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Enyalioides cofanorum (Cofan Wood Lizard), Reproduction.

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ENYALIOIDES COFANORUM (Cofan Wood Lizard), REPRODUCTION. Enyalioides cofanorum is a terrestrial hoplocercid known from the Amazonian lowlands of Ecuador and Peru. A female collected from Santa Cecilia, Ecuador in March 1972 had two ovarian eggs (ca. 26 mm long) and another collected in July contained two oviductal eggs (ca. 28 mm long) (Duellman. 1978. Misc. Publ. Mus. Nat. Hist. Univ. Kansas 65:1–352). Five adult females collected at Santa Cecilia averaged 104 mm snout-vent length (SVL; range: 91–115 mm; Duellman 1973. Herpetologica 29:228–231). Here, I augment the limited data on this species with observations made in eastern Amazonian Ecuador. On 31 July 2001, a female E. cofanorum was collected resting horizontally on a branch 0.5 m above ground in primary terra firme forest at the Tiputini Biodiversity Station (0°37'05"S, 76°10'19"W; elev. 215 m). This field station, managed by the Universidad San Francisco de Quito, is located 280 km ESE of Quito on the north bank of the Tiputini River next to Yasuni National Park, Orellana Province, Ecuador (Cisneros-Heredia. 2003. In De la Torre and Reck. [eds.], Ecología y Ambiente en el Ecuador: Mem. I Congr. Ecología y Ambiente, Ecuador país megadiverso. CD. Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador.). The lizard was gravid and dissection revealed five shelled eggs. Eggs had a mean length of 25.6 mm (24.9–26.0 mm), a mean width of 10.4 mm (10.0–11.3 mm), a mean mass of 1.8 g (1.7–1.9 g; total clutch mass = 9.1 g), and a mean volume of 1.5 cm3 (1.4–1.7 cm3). The lizard was 95.7 mm SVL, 120.8 mm tail length, and mass (without eggs) of 27.9 g. The female and eggs (DFCH-USFQ 0558) were deposited at the Universidad San Francisco de Quito. Based on these data, clutch size in E. cofanorum ranges from 2 to 5. This range is smaller, but overlaps that of E. laticeps, a sympatric arboreal/terrestrial congener with larger clutches (5-7 eggs, mean = 6.2), smaller eggs (15.0–16.6 mm, mean = 15.6 mm) and larger females (107–125 mm SVL, mean SVL = 114 mm; Duellman 1978, op. cit.;Vitt and De la Torre 1996. Research Guide Lizards of Cuyabeno. Mus. Zool. QCAZ-PUCE Monog. 1:1–165).
Herpetological Review 36(2): 176-177; 2005
© 2005 by Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles
ENYALIOIDES COFANORUM (Cofan Wood Lizard),
REPRODUCTION. Enyalioides cofanorum is a terrestrial
hoplocercid known from the Amazonian lowlands of Ecuador and
Peru. A female collected from Santa Cecilia, Ecuador in March
1972 had two ovarian eggs (ca. 26 mm long) and another collected
in July contained two oviductal eggs (ca. 28 mm long) (Duellman.
1978. Misc. Publ. Mus. Nat. Hist. Univ. Kansas 65:1–352). Five
adult females collected at Santa Cecilia averaged 104 mm snout-
vent length (SVL; range: 91–115 mm; Duellman 1973.
Herpetologica 29:228–231). Here, I augment the limited data on
this species with observations made in eastern Amazonian Ecuador.
On 31 July 2001, a female E. cofanorum was collected resting
horizontally on a branch 0.5 m above ground in primary terra firme
forest at the Tiputini Biodiversity Station (0°37'05"S, 76°10'19"W;
elev. 215 m). This field station, managed by the Universidad San
Francisco de Quito, is located 280 km ESE of Quito on the north
bank of the Tiputini River next to Yasuni National Park, Orellana
Province, Ecuador (Cisneros-Heredia. 2003. In De la Torre and
Reck. [eds.], Ecología y Ambiente en el Ecuador: Mem. I Congr.
Ecología y Ambiente, Ecuador país megadiverso. CD. Universidad
San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador.). The lizard was gravid and
dissection revealed five shelled eggs. Eggs had a mean length of
25.6 mm (24.9–26.0 mm), a mean width of 10.4 mm (10.0–11.3
mm), a mean mass of 1.8 g (1.7–1.9 g; total clutch mass = 9.1 g),
and a mean volume of 1.5 cm3 (1.4–1.7 cm3). The lizard was 95.7
mm SVL, 120.8 mm tail length, and mass (without eggs) of 27.9
g. The female and eggs (DFCH-USFQ 0558) were deposited at
the Universidad San Francisco de Quito.
Based on these data, clutch size in E. cofanorum ranges from 2
to 5. This range is smaller, but overlaps that of E. laticeps, a
sympatric arboreal/terrestrial congener with larger clutches (5-7
eggs, mean = 6.2), smaller eggs (15.0–16.6 mm, mean = 15.6 mm)
and larger females (107–125 mm SVL, mean SVL = 114 mm;
Duellman 1978, op. cit.;Vitt and De la Torre 1996. Research Guide
Lizards of Cuyabeno. Mus. Zool. QCAZ-PUCE Monog. 1:1–165).
I am grateful to Andres Leon, Leo Zurita and Susana Cardenas
for field companionship and assistance, and to Kelly Swing, Marc
Hayes, and Maria Elena Heredia for critically reading the
manuscript. I also thank Maria Elena Heredia and Laura Heredia
for financial and moral support. Tiputini Biodiversity Station-
Universidad San Francisco de Quito provided institutional, logistic
and financial support. The Ministry of Environment of Ecuador
provided the scientific research authorization Nº 19-IC-FAU-DFN.
This is publication No. 3 of the project “Study of the Herpetofauna
of the Tiputini Biodiversity Station” and contribution No. 2 of the
Laboratorio de Anfibios & Reptiles, Universidad San Francisco
de Quito.
Submitted by DIEGO F. CISNEROS-HEREDIA, Universidad
San Francisco de Quito, Ave. Interoceanica y Calle Diego de
Robles, Campus Cumbaya, Edif. Newton Plaza, office NP004. PO.
Box 17-12-841, Quito, Ecuador; e-mail:
diegofrancisco_cisneros@yahoo.com.
... Geographic coordinates were obtained for 288 localities using Global Gazetteer Version 2.1 (Falling Rain Genomics, Inc.), HerpNet (www.herpnet.org), the collections' databases, GPS data, or the literature (Corredor et al. 1985; Dixon & Soini 1986; Vanzolini 1986; Vitt & Caldwell 1993; Avila-Pires 1995; Harvey 1998; Dirksen & de la Riva 1999; Lips 1999; Quintana & Padial 2003; Reichle et al. 2004; Cisneros-Heredia 2005; Duellman 2005; Macedo et al. 2008; da Silva et al. 2009; Valdujo et al. 2009). Distribution maps were constructed in ArcMap 9.3 (ESRI, Inc.). ...
... 4) differed from the previous description in having a dark brown reticulate pattern on flanks; a dark brown stripe extending from eye to commisure of mouth; another dark brown stripe extending posteriorly from the dorsal margin of the orbit to a point above the tympanum; and light blue gular region lateral and anterior to the black gular mark.Duellman 1978). This species has been found active by day on the forest floor, inactive under logs, or sleeping head-up on sticks or horizontally on branches less than 1.5 m above the ground (Duellman 1978; Cisneros-Heredia 2005). ...
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