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Extant Brazilian mammals in scientific collections of Europe: an update. In: 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections, 2016, Berlin. Green Museum - How to practice what we preach? 2016 SPNHC Conference.

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Abstract

http://dx.doi.org/10.3372/spnhc2016
GREEN MUSEUM – HOW TO
PRACTICE WHAT WE PREACH?
2016 SPNHC conference
31st
Annual Meeting
June 20–25, 2016
Berlin, Germany
The 18 partner institutions offer access via 11 national Taxonomic Access Facilities (TAFs).
AT-TAF: Naturhistorisches Museum, Vienna
BE -TAF: Royal Belgian Institute of Natural
Sciences, Brussels; Royal Museum for
Central Africa, Tervuren
CZ-TAF: Národní Muzeum, Prague
DE -TAF: Botanischer Garten und Botanisches
Museum Berlin-Dahlem, Berlin;
Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin;
Senckenberg Gesellschaft für
Naturforschung, Frankfurt, Dresden,
Görlitz and Müncheberg; Staatliches
Museum für Naturkunde, Stuttgart
DK-TAF: University of Copenhagen
ES -TAF : Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales
& Real Jardín Botánico, Madrid
FR-TAF: Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle,
Paris
GB -TAF : Natural History Museum, London;
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew;
Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh
HU -TAF: Hungarian Natural History Museum,
Budapest
NL-TA F: Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden
SE -TA F: Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Stockholm
SYNTHESYS offers unique research opportunities to scientists from all over Europe.
Access is provided to:
European collections comprising more than half of the world’s natural history specimens
world class libraries
state-of-the-art facilities including imaging, chemical, and molecular laboratories
support from in-house scientists, including researchers, facilities staff, and collections managers
Participation is free of charge and is provided on the basis of scientific excellence of a proposal,
reviewed by a Selection Panel. Priority is given to new users. A typical project is 1-6 weeks in duration.
Contact SYNTHESYS for details of the online application process and deadlines:
Annual Calls for proposals in October (2013 - 2016)
Visits will be scheduled between January 2014 and August 2017
email: synthesys@nhm.ac.uk
www.synthesys.info
Access to research infrastructures
SYNTHESYS will provide finance for:
research costs
international travel and accommodation
per diem contribution towards living costs
logistical support at the host institution
SYNTHESYS is a project supporting an
integrated European infrastructure for natural
history collections funded via the EC Research
Infrastructure Activit y, FP7 Programme
GREEN MUSEUM – HOW TO
PRACTICE WHAT WE PREACH?
2016 SPNHC conference
31st
Annual Meeting
of the Society for the
Preservation of Natural
History Collections
June 20–25, 2016
Berlin, Germany
SPNHC 2016
Contents
Welcome 4
from your Berlin hosts 4
from the SPNHC 2016 LOC 6
from the President of SPNHC 8
Travel Grant Recipients and Mentors 10
Tradeshow and Sponsors 12
General Conference Information 14
General Information 14
Locations 20
Field Trips 24
Conference programme 26
Schedule at a Glance 26
Conference Programme at
andel's Hotel 32
List of Poster Presentations 52
Abstracts 56
Keynote Lectures 58
Symposia and Panel Discussions 60
Workshops 66
Oral and Poster Abstracts 70
Imprint 200
SPNHC 2016 – Welcome SPNHC 2016 – Welcome
4 5
The Museum für Naturkunde and the Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin welcome
you to the 31st annual meeting of the Society for the Preservation of Natural History
Collections and the 2nd Global Genome Biodiversity Network conference. We are proud to be
the first in Germany to host these events, where professionals from natural history collections
originating from 31 countries come together and share their knowledge, discuss ideas and
develop projects. Berlin, the largest city in Germany with its history both in politics and
science is an exciting choice for this event and we wish you a very pleasant stay during the
congress week.
Sharing a mutual history of scientific research and serving the community in the education
of the general public, the two institutions, the Museum and the Garden, pursuit similar
purposes but have different origins. Whereas the collections of the Museum für Naturkunde
were founded as a central part of the new Berlin University (Alma mater berolinensis, now
Humboldt University Berlin) in 1810, the Botanical Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin
predated the University by more than a century. It can be traced back to the kitchen garden
of the Berlin palace of 1679 via a model agricultural garden in a then suburban location (the
Kleistpark Schöneberg) to the present location in Dahlem. Due to the growth of the collections
and the scientific impact, both institutions had to relocate at the turn of the last century. The
zoological, anatomical, paleontological, and mineralogical collections of the Berlin University
(renamed Friedrich Wilhelm Universität in 1828) were united in 1889 and established the
Museum für Naturkunde at its present Invalidenstraße location. There, the collections have
grown tremendously, now encompassing more than 30 million specimens, the largest number
of specimens in one location for any German natural history institution. In 2009, the Museum
für Naturkunde left the Humboldt University and joined the Leibniz Association, a science
organization which – due to the national and international status and importance of its
institutions – is jointly funded by the Federation and the Länder. The Botanic Garden moved
in 1910 to its present location in order to accommodate the growing Herbarium, a Museum
and the living collection. Together with the foundation of institutes of the Kaiser-Wilhelm
Gesellschaft it created a science campus in Dahlem in the south-west of Berlin. With 20,000
different species of plants on 43 hectares the Berlin Botanic Garden and Museum houses
the largest botanical collections in Germany, today complemented by a DNA bank and a seed
bank. Its location in the American Sector of post World War II Berlin led to an affiliation with
the Freie Universität Berlin at its establishment in 1948. There, the Botanic Garden and
Botanical Museum Berlin now has the status of a Zentraleinrichtung.
Both institutions have closely worked together in many projects and initiatives and now
have joined forces to host this year's SPNHC and GGBN meetings. Each conference has an
exciting program with keynote lectures, symposia, demo camps and workshops along with
social activities where both conferences come together. We wish you a successful conference,
exciting field trips and interesting workshops – welcome to Berlin!
Professor Johannes Vogel, Ph.D. Professor Dr. Thomas Borsch
Director General Director
Museum für Naturkunde Botanic Garden and
Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Botanical Museum Berlin
Biodiversity Science Freie Universität Berlin
WELCOME
from your Berlin hosts
SPNHC 2016 – Welcome SPNHC 2016 – Welcome
6 7
It is our great pleasure to welcome you to Germany and the City of Berlin.
This is the first time that the Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections has
come to meet in Germany. The Museum für Naturkunde and the Botanic Garden and Botanical
Museum Berlin are proud to host the 31st annual meeting of the Society. Delegates from more
than 30 countries have made their trip to SPNHC 2016. To all of you a very warm welcome to
Berlin. – Herzlich Willkommen in Berlin!
This year’s theme “Green Museum – How to practice what we preach?” reflects in many ways
the challenges and changes natural history collections are facing at the moment.
In a world of climate change and ever decreasing biodiversity, sustainability should be the
criterion that determines all planning and decisions, ranging from field work to construction
projects, from ethical aspects to cost-benefit analyses. In practice this often is compromised
by constraints beyond the control of the institution, be it monetary, legal or other.
The rapidly growing digital world has long reached the natural history collections. Digitization
is the key word for opening up hidden treasures and information – for scientific questions as
well as societal challenges, and a fascinated public. Digitization changes the way of how we
look at collections and how we work with them. It leads to new users and uses and novel types
of collections along with new requirements. Digital mobilization of collections from processes
to databases and standards for their integration in research and education has become a whole
world in its own. This is also reflected by the SPNHC 2016 conference.
The same is true for new analytical methods and research fields such as molecular
systematics. DNA and tissue collections (so called ‘cold archives’) are standard in research
institution holding collections. The work of the Global Genome Biodiversity Network (GGBN)
focuses on standards and best practice of these collections and the exchange and use of
material according to international regulations. It was more than logic to bring together both
societies for their meetings to stimulate exchange and common understanding.
