Conference Paper

Exploring Lifelog Sharing and Privacy

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Abstract

The emphasis on exhaustive passive capturing of images using wearable cameras like Autographer, which is often known as lifelogging has brought into foreground the challenge of preserving privacy, in addition to presenting the vast amount of images in a meaningful way. In this paper, we present a user-study to understand the importance of an array of factors that are likely to influence the lifeloggers to share their lifelog images in their online circle. The findings are a step forward in the emerging area intersecting HCI, and privacy, to help in exploring design directions for privacy mediating techniques in lifelogging applications.

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... Interestingly, we do not always share captured data publicly but just store it on a personal storage [33] (some statistics are shown in Appendix A), and such private data contains various moments of everyday life that are not found in publicly shared data [4,12,32,36]. Accessing exten-sive amounts of private data could lead to tremendous advances in computer vision and AI technology. ...
... Specifically, let Θ be the RHS of Equation (12), which is known when R(·) is identified and γ t , λ is estimated. Then, when using some specific loss functions we can solve ∇w t (z t ,w t ) = Θ for z t as follows: ...
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... Their results were partly confirmed by Price et al., who, however, found no significant differences in sharing when a screen was present [Price et al. 2017]. Chowdhury et al. found that whether lifelogging imagery is suitable for sharing is (in addition to content, scenario, and location) mainly determined by its sensitivity [Chowdhury et al. 2016]. Ferdous et al. proposed a set of guidelines that, among others, include semi-automatic procedures to determine the sensitivity of captured images according to user-provided preferences [Ferdous et al. 2017]. ...
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... Their results were partly confirmed by Price et al. who, however, found no significant differences in sharing when a screen was present [38]. Chowdhury et al. [10] found that whether lifelogging imagery is suitable for sharing is (in addition to content, scenario, and location) mainly determined by its sensitivity. Ferdous et al. proposed a set of guidelines that, amongst others, include semi-automatic procedures to determine the sensitivity of captured images according to userprovided preferences [14]. ...
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... Interestingly, we do not always share captured data pub- licly but just store it on a personal storage [32], and such pri- vate data contains various moments of everyday life that are not found in publicly shared data [5,11,31,33]. Accessing extensive amounts of private data could lead to tremendous advances in computer vision and AI technology. ...
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