Conference PaperPDF Available

Evaluation of the chemical composition of the herb mexican giant hyssop (Agastache mexicana (Kunth. Link.&Epling) - medicinal and spice plant

Authors:
Wydział Lekarski z Oddziałem Nauczania w Języku Angielskim oraz Wydział Nauk
o Zdrowiu Pomorskiego Uniwersytetu Medycznego w Szczecinie,
Wydział Kształtowania Środowiska i Rolnictwa, Wydział Biotechnologii i Hodowli
Zwierząt oraz Wydział Nauk o Żywności i Rybactwa Zachodniopomorskiego
Uniwersytetu Technologicznego w Szczecinie,
Polskie Towarzystwo Przyrodników im. Kopernika – Oddział Szczeciński
oraz Sekcja Nauk o Człowieku,
Polskie Towarzystwo Lekarskie – Sekcja Ekologiczna,
Polskie Towarzystwo Medycyny Środowiskowej – Oddział Zachodniopomorski
II Międzynarodowa Konferencja „Ekologia człowieka”
II International Conference ‘HUMAN ECOLOGY’
Szczecin, 9
th
10
th
June 2016
32
Evaluation of the Chemical Composition of the Herb Mexican Giant Hyssop
(Agastache mexicana (Kunth.) Link.&Epling) - Medicinal and Spice Plant
Kamila Bojko
1
, Paula Jadczak
2
, Aneta Wesołowska
3
1
Department of Horticulture,
2
Department of Genetics, Plant Breeding and Biotechnology,
3
Institute
of Chemistry and Environmental Protection, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin
e-mail: kamila-bojko@zut.edu.pl
Introduction. Mexican giant hyssop (Agastache mexicana (Kunth.) Link.&Epling.) is a high,
acervate perennial plant of Lamiaceae family giving off a strong tea scent. Other common names
include toronjiil morado, rojo, colorado, nahuatl, tepehua (Spanish) (Cantino et al. 1992). Aromatic,
anise-scented leaves or herb of giant hyssop are used for seasoning or in medicine to support cardiac
performance and improve the condition of blood vessels. They may be also used to soothe cough,
diarrhea, fever and in wound healing. Flower infusion administered by inhalation is soothing and
improves sleep (Estrada-Reyes et al. 2004, 2014). All so far investigated Agastache species are
similar in phytochemical terms. Their essential oils contain compounds of two different classes, i.e.
phenylpropanoids and terpenoids (Zielińska and Matkowski 2014). The aim of the study was to
determine the content and composition of the essential oil isolated from Mexican giant hyssop
(Agastache mexicana) via hydrodistillation in Deryng and Clevenger-type apparatus.
Material and methods. The experiment was conducted in 2014 at the West Pomeranian
University of Technology in Szczecin. The herb of Mexican giant hyssop (Agastache mexicana
(Kunth.) Link.&Epling.) was grown in a greenhouse. It was harvested in the last decade of July, at
the beginning of anthesis. Dried herb was used to determine the content of the essential oil and its
chemical composition by means of gas chromatography. The results were subjected to the two-
way analysis of variance statistic. Significance of differences was assessed using Tukey’s test by
calculating of semi confidence intervals LSD (least significance difference) at significance level
of 0.05. Statistical analysis was performed for the components the content of which exceeded 3%.
Results and discussion. Hydrodestillation apparatus did not significantly affect either the
content or the chemical composition of the essential oil in Mexican giant hyssop herb (Table 1).
Mean content of the essential oil was 2.258%. In both cases, the essential oil was found to
contain 44 compounds that accounted for 99.23% of all compounds for Deryng apparatus and
99.18% for Clevenger apparatus (Table 2). The major components of the essential oil were
pulegone (48.63%), limonene (15.69%), (Z)-menthone (13.07%), and (E)-menthone (3.03%).
This work was subjected to review
33
Table 1. Essential oil content in herb of giant hyssop (Agastache mexicana) depending on the type
of distillation apparatus
Distillation apparatus Essential oil content (%)
Deryng 2.255
Clevenger 2.261
Mean 2.258
LSD
0,05
not significant
Table 2. The content of some constituents of essential oil of giant hyssop (Agastache mexicana)
depending on the type of distillation apparatus
Distillation apparatus (Factor II)
Deryng Clevenger
Essential oil constituent (Factor I) RI Mean (%) Mean (%) Mean (%)
Pulegon / Pulegone 1249 47.77 49.49 48.63
Limonen / Limomene 1030 15.93 15.46 15.69
cis-Menton / (Z)-Menthone 1168 12.89 13.26 13.07
trans-Menton / (E)-Menthone 1155 2.90 3.18 3.04
Mean 19.87 20.34 20.11
LSD
0,05
for:
Factor I 0.414
Factor II not significant
Interaction 0.398
RI: retention indices relative to n-alkanes (C
7
-C
40
) on the HP-5MS colum
References
1. Cantino P.D., Harley R.M., Wagstaff S.J. 1992. Genera of Labiatae: status and classification. In:
Harley R.M., Reynolds T. (eds.) Advances in Labiatae Science. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, UK
2. Estrada-Reyes. R, Hernández E.A, Garcia-Argáez A., Hermández M.S., Linares E., Bye R., Heinze
G., Martinez-Vázquez M. 2004. Comparative chemical composition of Agastache mexicana subs.
mexicana and A. mexicana subs. xolocotiziana. Biochem. System. Ecol. 32, 685-694.
