Chapter

Fuzzy Confidence Regions

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Abstract

Confidence regions are usually based on exact data. However, continuous data are always more or less non-precise, also called fuzzy. For fuzzy data the concept of confidence regions has to be generalized. This is possible and the resulting confidence regions are fuzzy subsets of the parameter space. The construction is explained for classical statistics as well as for Bayesian analysis. An example is given in the last section.

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... Several researchers have afterwards proposed refined definitions of fuzzy confidence intervals. For instance, Viertl and Yeganeh [22] proposed a definition of the so-called confidence regions. Their main application was in the Bayesian context. ...
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Chapter
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