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Vocal repertoire of Scinax v-signatus (Lutz 1968) (Anura, Hylidae) and comments on bioacoustical synapomorphies for Scinax perpusillus species group

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Abstract

Herein we describe the vocal repertoire of Scinax v-signatus, compare it to the other species belonging to the S. perpusillus species group and discuss the bioacoustical synapomorphies proposed for the group. We recorded an advertisement call and an aggressive call of S. v-signatus. The advertisement call is similar to the one described for others species of the Scinax perpusillus group. Similarly to Scinax cosenzai, the first note in the advertisement call of S. v-signatus is the longest. The aggressive call was preceded by a series of advertisement calls. We suggest that bioacoustical parameters proposed as synapomorphies for the Scinax perpusillus group are not valid, as they are also observed in species belonging to other groups within the genus.

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