Conference Paper

RLL - Reliable Low Latency Broadcast Data Dissemination in Dense Wireless Lighting Control Networks

Authors:
  • Philips Lighting BV, Eindhoven Netherlands
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Abstract

The increased introduction of individually wirelessly controlled LED light sources in conjunction with the need to retrofit those into existing buildings often leads to very dense wireless lighting networks. Current approaches for control message transmission in such systems are based on broadcasting messages among the many luminaires. However, adequate communication performance, in particular, sufficiently low latency and message reception synchronicity, is difficult to ensure in such networks. This paper introduces a novel data dissemination protocol for such networks, which makes use of the recently introduced IEEE802.15.4e TSCH mode. The analysis of our protocol shows that it can fulfil the requirements for dense wireless lighting control networks in achieving adequately low message delivery latency, high reliability and fulfilling user expectations.

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