A conference of this size would not be possible without the support from many sides. It all
starts at the hosting institutions. Without an enthusiastic home base from director to student it
simply would not be possible to organize a SPNHC conference.
A big THANKYOU from all of us goes to our sponsors and vendors for their significant financial
support. Please use the opportunities during the breaks and vendors lunch on Thursday to visit
them at the Rubin conference hall.
Right from the beginning, all the way down from our first thoughts about SPNHC in Berlin
to the actual event, it has always been your enthusiasm as SPNHC members, conference
attendees, and colleagues with common understanding that has carried us and driven us
forward. In these times of immense changes in our world of natural history collections it is
even more important to come together, share knowledge, learn from each other and join forces
regardless from which country in the world you come. We think, SPNHC is an excellent place
for this, and we hope that SPNHC 2016 will contribute to this spirit.
In this sense we wish all of us a fruitful meeting and a lot of fun!
Enjoy SPNHC 2016 and don’t forget to take some time for your very own Berlin experience.
Christiane Quaisser
Chair, SPNHC 2016 Local Organizing Committee
SPNHC 2016 Local Organizing
Committee
Team MfN
Peter Giere
Christiane Quaisser
Daniela Schwarz
Manja Voss
Team BGBM
Eva Häffner
Lena Kempener
Cornelia Löhne
Patricia Rahemipour
Team Agentur Konsens
Karlheinz Blackert
Susanne Kessler
Kirsten Merdanovic
Constanze Sürken
We would like thank all who
have contributed to the
success of the SPNHC 2016
conference!
HERZLICH WILLKOMMEN!
Welcome from the SPNHC 2016
Local Organizing Committee
SPNHC 2016 – Welcome SPNHC 2016 – Welcome
8 9
On behalf of SPNHC Council, it gives me great pleasure to welcome all participants to Berlin,
Germany for our 31st Annual Meeting. Once again we spread our wings internationally by
visiting the European continent and hope that this provides an interactive and collaborative
environment for all of our members. Our annual meetings provides us the opportunity to
network with colleagues, learn more about advancing techniques in collection management,
highlight and celebrate our accomplishments and socialize in a unique setting.
Once again, the Local Organizing Committee from Berlin has done a tremendous
job of providing a full and engaging program of events including exciting and engaging oral and
poster sessions, informative workshops and some fun social
events. We thank them for the huge amount of work they have put in to make this event a
success. The conference theme “Green Museums – How to Practice what we Preach?” is very
timely as we all feel the effects of climate change and environmental degradation and attempt
to find ways to combat its effects not only on the specimens we collect and preserve, but also
in our day to day practices as museum professionals. This is an interesting time for collections
with both challenges and opportunities presenting themselves at every turn. Budgetary
restrictions are necessitating new and innovative mechanisms of caring for our collections
while the world-wide digitization initiative and ongoing community collaboration is providing
new and exciting opportunities for collections use by an ever growing external user community.
Collections advocacy and exposure in public and social media is also highlighting collections
role in predictive modeling, climate change and many of the core environmental problems of
our day.
Meetings such as these would not be possible without the valued financial support of our
vendors and sponsors. We thank them for their continued support and encourage you to do the
same by visiting their booths at the vendor show to see their new products and technologies.
The society as a hole functions through the valuable work of its committees and I would
encourage all of you to become involved in the work of the society by volunteering your time
with one of our many committees. If there is a committee
you are interested in please attend their meeting on Tuesday morning and offer up your help
with their important work. If you are a member of another like-minded society, consider
becoming a representative from and to that society and SPNHC
so that we can continue our work of building a powerful collections community.
If you are new to the Society we welcome you to your first meeting and hope that you will
take advantage of all our meetings have to offer. Engage with established and new members
through our Emerging Professionals Committee to find out ways in which you can become
involved and get the most out of the meeting or find a Council member who will be happy to
assist you navigate the meeting.
Our Travel Grant assistance has once again assisted in funding the attendance of five members
who will be mentored by established collections professionals who will assist before, during
and after the meeting. We thank our mentors for their help.
If you need any assistance during the meeting please find one of the members of the Local
Organizing Committee or a Council member who are all identified on their name tags.
All that remains is for me to wish you a productive, engaging, fun-filled meeting.
Andrew Bentley
President
Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections (SPNHC)
WELCOME
TO SPNHC 2016!!
SPNHC 2016 – Travel Grant recipients SPNHC 2016 – Travel Grant recipients
10 11
SPNHC 2016 Travel Grant Recipients and Mentors
Christine Allen Travel Grant Recipient
Mariana Di Giacomo
University of Delaware, Department of Art Conservation, Newark, DE, 19716, United States
Conference Mentor: Matt Brown
Fitzgerald Travel Grant Recipients
Julian Carter
National Museum Wales, Dept of Collection Services, Cardiff, CF10 3NP, UK
Conference Mentor: Miranda Lowe
Erica Krimmel
Chicago Academy of Sciences / Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, Biology, Chicago, 60614,
United States
Conference Mentor: Elana Benamy
Suzie Li Wan Po
Cambridge University Museum of Zoology, Conservation, Cambridge, CB2 3EJ, UK
Conference Mentor: Cathy Hawks
Brian Rankin
University of California, Museum of Paleontology, Berkeley, California, 94720, United States
Conference Mentor: Ann Molineux
SPNHC and the 2016 Local Organizing Committee would like to congratulate all recipients
and welcome them to this year's conference. We would also like to thank the reviewing team
and the mentors of this year's travel grant recipients for their efforts.
SPNHC 2016
Travel Grant Recipients and Mentors
SPNHC 2016 – Sponsors
12 13
THE NEXT GENERATION IN BEST PRACTICES
JUNE 18 – 24, 2017
HOSTED BY
The local organizing commiee, a partnership between the Denver Museum
of Nature & Science and the Denver Botanic Gardens, is honored to host the
32nd annual meeng of the Society for the Preservaon of Natural History
Collecons. Kelly Tomajko, SPNHC Member-at-Large, will chair the commiee,
and it will include Society members who are already acve parcipants in the
Society’s annual meengs and acvies.
The theme of the meeng is “The Next Generaon in Best Pracces.” This broad
theme is intended to reect the core aim of SPNHC to codify and disseminate
best pracces for the development, management, and care of natural history
collecons. Stay tuned for meeng informaon at www.spnhc2017denver.org.
Conveniently located, Denver is the gateway to both the Rocky Mountains and
the eastern plains. It has a great deal to oer those who wish to explore its
vibrant cultural community as well as those who are interested in more remote
areas of Colorado. To learn more about travel in Denver and across Colorado,
please see Visit Denver at www.denver.org.
We thank all conference sponsors and vendors who
contribute towards the 31st Annual Meeting of
the Society for the Preservation of Natural History
Collections.
DIAMOND
› Delta Designs Ltd.
› Synthesys c/o Natural History Museum
PLATINUM
› Axiell ALM Germany GmBH
GOLD
› iDigBio
› JSTOR
› Picturae B.V.
SILVER
› Anton Paar GmbH
› Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF)
› Testo AG
BRONZE
› Alcomon Company
› Biologische Beratung Ltd.
› CollectionSpace
› Digitarium, University of Eastern Finland
› Panko Set Bartlomiej Pankowski
SUPPORTING PARNERS
› Springer Verlag
› University Products, Inc.
LITERATURE TABLE
› Bruynzeel Archiv & Bürosysteme GmbH
› Rowman & Littlefield
FLYER/INFORMATION MATERIAL ONSITE
› Kodex, Inc. X-Ray Associates East LLC
EP LUNCHEON
› All Packaging Company, Inc.
› Hollinger Metal Edge, Inc.
› iDigBio
PROMOTIONAL ITEMS
› Schweizerbart / Borntraeger Science Publisher
SPNHC 2016
TRADESHOW AND
SPONSORS
SPNHC 2016 – General Information SPNHC 2016 – General Information
14 15
SPNHC AND GGBN – TWO CONFERENCES, ONE LOCATION?
