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Trachyboa boulengeri (Northern Eyelash Boa) [Geographic Distribution]

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TRACHYBOA BOULENGERI (Northern Eyelash Boa). ECUADOR: PROVINCIA DE ESMERALDAS: Bilsa reserve, Mache Chindul hills (79°45’W, 00°22’S). 7 January 2000. D. Dávalos. Universidad San Francisco de Quito and Fund. Herpetológica Orcés, Quito (FHGO-USFQ 2687-8, 2976); km 17 on Lita-Alto Tambo Road (78°31’W, 00°51’N, 830 m). 14 November 1990. J.-M. Touzet. (FHGO-USFQ 374); km 5 on Lita-Ibarra Road (78°25’W, 00°49’N, 550 m). 18 February 1991. J.-M. Touzet. (FHGO-USFQ 403); Sector Las Golondrinas (79°02’W, 00°20’N, 450 m). 29 November 1994. J.-M. Touzet. (FHGO-USFQ 1121); Zapallo Grande - Río Cayapas (78°57’W, 00°54’N, 90 m). 20 November 1989 – 13 July 1992. J. C. Vieira, J. Coroso, T. Leetz. (FHGO-USFQ 135, 344, 542). Verified by J.-M. Touzet. Trachyboa boulengeri occurs along the Chocoan lowlands of Panamá, Colombia and Ecuador. It has been recorded in Ecuador in the provinces of Los Ríos and Pichincha (Perez-Santos and Moreno 1991. Serpientes de Ecuador. Monogr. XI. Mus. Reg. Scien. Nat. Torino. 540 pp.). Specimens herein reported represent the westernmost locality of the species and the first record for the province of Esmeraldas, extending its range ca. 90 km NW from the nearest known locality in Pichincha and filling the gap between Colombian and Ecuadorian localities (Perez-Santos and Moreno, op. cit.).
Herpetological Review 35(4): 413; 2004
© 2004 by Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles
TRACHYBOA BOULENGERI (Northern Eyelash Boa). ECUA-
DOR: PROVINCIA DE ESMERALDAS: Bilsa reserve, Mache
Chindul hills (79°45W, 00°22S). 7 January 2000. D. Dávalos.
Universidad San Francisco de Quito and Fund. Herpetológica
Orcés, Quito (FHGO-USFQ 2687-8, 2976); km 17 on Lita-Alto
Tambo Road (78°31W, 00°51N, 830 m). 14 November 1990. J.-
M. Touzet. (FHGO-USFQ 374); km 5 on Lita-Ibarra Road
(78°25W, 00°49N, 550 m). 18 February 1991. J.-M. Touzet.
(FHGO-USFQ 403); Sector Las Golondrinas (79°02W, 00°20N,
450 m). 29 November 1994. J.-M. Touzet. (FHGO-USFQ 1121);
Zapallo Grande - Río Cayapas (78°57W, 00°54N, 90 m). 20 No-
vember 1989 – 13 July 1992. J. C. Vieira, J. Coroso, T. Leetz.
(FHGO-USFQ 135, 344, 542). Verified by J.-M. Touzet. Trachyboa
boulengeri occurs along the Chocoan lowlands of Panamá, Co-
lombia and Ecuador. It has been recorded in Ecuador in the prov-
inces of Los Ríos and Pichincha (Perez-Santos and Moreno 1991.
Serpientes de Ecuador. Monogr. XI. Mus. Reg. Scien. Nat. Torino.
540 pp.). Specimens herein reported represent the westernmost
locality of the species and the first record for the province of
Esmeraldas, extending its range ca. 90 km NW from the nearest
known locality in Pichincha and filling the gap between Colombian
and Ecuadorian localities (Perez-Santos and Moreno, op. cit.).
Submitted by DIEGO F. CISNEROS-HEREDIA, College of
Biological and Environmental Sciences, Universidad San Fran-
cisco de Quito, Ave. Interoceánica y calle Diego de Robles, Cam-
pus Cumbayá, Edif. Maxwell. Casilla Postal 17-12-841, Quito,
Ecuador; e-mail: diegofrancisco_cisneros@yahoo.com.
Herpetological Review 35(4), 2004
... En Ecuador se encuentra distribuida en los bosques siempreverdes de tierras bajas y bosques siempreverdes piemontanos al occidente de los Andes, en las provincias de Carchi, Esmeraldas, Imbabura, Los Ríos y Pichincha, en altitudes entre 90 y 900 m [20,38,64] ...
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We present an analysis of the diversity of snakes of Quito Metropolitan District, northern Ecuador. For this study, we conducted field work, examined material deposited at museums, and reviewed relevant literature. We found evidence of 41 species of snakes at Quito Metropolitan District, including members of the families Colubridae (31 spp.), Elapidae (3 spp.), Tropidophiidae (1 sp.), and Viperidae (6 spp.). The parishes of Nanegalito, Gualea, Pacto, and Nanegal, on montane and foothill forests, show the highest species richness among rural parishes. In 21 urban parishes, only six species of colubrid snakes were found, all non–venomous: Dipsas elegans, Erythrolamprus epinephelus, Lampropeltis sp. (cf. micropholis), Mastigodryas pulchriceps, Mastigodryas sp. (cf. boddaerti), and Sibon nebulata.
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