Article

Efficacy and Tolerability of a Skin Brightening/Anti-Aging Cosmeceutical Containing Retinol 0.5%, Niacinamide, Hexylresorcinol, and Resveratrol

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Abstract

Consumers are increasingly interested in over-the-counter skin care products that can improve the appearance of photodamaged and aging skin. This 10-week, open-label, single- center study enrolled 25 subjects with mild to moderate hyperpigmentation and other clinical stigmata of cutaneous aging including fine lines, sallowness, lack of clarity, and wrinkling. Their mean age was 53.4±7.7 years. The test product contained retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide 4.4%, resveratrol 1%, and hexylresorcinol 1.1% in a moisturizing base. Subjects were provided a skin care regimen including a cleanser, hydrating serum, moisturizer, and an SPF 30 sunscreen for daily use. The test product was applied only at night. The use of this skin brightening/anti-aging cosmeceutical was found to provide statistically significant improvements in all efficacy endpoints by study end. Fine lines, radiance, and smoothness were significantly improved as early as week 2 ( P <.001). By week 4, hyperpigmentation, overall skin clarity, evenness of skin tone, and wrinkles showed statistically significant improvement compared to baseline. Mild retinoid dermatitis including flaking and redness occurred early in the study as reflected by tolerability scores. By week 10, subjects reported no stinging, itching, dryness, or tingling. The results of this open-label clinical study suggest that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(7):863-868.

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... 2% gold silk sericin, 5% nicotinamide, 0.1% signaline TM (diacylglycerol and fatty alcohols) [137] An open-label, single-center study 25 0.5% retinol, 4.4% nicotinamide, 1% resveratrol, and 1.1% hexylresorcinol Treatment at night for 10 weeks. ...
... Several other clinical trials have evaluated the efficacy of cosmetics containing nicotinamide and several other active ingredients (silk sericin, diacylglycerol, fatty alcohols, retinol, resveratrol, hexylresorcinol, and/or stem cell culture medium) [136][137][138]. These products showed a wrinkle improvement effect in common, and certain products were evaluated to have improvement effects on skin moisture, skin barrier, elasticity, surface morphology, skin clarity, and/or pigmentation [136][137][138]. ...
... Several other clinical trials have evaluated the efficacy of cosmetics containing nicotinamide and several other active ingredients (silk sericin, diacylglycerol, fatty alcohols, retinol, resveratrol, hexylresorcinol, and/or stem cell culture medium) [136][137][138]. These products showed a wrinkle improvement effect in common, and certain products were evaluated to have improvement effects on skin moisture, skin barrier, elasticity, surface morphology, skin clarity, and/or pigmentation [136][137][138]. Again, it is difficult to estimate the contribution of nicotinamide to the clinical trial results obtained using the combination formulation. ...
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... Also, a moisturizing base containing 4.4% niacinamide + 0.5% retinol + 1% resveratrol + 11% hexylresorcinol improved hyperpigmentation by week 4 when compared to baseline in 25 subjects with mild-to-moderate hyperpigmentation. 29 Reports suggest its role in prevention of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH; Table 1). 30 ...
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... The discrepancies may be partially explained by multicomponent composition of the supplements in both studies. The same interpretation problem may arise from the study on topical formulation containing resveratrol, retinol, niacinamide, and hexylresorcinol [143]. Although the study confirmed effectiveness in combating numerous skin aging symptoms, it cannot attribute this effect directly to resveratrol. ...
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... Unter Hautalterung versteht man den allmählichen, kumulativen Verlust bestimmter Eigenschaften der jugendlichen Haut, die für Merkmale wie Straffheit, Dehnbarkeit, Elastizität und Pigmentierung verantwortlich sind [4,5]. [98]. Da sowohl in dieser als auch in der anderen erwähnten Studie jeweils eine Formulierung mit mehreren potenziellen Wirkstoffen getestet wurde und Studiendaten zu der Einzelsubstanz bislang fehlen, kann Resveratrol bei dermaler Applikation derzeit noch keine durch In-vivo-Untersuchungen belegte Wirksamkeit gegen Hautalterung bescheinigt werden. ...
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