The Local Organizing Committees of these two conferences have linked these conferences so
that people who wish to attend both conferences can easily switch between venues. However,
due to different requirements of each conference, they were not combined. Yet, wherever
possible and useful, a combined audience is planned, e.g. in social activities, workshops,
and the opening sessions. Please be reminded, that the lanyards of your name tag identifies
you as a SPNHC attendee. As such, you are entitled to participate in sessions of the GGBN
conference (venue: Onyx, basement level).
VENUE
The 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections
including all symposia, trade show, poster presentations and breaks will take place in andel's
Hotel, Landsberger Allee 106, 10369 Berlin (52.5283926 | 13.457035799999971).
Catering during coffee breaks and lunch are included in the registration fee.
REGISTRATION BOOTH
Please visit the registration booth prior to attending a session to check in and pick up your
badge and conference bag. Badges should be worn at any time while attending the conference.
Presenting their badge, conference participants will have free admission to the Museum
für Naturkunde and the Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum Berlin throughout
the conference. The registration booth will be located in andel's Hotel in the lobby of the
conference area. The opening hours of the registration booth are:
Tuesday, June 21: 8:00 AM - 6:30 PM
Wednesday, June 22: 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday, June 23: 7:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Friday, June 24: 7:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Please do not hesitate to consult the people at the registration booth with any question you
have on the conference, on social events and in general with any problem you might encounter.
CONFERENCE COMMITTEE
For all inquiries, the conference committee can be reached via:
SPNHC 2016 hotline: +49 157 54188533
Email: spnhc2016@mfn-berlin.de
Other important numbers
andel's Hotel: +49 30 4530530
Museum für Naturkunde: +49 30 2093 8591
Botanical Garden and
Botanical Museum Berlin: +49 30 838 50100
Ambulance/fire brigade: 112
Police 110
WIFI
Wireless internet access will be available throughout the conference venue. Access information
will be provided in the conference bag.
SPNHC 2016
GENERAL CONFERENCE INFORMATION
SPNHC 2016 – General Information SPNHC 2016 – General Information
16 17
WORKSHOPS
The workshops are mainly scheduled for Saturday, June 25 (see list of workshops in this
volume) either at the Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum Berlin or at the Museum
für Naturkunde. However, there is one two-day workshop scheduled for June 25-26 in
Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum Berlin (Museum environments: managing risk
and sustainability). Some SPNHC 2016 attendees also signed up for workshops offered by
GGBN (Documentation of environmental samples and eDNA and GGI Gardens) on Monday,
June 20, at the Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum Berlin or on Tuesday, June 21,
at the Museum für Naturkunde (Advances in cryopreservation methods for microorganisms
and plants). For these workshops, please contact the GGBN hosts for more information. The
meeting point for the workshops at the Museum für Naturkunde will be the staff entrance
(see map in this volume). The meeting point for the workshops in the Botanischer Garten und
Botanisches Museum Berlin will be at the entrance to the Botanical Museum (see map in this
volume).
FIELD TRIPS
The field trips start at June 19 or June 20, respectively, at andel's Hotel (meeting point: lobby
of the hotel) and aim to be back in time for the Icebreaker at the Museum für Naturkunde.
Participants will be provided with more information individually via e-mail.
SOCIAL EVENTS
The Icebreaker will take place in the Museum für Naturkunde in Invalidenstraße 43, 10115
Berlin (52.52994 | 13.379553) on Monday, June 20. It starts with a get-together and guided
tours at 5:00 PM, followed by an official welcome at 7:00 PM. The meeting point will be at the
Museum für Naturkunde, main entrance. For your convenience, fieldtrips will end in front of
the museum. For getting from the andel's Hotel to the museum, please take Tram M5 or Tram
M8 (direction Hauptbahnhof) which start directly at the andel's hotel. For more information see
entries Venues (above) and Getting around (below).
The Icebreaker will include a meet-and-greet of first time attendees, travel grant recipients and
their mentors, the SPNHC Council and Local Organizing Committee. More information will be
provided individually.
The Congress Banquet will be at the glass houses of the Botanischer Garten und Botanisches
Museum Berlin, Königin Luise Straße 6-8, 14195 Berlin (52.458657 | 13.304611) on
Thursday, June 23. Botanischer Garten und Botanisches MuseumThere will be a bus transfer
to the Botanic Garden and back. The busses will leave at the andel's Hotel bus stop (east side
of the hotel at Storkower Straße) between 5:30 PM and 6:00 PM. Buses for the andel's Hotel
will leave the Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum Berlin between 10:00 PM and
midnight.
The sightseeing by bike will leave on Wednesday, June 22, at 6:30 PM. Be aware that
the meeting point will be at the Nikolaiviertel. Further information will be provided by the
registration counter.
We plan for a pub quiz on Tuesday night (June 21, tbc).
INFORMATION FOR PRESENTERS
Papers/Talks
Talks are scheduled in 20 minutes time slots including any time for questions. This will be
rigorously enforced to accommodate concurrent session needs, courtesy for presenters and
attendees who may need to move between meeting rooms. Presenters should plan to use their
time slot with 15 min of presenting and 5 minutes for audience questions Presentation slides
should be prepared and saved as either PowerPoint or PDF.
Authors have been informed about session and time slot of their presentation. If there are any
doubts please contact the Local Organizing Committee beforehand.
Computer on place are exclusively Windows based systems. Your presentation should be
submitted prior to your scheduled session (this is: either on the day before, during coffee
breaks prior to the session) for upload to these computers, and there will be staff available to
assist you. Alternatively, you can bring your own computer, for example if you prefer using a
MacIntosh computer, but please do not forget the adapter.
Posters
Poster should be maximum A0 upright format and cannot exceed these dimensions. The
format corresponds to a maximum of 84.1 cm (33’1’’) horizontal width and 118.9 cm (46’8’’)
vertical height. Presenters will be provided with boards and thumbtacks, so all you have to do
is to bring your poster.
Poster will be presented at the Rubin. Set up starts on Tuesday morning, breakdown on Friday
afternoon. Poster session is scheduled on Wednesday, June 22, during the afternoon break
(3:10-4:00 PM). We would like to ask all poster presenters to be present during this session.
VENDOR'S INFORMATION
Vendors are advised to set-up on Monday, June 20. The breakdown of the tradeshow will be on
Friday, June 24 in theafternoon. Each vendor will be informed individually on further details.
VENDOR'S LUNCH
The vendors will be given the opportunity for a very brief presentation of their products prior
to the Vendor's Lunch. These presentations are scheduled for Thursday, June 23 at noon in
Onyx, the following Vendor's Lunch will be in neighbouring Rubin. Please do not miss this
opportunity to get in touch with our sponsors.
SOCIAL MEDIA
The Local Organizing Committee decided not to take part in social media activities.
GUIDED TOURS BEHIND THE SCENES OF THE HOSTING INSTITUTIONS
Guided tours will be available during the Icebreaker on Monday, June 20 for the collections
and exhibitions of the Museum für Naturkunde and prior the conference dinner for the
Botanisches Museum und BotanischerGarten Berlin. For transport see social events.
Tours for either institution will also be offered on Friday, June 24, after the SPNHC Annual
Business Meeting. Please enquire at the information counter or at the registration booth for
more information.
SPNHC ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING
The 2016 Annual Business Meeting of the Society for the Preservation of Natural History
Collections will take place on June 24, 2016 between noon and 2 PM at andel's Hotel. The
Venue is Saphir 1. A light lunch will be provided in the room for your convenience.
SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS
Special Interest Groups will meet from 2:00 – 4:00 PM on Friday, June 24 at andel's Hotel
in various venues. Please check the information provided at the registration booth for more
information.
