifelogging. Digital Enlightenment Yearbook 2014: Social Networks and Social Machines, Surveillance and Empowerment, 49.
Digital Enlightenment Yearbook 2014: Social Networks and Social Machines Surveillance and Empowerment 49
  • C Gurrin
  • R Albatal
  • H Joho
  • K Ishii