3. Estrada-Reyes. R, López-Rubalcava C., Ferreyra-Cruz O.A., Dorantes-Barrón A.M., Heinze G.,
Aguilar J.M., Martinez-Vázquez M. 2014. Central nervous system effects and chemical composition of
two subspecies of Agastache mexicana; an ethnomedicine of Mexico. J. Ethnopharmacol. 153, 98-110.
4. Zielińska S., Matkowski A. 2014. Phytochemistry and bioactivity of aromatic and medicinal plants
from the genus Agastache (Lamiaceae). Phytochem. Rev. 13, 391–416.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
Full-text available
Agastache is a small genus of Lamiaceae, comprising 22 species of perennial aromatic medicinal herbs. In this article, we review recent advances in phytochemical, pharmacological, biotechnological and molecular research on Agastache. The phytochemical profile of all Agastache species studied to date is generally similar, consisted of two main metabolic classes-phenylpropanoids and terpenoids. In the relatively variable essential oils, most populations of different Agastache species contain over 50 % of a phenylallyl compound-estragole. Also, other volatile compounds (methyleugenol, pulegone, menthone, isomenthone and spathulenol) were reported in various proportions. Major non-volatile metabolites belong to phenolic compounds, such as caffeic acid derivatives, especially rosmarinic acid as well as several flavones and flavone glycosides like acacetin, tilianin, agastachoside, and a rare dimeric malonyl flavone (agastachin). Two unique lignans-agastenol and agastinol-were also isolated. Terpenoids include triterpenoids of oleanane-type (maslinic acid, oleanolic acid and β-amyrin), ursane-type (ursolic acid, corosolic acid and α-amyrin), and typical plant sterols, as well as abietane-type oxidized diterpenes (e.g., agastaquinone, agastol, and others). The bioactivity of various extracts or individual compounds in vitro and in vivo include antimicrobial, antiviral and anti-mutagenic activity, cytotoxic activity to cancer cell lines, and anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenic, antioxidant as well as biocidal activity to several foodstuff pests. Biotechnological and molecular studies have focused on in vitro propagation and enhancing the biosynthesis of bioactive metabolites in cell or organ cultures, as well as on the expression of genes involved in phenolic biosynthesis.
Article
Agastache mexicana subspecies mexicana (Amm) and xolocotziana (Amx) are used in Mexican traditional medicine to relief cultural affiliation syndromes known as "susto" or "espanto", for "nervous" condition, and as a sleep aid. Despite its intensive use, neuropharmacological studies are scarce, and the chemical composition of the aqueous extracts has not been described. 1) To analyze the chemical composition of aqueous extracts from aerial parts of Amm and Amx. 2) To evaluate the anxiolytic-like, sedative, antidepressant-like effects. 3) Analyze the general toxic effects of different doses. Anxiolytic-like and sedative effects were measured in the avoidance exploratory behavior, burying behavior and the hole-board tests. The antidepressant like actions were studied in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. Finally, general activity and motor coordination disturbances were evaluated in the open field, inverted screen and rota-rod tests. The acute toxicity of Amm and Amx was determined by calculating their LD50 (mean lethal dose). The chemical analyses were performed employing chromatographic, photometric and HPLC-ESI-MS techniques. Low doses of Amm and Amx (0.1 to 1.0mg/kg) induced anxiolytic-like actions; while higher doses (over 10mg/kg) induced sedation and reduced the locomotor activity, exerting a general inhibition in the central nervous system (CNS). Results support the use of Amm and Amx in traditional medicine as tranquilizers and sleep inducers. Additionally, this paper contributes to the knowledge of the chemical composition of the aqueous extracts of these plants.
Article
A comparative chemical analysis of Agastache mexicana subsp. mexicana and A. mexicana subsp. xolocotziana reveals that their methanol extracts constituents were very similar, with acacetin and (2-acetyl)-7-O-glucosyl acacetin being the most abundant compounds obtained. These results are consistent with the information reported for other species of Agastache. However, GS-MS analyses showed that methyl chavicol, limonene and linalool were the main constituents of the essential oils of A. mexicana subsp. mexicana, while pulegone, menthone and isopulegone were the major constituents found in A. mexicana subsp. xolocotziana. Furthermore, a different composition was found in their respective hexane extracts. These chemical composition dissimilarities between the two taxa support their recognition as distinct subspecies.
Genera of Labiatae: status and classification
  • P D Cantino
  • R M Harley
  • S J Wagstaff
Cantino P.D., Harley R.M., Wagstaff S.J. 1992. Genera of Labiatae: status and classification. In: Harley R.M., Reynolds T. (eds.) Advances in Labiatae Science. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, UK
Comparative chemical composition of Agastache mexicana subs. mexicana and A. mexicana subs. xolocotiziana
  • Hernández R E A Estrada-Reyes
  • A Garcia-Argáez
  • M S Hermández
  • E Linares
  • R Bye
  • G Heinze
  • M Martinez-Vázquez
Estrada-Reyes. R, Hernández E.A, Garcia-Argáez A., Hermández M.S., Linares E., Bye R., Heinze G., Martinez-Vázquez M. 2004. Comparative chemical composition of Agastache mexicana subs. mexicana and A. mexicana subs. xolocotiziana. Biochem. System. Ecol. 32, 685-694.