SPNHC 2016 – General Information SPNHC 2016 – General Information
18 19
GETTING AROUND
Berlin public transport (BVG and S-Bahn Berlin) is a good way to get around in Berlin. There
are a few things you should know when using this system:
1. One ticket for all modes of transport: S-Bahn, U-Bahn, Tram, Bus
(and even some ferries…)
2. Buy your ticket in advance, e.g. at the information desk at the andel’s Hotel, on the
platform (S-Bahn or U-Bahn, vending machines) or in the Bus/Tram (driver/ vending
machines, no bills). Be sure to validate tickets bought in advance by inserting it into the
slot of the ticket cancelling machine on the platform (S-Bahn or U-Bahn) or within the
vehicle (Bus/Tram).
3. AB-Ticket (one way, all necessary transfers, valid up to two hours, all public transport
within Berlin), Schönefeld Airport to andel's Hotel: ABC Ticket
For more information and specific requests, the information desk at the andel’s Hotel is happy
to assist you – or see http://www.bvg.de/en / download the BVG app, which can also be used for
purchasing tickets.
PUBLIC TRANSPORT BETWEEN VENUES
andel's Hotel Museum für Naturkunde:
Take Tram M5 or M8 (direction S+U Hauptbahnhof) and exit at U Naturkundemuseum.
Ticket: AB, duration: ca. 30 minutes
Museum für Naturkunde andel's Hotel:
Take Tram M5 (direction Hohenschönhausen, Zingster Str.) or Tram M8
(direction Ahrensfelde/Stadtgrenze) and exit at S Landsberger Allee.
Ticket: AB, duration: ca. 30 minutes.
andel's Hotel Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum:
Take S41 (circular line, clockwise direction) to S Schöneberg,
transfer to S1 (direction S Wannsee) to S+U Rathaus Steglitz,
transfer to Bus X83 (direction Königin Luise Str. / Clayallee),
exit at Königin Luise Platz / Botanischer Garten.
Ticket: AB, duration: ca. 45 minutes
Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum andel's Hotel:
take Bus X83 (direction Lichtenrade, Nahariyastr.) to S+U Rathaus Steglitz,
transfer to S1 (direction S Oranienburg) to S Schöneberg,
transfer to S42 (circular line, counterclockwise direction),
exit at S Landsberger Allee.
Ticket: AB, duration ca. 45 minutes
PARKING
The andel's Hotel offers guest parking at an additional cost. Free parking may be found in the
vicinity – the area surrounding the hotel is not a controlled parking zone.
ELECTRICITY SUPPLY
Electricity supply is 230 V – 50 HZ AC. Do not forget to bring an adapter for plug type F
(“Schuko”) or C (EURO).
DISCLAIMER
Neither of the legal entities involved in the organization and hosting of the conference can be
held liable for any damage to persons or damage or loss of property during the conference in
any of the conference venues and during associated activities elsewhere.
SPNHC 2016 – General Information SPNHC 2016 – General Information
20 21
SAPHIR 1
SAPHIR 2
AMETHYST
BERNSTEIN
CONVENTION
FOYER
HOTEL
LOBBY
FOYER
GROUND FLR
Metrotram stop Landsberger Allee
M5 / M8 westwards > Museum für Naturkunde
S-Bahn station
Landsberger Allee
Circular lines (Ringbahn):
S42 northwards > U6 > Museum für Naturkunde
S41 southwards > S1 / U9 / U3 > Bus X83 > Botanical Museum
N
RUBIN
FOYER
BASEMENT
ONYX
(GGBN )
andel's Hotel Berlin
by Vienna House
Landsberger Allee 106
10369 Berlin
SPNHC 2016
LOCATIONS
SPNHC 2016 – General Information SPNHC 2016 – General Information
22 23
Schloßstr.
Bus X83
Altensteinstr.
Birkbuschstr.
Albrechtstr.
Grunewaldstr.
Lepsiusstr. Lepsiusstr.
Schildhornstr.
Luise-Str.
Englerallee
Walther-Schreiber-
Platz
Schloßstr.
Rathaus
Steglitz
Breitenbachplatz
Podbielskiallee
Dahlem-Dorf
Botanischer Garten
Bus M48
Bus 101
Willdenowstr.
Unter den Eichen
Ficht
Am
enberg
Botanisches
Museum
Botanischer
Garten
Königin-
BGBM site plan,
directions
Museum entrance: Königin-Luise-Straße 6–8
S-Bahn station Landsberger Allee > circular line S41 >
S-Bahn station Schöneberg > city line S1 >
S-Bahn station Rathaus Steglitz > Bus X83 “Königin-Luise-Str.” >
Königin-Luise-Platz/Botanischer Garten
S-Bahn station Landsberger Allee > circular line S41 >
S- and U-Bahn station Bundesplatz > subway line U9 >
U-Bahn station Rathaus Steglitz > Bus X83 “Königin-Luise-Str.” >
Königin-Luise-Platz/Botanischer Garten
S-Bahn station Landsberger Allee > circular line S41 >
S- and U-Bahn station Heidelberger Platz > subway line U3 >
U-Bahn station Dahlem Dorf > Bus X83 “Lichtenrade” >
Königin-Luise-Platz/Botanischer Garten
GBIF.org/spnhc
Discover millions of records on specimens,
species names and observations
Find tools and guidance on mobilizing and
publishing open-access biodiversity data
from natural history collections
Ensure long-term persistence, visibility,
use and reuse of species information from
collections and institutions
© Museum für Naturkunde Berlin
Bundesministerium
für Verkehr, Bau und
Stadtentwicklung,
Invalidenstr. 44
Landwirtschaftlich-
Gärtnerische
Fakultät der
Humboldt-Universität
zu Berlin,
Invalidenstr. 42
to Hauptbahnhof (central station)
to TXL Airport ExpressBus
by metrotram
Metrotramstop (M5, M8, M10)
and subway station (U6)
Naturkundemuseum
Invalidenstraße
North
building
East
wing
main entrance
MfN site plan
1 Main museum entrance
2 Barrier
Registration / delivery
3 Portal III:
Entrance for disabled persons
Wheelchair-accessible elevator
4 Freight elevator
Wheelchair-accessible elevator
5 Portal V:
Staff entrance
5a Seminar room Z 7003 (ground flr)
5b Seminar room Zoology N 5411 (2nd half flr)
5c Seminar room Palaeontol. S 4301 (2nd flr)
5d Preparatory (top floor)
6 Adlerportal (Eagle portal)
6a Seminar room N 3221 (2nd flr)
6b Lecture haal 8 (2nd flr)
6c Seminar room N 3330 (3rd floor)
7 Freight elevator North building
Construction site
M Hotel Mercure
Spree
Spree
Spree
Spree
Schwarzer
W
eg
T
orstraße
Torstraße
T
Oranienburger
Straße
Reinhardtstraße
Luisenstraße
Hessische
St
r
.
r
.
