Article

Lignocellulosic supply chain MILP model: a Hungarian case study

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Abstract

The optimal design of lignocellulosic-based products (i.e. biofuels and platform chemicals) production systems represent a key components in the development of biobased economies. A crucial part of such complex problems is the use of efficient decision-making tools, enabling a proper evaluation of the potential investment options. The study of the economical sustainability of advanced biorefineries requires a holistic optimisation approach along the entire biorefining supply chain (i.e. biomass cultivation, storage, transportation, processing as well as products storage and delivery) over the long-term in order to simultaneously achieve a full exploitation of lignocellulosic biomass (and its macrocomponents) as well as to identify the optimal logistics and configurations of the biorefining network. In this paper, a maximum profit-based mixed integer linear programming modelling framework is developed to assess the systematic design and planning of a spatially explicit, multi-feedstock, multi-period and multi-echelon lignocellulosic biomass-to-biobased products supply chain. A Hungarian real case study is proposed to demonstrate the feasibility of the model. Results show the effectiveness of the model as a decision-making tool for the biorefinery design, highlighting the major cost drivers.

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... In addition, there are options for incorporating storage facilities (S) in between the stages and each stages are interconnected with modes of transport (T). The detailed description of the entire case study based in Hungary has been elaborated in Panteli et al. (2016). ...
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... In addition, there are options for incorporating storage facilities (S) in between the stages and each stages are interconnected with modes of transport (T). The detailed description of the entire case study based in Hungary has been elaborated in Panteli et al. (2016). ...
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