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Tretanorhinus mocquardi (Swamp Snake) [Geographic Distribution]

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TRETANORHINUS MOCQUARDI (Swamp Snake). ECUADOR: PROVINCE OF ESMERALDAS: Atacames (00º52’12”N, 79º50’32”W, 8 m elev), 13 and 25 February 1990, V. Cevallos and E. Kramer. Universidad San Francisco de Quito & Fundación Herpetológica G. Orcés, Quito, Ecuador (FHGO-USFQ 121–5, 187; collected at night in water, at a shrimp pond near coastline). Verified by J.-M. Touzet. The species was known from Panama, with no records from Colombia (Dunn 1939. Copeia [4]: 212–217; Peters and Orejas-Miranda 1970. USNM Bull. 297). Uetz (1995–2005. The EMBL Reptile Database. Online. EMBL Heidelberg. <http://www.reptile-database.org>) mentioned the species from Ecuador, citing Almendáriz (1992 [1991]) In Barriga et al. [eds.], Lista de Vertebrados de Ecuador. Revista Politécnica, Quito XVI [3]: 89–162); however, the author does not mention the species in that paper, nor subsequent lists (Coloma et al. 2000–2004. Reptiles de Ecuador. Online. Museo de Zoología, PUCE Quito, Ecuador. <http://www.puce.edu.ec/zoologia/>). First vouchered country record. Extends known distribution ca. 900 km S from nearest localities in Panama (Dunn op. cit.).
Herpetological Review 36(3): 340; 2005
© 2005 by Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles
TRETANORHINUS MOCQUARDI (Swamp Snake). ECUA-
DOR: PROVINCE OF ESMERALDAS: Atacames (00º52’12”N,
79º50’32”W, 8 m elev), 13 and 25 February 1990, V. Cevallos and
E. Kramer. Universidad San Francisco de Quito & Fundación
Herpetológica G. Orcés, Quito, Ecuador (FHGO-USFQ 121–5,
187; collected at night in water, at a shrimp pond near coastline).
Verified by J.-M. Touzet. The species was known from Panama,
with no records from Colombia (Dunn 1939. Copeia [4]: 212–217;
Peters and Orejas-Miranda 1970. USNM Bull. 297). Uetz (1995–
2005. The EMBL Reptile Database. Online. EMBL Heidelberg.
<http://www.reptile-database.org>) mentioned the species from
Ecuador, citing Almendáriz (1992 [1991]) In Barriga et al. [eds.],
Lista de Vertebrados de Ecuador. Revista Politécnica, Quito XVI
[3]: 89–162); however, the author does not mention the species in
that paper, nor subsequent lists (Coloma et al. 2000–2004. Rep-
tiles de Ecuador. Online. Museo de Zoología, PUCE Quito, Ecua-
dor. <http://www.puce.edu.ec/zoologia/>). First vouchered country
record. Extends known distribution ca. 900 km S from nearest
localities in Panama (Dunn op. cit.).
Submitted by DIEGO F. CISNEROS-HEREDIA, Colegio de
Ciencias Biológicas & Ambientales, Universidad San Francisco de
Quito, Ave. Interoceánica y calle Diego de Robles, Campus
Cumbayá, Edif. Maxwell. Casilla Postal 17-12-841, Quito,
Ecuador (e-mail: diegofrancisco_cisneros@yahoo.com)
... mocquardi) that correspond to two specimens deposited in the Museo de Herpetología Universidad de Antioquia (MHUA), Medellín, Colombia, and which are listed by the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) (Daza 2018). Although T. mocquardi is a species expected to occur in Colombia since its known distribution includes Panama and Ecuador (Cisneros-Heredia 2005), its presence has not been recorded in the literature and information regarding the two presumptive records might contain uncertainties (Maldonado et al. 2015;Marshall and Strine 2019;Chapman et al. 2020). Data from online databases must be curated both taxonomically and geographically to guarantee reliability (Marshall and Strine 2019). ...
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Many aspects of the biology of various snake species remain unknown, and the extent of this lack of information is not always clear. As new research usually depends upon previous findings, the gaps in our knowledge and the accuracy of published information are of major importance. Therefore, an analysis of all available information on snakes of the genus Tretanorhinus, from both the literature and museum specimens, is presented here to illuminate existing knowledge gaps. The database compiled from 87 documents referring to snakes of this genus and 755 specimens held in scientific collections revealed major gaps and contradictory information for all four species of this genus. Data on morphology, ecology, and natural history are completely absent for T. mocquardi and T. taeniatus, whereas confusing distribution reports exist for T. nigroluteus. The potential consequences of these problems were determined, and some suggestions for correcting them are addressed. Specifically, we consider that focused efforts on the validation of current species and subspecies, field and lab studies of ecology and behavior, and estimations of population dynamics, are necessary.
The species was known from Panama, with no records from Colombia (Dunn 1939
  • J.-M Verified
  • Touzet
Verified by J.-M. Touzet. The species was known from Panama, with no records from Colombia (Dunn 1939. Copeia [4]: 212–217;
USNM Bull. 297) Uetz
  • Orejas-Miranda Peters
Peters and Orejas-Miranda 1970. USNM Bull. 297). Uetz (1995–
Universidad San Francisco de Quito & Fundación Herpetológica G. Orcés, Quito, Ecuador (FHGO-USFQ 121–5, 187; collected at night in water
  • E Kramer
E. Kramer. Universidad San Francisco de Quito & Fundación Herpetológica G. Orcés, Quito, Ecuador (FHGO-USFQ 121–5, 187; collected at night in water, at a shrimp pond near coastline).
Universidad San Francisco de Quito & Fundación Herpetológica G. Orcés, Quito, Ecuador (FHGO-USFQ 121-5, 187
  • E Kramer
E. Kramer. Universidad San Francisco de Quito & Fundación Herpetológica G. Orcés, Quito, Ecuador (FHGO-USFQ 121-5, 187; collected at night in water, at a shrimp pond near coastline).
  • Orejas-Miranda Peters
Peters and Orejas-Miranda 1970. USNM Bull. 297). Uetz (1995-