r
H
a
n
n
o
v
e
r
s
c
h
e
S
t
r
a
ß
e
Friedrichstraße
Friedrichstraße
Chausseestraße
Chausseestraße
Invalidenstraße
Invalidenstraße
Invalidenstraße
Invalidenstraße
Museum
Hamburger
Bahnhof
Berliner
Medizin-
historisches
Museum
der
Charité
Invaliden-
park
Mensa
Nord
NordbahnhofNordbahnhof
Oranienburger
Straße
Friedrichstraße
Friedrichstraße
Oranienburger
Oranienburger
Oranienburger
T
or
TorT
Oranienburger
Oranienburger
Straße
Friedrichstraße
Friedrichstraße
Hauptbahnhof
Hauptbahnhof
Hauptbahnhof
Naturkundemuseum
Naturkundemuseum
Naturkundemuseum
1
1
0
0
m
Surrounding area,
connections
Junction of long distance trains,
regional express trains, regional trains,
U-Bahn to Reichstag, and S-Bahn:
Hauptbahnhof
S-Landsberger Allee > S8 / S9 / circular line S41 >
S-Ostkreuz > city lines S5 / S7 / S75 >
S-Friedrichstraße, S-Hauptbahnhof
S-Landsberger Allee > circular line S42 >
S-Gesundbrunnen > city lines S1 / S2 / S25 >
S-Nordbahnhof, S-Oranienburger Straße
S-Landsberger Allee > circular line S42 >
S+U-Wedding > subway line U6 >
U-Naturkundemuseum, U-Friedrichstraße
Landsberger Allee > metrotram M5 via S-Alexanderplatz /
metrotram M8 via S-Nordbahnhof >
Metrotramstop Naturkundemuseum
SPNHC 2016 – General Information SPNHC 2016 – General Information
24 25
With about 37 million objects, the Senckenberg network constitutes the biggest natural
history collection in Germany. The network partners are distributed over whole Germany
with comprehensive collections in the natural history museums in Dresden, Görlitz and
Frankfurt and the German Entomological Institute in Müncheberg and additional research
institutions focusing e.g. on climate change and marine science. A well-known member of the
Senckenberg community is the Messel Pit (Grube Messel). It was a bituminous shale mine
and became almost a landfill but strong local resistance fortunately stopped these plans at
the end. In 1995 it was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site because of the abundance
of extraordinary (Eocene) fossils, e.g. Darwinius masillae. Until today, significant scientific
discoveries are still being made.
The two-day field trip offers a unique chance to get a deep insight in both, the Senckenberg
headquarter in Frankfurt with its wonderful exhibitions and valuable collections and the
famous Messel Pit. Starting on Sunday morning at the andel’s hotel we will go by train to
Frankfurt where the colleagues from the Senckenberg Naturmuseum will take us on a tour
through the exhibition and collections (with focus on paleontological collections). At the end
of this first exciting day, a bus will bring us to our hotel, the Jagdschloss Kranichstein. It is
situated just a few minutes from the Messel Pit in Darmstadt. Monday morning will be spent
on an excursion at the Messel Pit World Heritage Site. We will have the chance to experience
live excavation and preparation activities and will have look at the visitors’ center. After lunch
a bus shuttle will bring us to the train station to get back to Berlin. To make sure that you
can fully relax and enjoy the whole field trip from start to end, we will take of everything and
arranged an all-inclusive-package.
The fieldtrip will guide you through the historic town of Stralsund, the impressive
Meeresmuseum and Ozeaneum and will make a trip to the beautiful coast of the Baltic
Sea. We will start by bus in Berlin and go directly to Prerow, on the Fischland-Darß-Zingst
peninsula. After a light walk through the unique forest environment that is part of the national
reservation Vorpommersche Boddenlandschaft, we will visit the lighthouse and Museum
Natureum on the northern top of the peninsula. A “Kremser” (covered char-a-bank) trip
will take us back to the bus from where we go to Stralsund, one of the old hanseatic cities
along the Baltic Sea. On the next day, we will visit the Ozeaneum/maritime museum. With
its different buildings the maritime museum is embedded in the beautiful historic city of
Stralsund. Most famous is the Ozeaneum with its giant sea water tanks that will take you
on an exceptional journey through the underwater world of the northern seas that is unique
throughout Europe.
About 100 km south-east of Berlin is the UNESCO biosphere reserve Spreewald. It is known
for its traditional irrigation system, which consists of more than 200 small canals, and is
traditionally and best travelled by punts. The landscape was shaped during the Ice Age. Alder
forests on wetlands and pine forests on sandy dry areas are characteristic for the region.
This field trip will take you on a punt tour and walk to discover a unique combination of
untouched nature and cultural traditions. Starting directly from the andel’s hotel, we will go
first to Lübbenau by bus, from where we enter the punts. At lunchtime, we will stop at the
restaurant "Wofschofska" and continue afterwards our punt tour to the outdoor museum in
Lehde. After returning to Lübbenau, we will go back to Berlin by bus again.
This field trip will lead us to the grasslands and marshes of the “Havelländisches Luch”
and Havel River valley some 70 kilometres west of Berlin. The marshes have been drained
and degraded for agricultural purpose in the 1970s but are now in a state of restoration.
The “Havelländisches Luch” is the main site for the Great Bustard Otis tarda in Germany.
Moreover it is home of many other threatened grassland species such as Corncrake, Quail,
Montague’s Harrier etc. We will also visit the nearby Bird Conservation Centre belonging to the
Brandenburg State office of Environment. In the afternoon, we will visit Gülper See, a shallow
lake with adjacent meadows and streams which is a hotspot for marsh birds, waterfowl and
raptors such as the White-tailed Eagle. Binoculars are mandatory. The field trip is restricted to
15 participants and includes lunch boxes. We will travel with small buses.
FIELD TRIP
Senckenberg,
Forschungsinstitut und
Naturmuseum Frankfurt/Main
and Messel Research Station
Time: two days, June 19-20,
2016
Departure: June 19, 7:15 AM;
arrival: June 20, 7:30 PM
Bus pick up location: lobby of
the andel’s hotel
FIELD TRIP
Darß, Stralsund and Deutsches
Meeresmuseum Stralsund
Time: two days, June 19-20,
2016
Departure: June 19, 7:30 AM;
arrival: June 20, 7:00 PM
Bus pick up location: lobby of
the andel’s hotel
FIELD TRIP
Spreewald punt tour
Time: one day, June 19, 2016
Departure: 7:15 AM; arrival:
6:45 PM
Bus pick up location: lobby of
the andel’s hotel
FIELD TRIP
Steppe birds and grassland
restoration in the Rhin-Havel
River drainage basin
Time: one day, June 19, 2016
Departure: 6:00 AM; arrival:
6:00 PM
Bus pick up location: lobby of
the andel’s hotel
SPNHC 2016
FIELD TRIPS
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
26 27
Day Time Programme Venue
Sunday,
June 19
Field trips
Departure 7:15 AM Senckenberg, Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseum
Frankfurt/Main and Messel Research Station
Departure 7:30 AM Stralsund and the Deutsches Meeresmuseum Stralsund
Monday,
June 20
Field trips
Arrival 7:30 PM Senckenberg, Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseum
Frankfurt/Main and Messel Research Station
Arrival 7:00 PM Stralsund and the Deutsches Meeresmuseum Stralsund
7:15 AM - 6:45 PM Spreewald punt tour
6:00 AM - 6:00 PM Steppe birds and grassland restoration in the Rhin-Havel
River drainage basin
Guided tours and Icebreaker Museum für Naturkunde
5:00 - 7:00 PM Come together and guided tours behind the scene
collections and exhibit tours
7:00 - 9:00 PM Welcome and Icebreaker reception
Tuesday,
June 21
andel's Hotel Landsberger Allee
8:00 AM - 6:30 PM Registration Registration Desk, Lobby
8:30 AM - 6:30 PM Trade show Rubin
8:30 AM - 6:30 PM Poster set up Rubin
9:00 - 10:00 AM SPNHC Committee meetings Amethyst 1, Amethyst 2, Bernstein 1,
Bernstein 2
10:00 - 10:30 AM Break Rubin
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM SPNHC Committee meetings Amethyst 1, Amethyst 2, Bernstein 1,
Bernstein 2
12:30 - 13:30 PM Lunch Rubin
AT A GLANCE
SCHEDULE
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
28 29
Day Time Programme Venue
Thursday,
June 23
andel's Hotel Landsberger Allee
7:30 AM - 5:30 PM Registration Registration Desk, Lobby
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM Trade show Rubin
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM Poster display Rubin
8:30 - 9:50 AM Technical Sessions (concurrent)
SYNTHESYS Symposium: Enabling Infrastructure: Future
Collections, Data & Informatics
Saphir 1
Digitizing and Imaging Collections: New Methods, Ideas,
and Uses
Saphir 2
Green Museum Session Amethyst
9:50 - 10:20 AM Break Rubin
10:20 AM - 12:00 PM Technical Sessions (concurrent)
SYNTHESYS Symposium: Enabling Infrastructure: Future
Collections, Data & Informatics
Saphir 1
Digitizing and Imaging Collections: New Methods, Ideas,
and Uses
Saphir 2
iDigBio Symposium 1: Small Collections Symposium:
Blending the educational resources of small and large
collections for training the next generation of museum
professionals.
