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Improving undergraduate soft skills using m-learning and serious games

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Abstract

Soft skills such as effective communication are becoming increasingly important for engineering graduates. Employers prize excellent written and oral abilities and literacy proficiency. High levels of academic literacy can significantly improve students' success in their university study. Traditional approaches to literacy improvement can limit student engagement. However, mobile learning and the use of smart phone apps present new opportunities to support literacy education. This paper describes current work exploring the use of apps, as serious games, to improve literacy in undergraduate students and outlines initial results from a cross-discipline evaluation of an m-learning literacy app.

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... As one of the popular technologies, the seriousness (educational) and entertaining nature of serious games make it an effective tool for education and teaching. Serious games have the characteristics of relaxation and entertaining [4], and at the same time impart knowledge and skills to players. In fact, serious games can produce better teaching effects than other methods [5], and they play a unique role in education. ...
Preprint
E-learning is a widely used learning method, but with the development of society, traditional E-learning method has exposed some shortcomings, such as the boring way of teaching, so that it is difficult to increase the enthusiasm of students and raise their attention in class. The application of serious games in E-learning can make up for these shortcomings and effectively improve the quality of teaching. When applying serious games to E-learning, there are two main considerations: educational goals and game design. A successful serious game should organically combine the two aspects and balance the educational and entertaining nature of serious games. This paper mainly discusses the role of serious games in E-learning, various elements of game design, the classification of the educational goals of serious games and the relationship between educational goals and game design. In addition, we try to classify serious games and match educational goals with game types to provide guidance and assistance in the design of serious games. This paper also summarizes some shortcomings that serious games may have in the application of E-learning.
... They used built in features on mobile phones (audio/video recording) to record and review the assigned tasks as roleplay in pair or trio or mock interview for oral interaction practice. Similarly m-learning apps provides exciting opportunities to engage learners to be skilled in communication skills (Smith et al., 2016). Wiemeyer & Zeaiter, (2015) proposed that social media could be a platform for synchronous and asynchronous oral communicative tasks in which learners could be exposed to real life discourses and acquainted with linguistic challenges. ...
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In this digital era, English is such a lingua franca which is important to fill up our daily offline and online communication activities in all spheres of our life. Thus, EFL learners (graduate level) need to be skilled in oral English communication in functioning professional operation effectively in future career. It is observed that a graduate with good oral English communication skills (OECS) has a better chance in career advancement and promotion rather than one who does not. Thus, the objective of this critical review is to This critical review on 28 research papers from 2010 to 2019 chosen from the database of Springer and Scopus using selecting criteria of PRISMA model (2009) and analyzing through NVIVO (12 version) aims to explore and identify causes for poor OECS, teaching techniques for OECS and assessment procedure of OECS. The prime findings of this study are shown that there are several causes e.g. anxiety, teaching techniques e.g. using technology or features of mobile phone and assessment procedures e.g. School based assessment for OECS. The analysis of this study is conducted for detailed description of the concepts and ideas for teachers and academic administrators for teaching and learning OECS effectively and functionally. However, this study would provide in-depth understanding and insights on causes and assessment of OECS for teachers who are teaching at University level, administrators who are involved to design courses and above all graduate level learners in EFL contexts and suggest to investigate a paradigm shift of traditional pedagogy into mobile based pedagogy in future.
... Además de estas actividades de carácter más tradicional, otras actividades más activas y motivadoras como los juegos serios [4], las estrategias de gamificación o el uso de las nuevas tecnologías como las redes sociales, la realidad virtual, aplicaciones móviles, etc. han comenzado a ser utilizadas para ayudar en el desarrollo de estas competencias [13]. ...
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