Amethyst
Preventive Conservation & Material Science Bernstein
12:00 - 1:10 PM Vendors' Lunch Rubin
1:10 - 2:50 PM Technical Sessions (concurrent)
SYNTHESYS Symposium: Enabling Infrastructure: Future
Collections, Data & Informatics
Saphir 1
Digitizing and Imaging Collections: New Methods, Ideas,
and Uses
Saphir 2
iDigBio Symposium 1: Small Collections Symposium:
Blending the educational resources of small and large
collections for training the next generation of museum
professionals.
Amethyst
Preventive Conservation & Material Science Bernstein
2:50 - 3:20 PM Break Rubin
Day Time Programme Venue
2:00 - 3:00 PM Official Opening Saphir
3:00 - 4:00 PM Keynote Speaker SPNHC Saphir
4:00 - 4:30 PM Break Rubin
4:30 - 5:30 PM Keynote Speaker GGBN Saphir
5:30 - 7:30 PM SPNHC Council Meeting Bernstein
7:30 PM - open end Optional Social Event tba
Wednes-
day,
June 22
andel's Hotel Landsberger Allee
8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Registration Registration Desk, Lobby
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM Trade show Rubin
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM Poster display Rubin
9:00 - 10:00 AM Keynote Green Museum Saphir 1
10:00 - 10:30 AM Break Rubin
10:30 AM - 12:10 PM Green Museum Session Saphir 1
12:10 - 1:20 PM Lunch Rubin
12:10 - 1:20 PM Emerging Professionals Luncheon Bernstein
1:20 - 3:10 PM Technical Sessions (concurrent)
iDigBio Symposium: An International Conversation on
Mobilizing Natural History Collections (NHC) Data and
Integrating Data for Research
Saphir 1
Green Museum Session Amethyst
3:10 - 4:00 PM Break & Poster Session Rubin
4:00 - 5:20 PM Technical Sessions (concurrent)
iDigBio Symposium: An International Conversation on
Mobilizing Natural History Collections (NHC) Data and
Integrating Data for Research
Saphir 1
Green Museum Session Amethyst
6:30 - 9:30 PM Optional Social Event: Sightseeing by bike Nikolaiviertel
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
30 31
Day Time Programme Venue
Collections stewardship and policies Amethyst
12:00 - 2:00 PM SPNHC Annual Business Meeting Luncheon (open to all) Saphir 1
2:00 - 4:00 PM Optional: Special Interest Groups, collection tours, etc. tba
4:00 PM Closure of the Conference
Saturday,
June 25
Workshops
(Coffee and lunch breaks included in registration)
Full day 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Museum environments: Managing risk and sustainability
(Moderators: Rob Waller, Jeremy Linden)
Botanischer Garten und Botanisches
Museum
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Synthesys-iDigBio: Digitisation Software Training
Workshop: Inselect, Symbiota & ABBYY FineReader
(Moderators: Elspeth Haston, Deborah Paul)
Botanischer Garten und Botanisches
Museum
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Cost-efficient large-scale surface digitizing via
photogrammetry – approaches for small and large
collections (Moderator: Heinrich Mallison)
Museum für Naturkunde
Half day 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Fluid collections – conservation techniques (Moderators:
Dirk Neumann, Julian Carter)
Museum für Naturkunde
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Cleaning – repairing – restoring of historical mounted bird
specimens (Moderator: Jürgen Fiebig)
Museum für Naturkunde
1:30 - 4:30 PM "Access and Benefit Sharing" in Natural History Collections
– implementation and practical management (Moderators:
Dirk Neumann, Peter Giere)
Museum für Naturkunde
1:30 - 4:30 PM Proper sealing in fluid collections (Moderators: Klaus
Wechsler, Christoph Meier)
Museum für Naturkunde
Sunday,
June 26
Workshops
(Coffee and lunch breaks included in registration)
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Museum environments: Managing risk and sustainability
(Moderators: Rob Waller, Jeremy Linden)
Botanischer Garten und Botanisches
Museum
Day Time Programme Venue
3:20 - 5:00 PM Technical Sessions (concurrent)
GBIF TF Symposium: Setting global and local digitization
priorities
Saphir 1
Digitizing and Imaging Collections: New Methods, Ideas,
and Uses
Saphir 2
Collections for the future - Future of collections - Amethyst
Preventive Conservation & Material Science Bernstein
Guided Tours and Congress Banquet Botanischer Garten und Botanisches
Museum
5:30 - 6:00 PM Busses leaving for the BGBM
6:30 - 7:30 PM Come together and guided tours behind the scene
collections and green houses
7:30 PM - Midnight Welcome, dinner and dancing
10:00 PM - Midnight Busses leaving for the andel's Hotel
Friday,
June 24
andel's Hotel Landsberger Allee
7:30 AM - 4:00 PM Registration Registration Desk, Lobby
8:30 AM - 2:00 PM Trade show Rubin
8:30 AM - 2:00 PM Poster display Rubin
2:00 - 4:00 PM Poster removal Rubin
8:30 - 9:50 AM Technical Sessions (concurrent)
SYNTHESYS Symposium: Developing a global research
infrastructure framework for bio-collections
Saphir 1
DemoCamp Saphir 2
Collections for the future - Future of collections - Amethyst
9:50 - 10:20 AM Break Rubin
10:20 - 11:40 AM Technical Sessions (concurrent)
SYNTHESYS Symposium: Developing a global research
infrastructure framework for bio-collections
Saphir 1
DemoCamp Saphir 2
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
32 33
AT ANDEL'S HOTEL
CONFERENCE PROGRAMME
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
34 35
TUESDAY, JUNE 21
Time Slot Program Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
9:00 AM Committee meetings
Amethyst 1: Legislation & Regulations
(Chair: Dirk Neumann), Amethyst 2: Long
Range Planning (Chair: Linda Ford)
Bernstein 1: Membership
(Chair: Tiffany Adrain)
10:00 AM Break
10:30 AM Committee meetings
Amethyst 1: Professional Development
(Chairs: Jeff Stephenson, Jennifer
Strotman), Amethyst 2: Conservation
(Chairs: Armando Mendez, Rebecca
Newberry, Cindy Opitz)
Bernstein 1: Best Practices/Documentation
(Chairs: Breda Zimkus, Jessica Cundiff),
Bernstein 2: International Relations (Chair:
Susan Ryder)
11:30 AM Committee meetings
Amethyst 1: Emerging Professionals
(Chair: Kari Harris) , Amethyst 2:
Publications (Chair: Christine Johnson)
Bernstein 1: Conference (Chair: Linda
Ford),Bernstein 2: Web (Chair: Ann
Molineaux)
12:30 PM Lunch
2:00 PM Opening Welcome and opening remarks
Christiane Quaisser, Chair
LOC
Andrew Bentley, President,
SPNHC council
Johannes C. Vogel, Director
General, MfN
Thomas Borsch, Director,
BGBM
Gabriele Droege, GGBN host
Ole Seberg, GGBN chair
3:00 PM Keynote SPNHC Michael Braungardt: The
'cradle to cradle' design
concept
4:00 PM Break
4:30 PM Keynote GGBN Ole Seberg: Preserving a Cross
Section of the Tree of Life
5:30 PM
SPNHC Council Meeting
9:00 AM General Session Green Museum
TUESDAY, JUNE 21
Time Slot Programme Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
9:00 AM Committee meetings
Amethyst 1: Legislation & Regulations
(Chair: Dirk Neumann), Amethyst 2: Long
Range Planning (Chair: Linda Ford)
Bernstein 1: Membership (Chair: Tiffany
Adrain)
10:00 AM Break
10:30 AM Committee meetings
Amethyst 1: Professional Development
(Chairs: Jeff Stephenson, Jennifer
Strotman), Amethyst 2: Conservation
(Chairs: Armando Mendez, Rebecca
Newberry, Cindy Opitz),
Bernstein 1: Best Practices/Documentation
(Chairs: Breda Zimkus, Jessica Cundiff),
Bernstein 2: International Relations (Chair:
Susan Ryder)
11:30 AM Committee meetings
Amethyst 1: Emerging Professionals (Chair:
Kari Harris) , Amethyst 2: Publications
(Chair: Christine Johnson)
Bernstein 1: Conference (Chair: Linda
Ford),Bernstein 2: Web (Chair: Ann
Molineaux) - Amethyst 2
12:30 PM Lunch
2:00 PM Opening Welcome and opening remarks
Christiane Quaisser,
SPNHC LOC
Andrew Bentley,
President, SPNHC council
Johannes C. Vogel,
Director General, MfN
Thomas Borsch,
Director, BGBM
Gabriele Droege, GGBN host
Ole Seberg, GGBN chair
3:00 PM Keynote SPNHC Michael Braungardt: The
'cradle to cradle' design
concept
4:00 PM Break
4:30 PM Keynote GGBN Ole Seberg: Preserving a Cross
Section of the Tree of Life
5:30 PM
SPNHC Council Meeting
9:00 AM General Session Green Museum
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
36 37
Time Slot Program Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
9:00 AM General Session Green Museum
9:00 AM Keynote General Session Timothy Fridtjof Flannery:
Optimising museum research
towards sustainability
10:00 AM Break
10:30 AM General Session Green Museum
10:30 AM Stefan Simon: Sustainable
conservation on the way to the
green museum
11:00 AM Stefan Simon et al.: On
the Way to the Green
Museum: Managing Risk
and Sustainability. Panel
Discussion
12:10 PM Lunch
Emerging Professionals Luncheon
1:20 PM Technical Sessions One Collection: pathways to
integration
Green Museum
1:20 PM Vincent Smith: Introduction
to One Collection: pathways to
integration
iDigBio Symposium: An
International Conversation
on Mobilizing Natural History
Collections (NHC) Data and
Integrating Data for Research
1:30 PM Sarah Phillips, Alan Paton,
Laura Green & Sandy
Knapp: Lessons learnt from
a herbarium specimen mass
digitisation pilot
Constanze Fuhrmann & Johanna Leissner:
Sustainable Museum – more than just
"going green"
1:50 PM Erica Krimmel & Dawn
Roberts: Evaluating collection
management systems for
interdisciplinary natural
history collections
Friedhelm Haas: Restoring the Large
Tropical Conservatory ("Großes Tropenhaus")
in the Botanic Garden of Berlin to energy
efficiency while considering aspects of
monument preservation
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22
Time Slot Programme Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
9:00 AM General Session Green Museum
9:00 AM Keynote General Session Timothy Fridtjof Flannery:
Optimising museum research
towards sustainability
10:00 AM Break
10:30 AM General Session Green Museum
10:30 AM Stefan Simon: Sustainable
conservation on the way to the
green museum
11:00 AM Stefan Simon et al.: On
the Way to the Green
Museum: Managing Risk
and Sustainability. Panel
Discussion
12:10 PM Lunch
Emerging Professionals Luncheon
1:20 PM Technical Sessions One Collection: pathways to
integration
Green Museum
1:20 PM Vincent Smith: Introduction
to One Collection: pathways to
integration
iDigBio Symposium: An
International Conversation
on Mobilizing Natural History
Collections (NHC) Data and
Integrating Data for Research
1:30 PM Sarah Phillips, Alan Paton,
Laura Green & Sandy
Knapp: Lessons learnt from
a herbarium specimen mass
digitisation pilot
Constanze Fuhrmann & Johanna Leissner:
Sustainable Museum – more than just
"going green"
1:50 PM Erica Krimmel & Dawn
Roberts: Evaluating collection
management systems for
interdisciplinary natural
history collections
Friedhelm Haas: Restoring the Large
Tropical Conservatory ("Großes Tropenhaus")
in the Botanic Garden of Berlin to energy
efficiency while considering aspects of
monument preservation
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
38 39
Time Slot Program Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
2:10 PM Philippa Brewer, Liadan
Stevens, Emma L Bernard,
Sandra Chapman, Lorna
Steel, Anna Taylor, Lyndsey
Douglas, David Godfrey,
Francesca Taylor, Vladimir
Blagoderov, Lawrence N.
Hudson, David Smith &
Molly Clery: eMesozoic:
an alternative approach to
digitising palaeontological
collections
Peter Bartsch, Ulrich Struck & Detlef
Willborn: Climate monitoring and
perspectives for a sensible use of a
marvelous old building
Part I: Design specifications and
strategies to ensure environmentally and
institutionally sustainable preservation
2:30 PM Gabriela M. Hogue: The Art of
Georeferencing: A case study
at the North Carolina Museum
of Natural Sciences
Catherine Hawks: The collection
environment
2:50 PM David Lazarus, Jeremy Young,
Shanan Peters & Johan
Renaudie: Paleontologic
collection data in the broader
context of paleontologic
research data systems
Jeff Hirsch: Understanding cost
management
3:10 PM Break
Poster Presentation
4:00 PM Technical Sessions iDigBio Symposium: An
International Conversation
on Mobilizing Natural History
Collections (NHC) Data and
Integrating Data for Research
Green Museum
4:00 PM Susan Butts, Talia Karim,
Chris Norris & Dena Smith:
iDigPaleo and ePANDDA:
digital infrastructure and tools
for collection discovery and
use
Walt Crimm: Design strategies for
sustainable solutions
Part II: Planning and assessment as
key components of environmentally and
institutionally sustainable preservation
4:20 PM Paul Mayer: How digitization
helped tame the Tully monster
Kelly Tomajko: Collection planning
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22
Time Slot Programme Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
2:10 PM Philippa Brewer, Liadan
Stevens, Emma L Bernard,
Sandra Chapman, Lorna
Steel, Anna Taylor, Lyndsey
Douglas, David Godfrey,
Francesca Taylor, Vladimir
Blagoderov, Lawrence N.
Hudson, David Smith &
Molly Clery: eMesozoic:
an alternative approach to
digitising palaeontological
collections
Peter Bartsch, Ulrich Struck & Detlef
Willborn: Climate monitoring and
perspectives for a sensible use of a
marvelous old building
Part I: Design specifications and
strategies to ensure environmentally and
institutionally sustainable preservation
2:30 PM Gabriela M. Hogue: The Art of
Georeferencing: A case study
at the North Carolina Museum
of Natural Sciences
Catherine Hawks: The collection
environment
2:50 PM David Lazarus, Jeremy Young,
Shanan Peters & Johan
Renaudie: Paleontologic
collection data in the broader
context of paleontologic
research data systems
Jeff Hirsch: Understanding cost
management
3:10 PM Break
Poster Presentation
4:00 PM Technical Sessions iDigBio Symposium: An
International Conversation
on Mobilizing Natural History
Collections (NHC) Data and
Integrating Data for Research
Green Museum
4:00 PM Susan Butts, Talia Karim,
Chris Norris & Dena Smith:
iDigPaleo and ePANDDA:
digital infrastructure and tools
for collection discovery and
use
Walt Crimm: Design strategies for
sustainable solutions
Part II: Planning and assessment as
key components of environmentally and
institutionally sustainable preservation
4:20 PM Paul Mayer: How digitization
helped tame the Tully monster
Kelly Tomajko: Collection planning
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
40 41
Time Slot Program Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
4:40 PM Shelley A James: Field to
database to aggregator and
beyond: documenting the flora
of Melanesia
Rob Waller & Jude Southward: Collection
Risk Assessment
5:00 PM Brian Westra: Data
Librarianship and Small
Collections Support
Jeff Weatherston: Collection space planning
6:30 -
9:30 PM
Optional Social Event
8:30 AM Technical Sessions SYNTHESYS Symposium:
Enabling Infrastructure:
Future Collections, Data &
Informatics
Digitizing and Imaging
Collections: New Methods,
Ideas, and Uses
Green Museum
8:30 AM Greg Riccardi: Digitization
Infrastructure in the US
Dawn Roberts & Erica
Krimmel: Assessing the
initial implementation of
Arctos in interdisciplinary
natural history collections
Susan H. Butts, Richard Boardman,
Amber Garrard, David Skelly, Tim White &
Kimberley Zolvik: Yale Peabody Museum‘s
sustainability action plan
8:50 AM Robert Guralnick, Michael
Denslow & Austin Mast: Notes
from Nature 2.0: Citizen
science at scale
Andrew Doran & Holly
Forbes: Connecting
Conservation and Collections:
The On-line Resources of the
University & Jepson Herbaria
and the UC Botanical Garden
at Berkeley
Christopher J. Huddleston: Constructing
and maintaining a large-scale tissue
collection: Lessons learned
9:10 AM Jiri Frank & Carolyn Sheffield:
Harnessing biodiversity
literature for Natural History
collections curation and
research – a digital library
perspective
Vladimir Blagoderov, E.
Louise Allan, Alex Ball,
Benjamin Price, Rebecca
Summerfield, Emma
Sherlock, Flavia Toloni &
Peter Wing: "To slide or not
to slide"—How do we scan
the Natural History Museum's
slide collections?
Christel Schollaardt, Mark Nesbitt & Roxali
Bijmoer: New uses for old collections:
rediscovering and redefining economic
botany
9:30 AM Matthew Collins : Text Mining
Whole Museum Datasets for
Expanding Understanding of
Collections with the GUODA
Service
Nelson Rios & Henry L.
Bart Jr.: COPIS: Prototyping
a Computer Operated
Photogrammetric Imaging
System
Pasquale Ciliberti: To kill or not to kill:
ethics of collecting insects
9:50 AM Break
Time Slot Program Saphir 1 Saphir 2 Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
4:40 PM Shelley A James: Field to
database to aggregator and
beyond: documenting the flora
of Melanesia
Rob Waller & Jude Southward: Collection
Risk Assessment
5:00 PM Brian Westra: Data
Librarianship and Small
Collections Support
Jeff Weatherston: Collection space planning
6:30 -
9:30 PM
Optional Social Event
8:30 AM Technical Sessions SYNTHESYS Symposium:
Enabling Infrastructure:
Future Collections, Data &
Informatics
Digitizing and Imaging
Collections: New Methods,
Ideas, and Uses
Green Museum
8:30 AM Greg Riccardi: Digitization
Infrastructure in the US
Dawn Roberts & Erica
Krimmel: Assessing the
initial implementation of
Arctos in interdisciplinary
natural history collections
Susan H. Butts, Richard Boardman,
Amber Garrard, David Skelly, Tim White &
Kimberley Zolvik: Yale Peabody Museum‘s
sustainability action plan
8:50 AM Robert Guralnick, Michael
Denslow & Austin Mast: Notes
from Nature 2.0: Citizen
science at scale
Andrew Doran & Holly
Forbes: Connecting
Conservation and Collections:
The On-line Resources of the
University & Jepson Herbaria
and the UC Botanical Garden
at Berkeley
Christopher J. Huddleston: Constructing
and maintaining a large-scale tissue
collection: Lessons learned
9:10 AM Jiri Frank & Carolyn Sheffield:
Harnessing biodiversity
literature for Natural History
collections curation and
research – a digital library
perspective
Vladimir Blagoderov, E.
Louise Allan, Alex Ball,
Benjamin Price, Rebecca
Summerfield, Emma
Sherlock, Flavia Toloni &
Peter Wing: "To slide or not
to slide"—How do we scan
the Natural History Museum's
slide collections?
Christel Schollaardt, Mark Nesbitt & Roxali
Bijmoer: New uses for old collections:
rediscovering and redefining economic
botany
9:30 AM Matthew Collins : Text Mining
Whole Museum Datasets for
Expanding Understanding of
Collections with the GUODA
Service
Nelson Rios & Henry L.
Bart Jr.: COPIS: Prototyping
a Computer Operated
Photogrammetric Imaging
System
Pasquale Ciliberti: To kill or not to kill:
ethics of collecting insects
9:50 AM Break
THURSDAY, JUNE 23
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22
Time Slot Program Saphir 1 Saphir 2 Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
4:40 PM Shelley A James: Field to
database to aggregator and
beyond: documenting the flora
of Melanesia
Rob Waller & Jude Southward: Collection
Risk Assessment
5:00 PM Brian Westra: Data
Librarianship and Small
Collections Support
Jeff Weatherston: Collection space planning
6:30 -
9:30 PM
Optional Social Event
8:30 AM Technical Sessions SYNTHESYS Symposium:
Enabling Infrastructure:
Future Collections, Data &
Informatics
Digitizing and Imaging
Collections: New Methods,
Ideas, and Uses
Green Museum
8:30 AM Greg Riccardi: Digitization
Infrastructure in the US
Dawn Roberts & Erica
Krimmel: Assessing the
initial implementation of
Arctos in interdisciplinary
natural history collections
Susan H. Butts, Richard Boardman,
Amber Garrard, David Skelly, Tim White &
Kimberley Zolvik: Yale Peabody Museum‘s
sustainability action plan
8:50 AM Robert Guralnick, Michael
Denslow & Austin Mast: Notes
from Nature 2.0: Citizen
science at scale
Andrew Doran & Holly
Forbes: Connecting
Conservation and Collections:
The On-line Resources of the
University & Jepson Herbaria
and the UC Botanical Garden
at Berkeley
Christopher J. Huddleston: Constructing
and maintaining a large-scale tissue
collection: Lessons learned
9:10 AM Jiri Frank & Carolyn Sheffield:
Harnessing biodiversity
literature for Natural History
collections curation and
research – a digital library
perspective
Vladimir Blagoderov, E.
Louise Allan, Alex Ball,
Benjamin Price, Rebecca
Summerfield, Emma
Sherlock, Flavia Toloni &
Peter Wing: "To slide or not
to slide"—How do we scan
the Natural History Museum's
slide collections?
Christel Schollaardt, Mark Nesbitt & Roxali
Bijmoer: New uses for old collections:
rediscovering and redefining economic
botany
9:30 AM Matthew Collins : Text Mining
Whole Museum Datasets for
Expanding Understanding of
Collections with the GUODA
Service
Nelson Rios & Henry L.
Bart Jr.: COPIS: Prototyping
a Computer Operated
Photogrammetric Imaging
System
Pasquale Ciliberti: To kill or not to kill:
ethics of collecting insects
9:50 AM Break
Time Slot Programme Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
4:40 PM Shelley A James: Field to
database to aggregator and
beyond: documenting the flora
of Melanesia
Rob Waller & Jude Southward: Collection
Risk Assessment
5:00 PM Brian Westra: Data
Librarianship and Small
Collections Support
Jeff Weatherston: Collection space planning
6:30 -
9:30 PM
Optional Social Event
8:30 AM Technical Sessions SYNTHESYS Symposium:
Enabling Infrastructure:
Future Collections, Data &
Informatics
Digitizing and Imaging
Collections: New Methods,
Ideas, and Uses
Green Museum
8:30 AM Greg Riccardi: Digitization
Infrastructure in the US
Dawn Roberts & Erica
Krimmel: Assessing the
initial implementation of
Arctos in interdisciplinary
natural history collections
Susan H. Butts, Richard Boardman,
Amber Garrard, David Skelly, Tim White &
Kimberley Zolvik: Yale Peabody Museum‘s
sustainability action plan
8:50 AM Robert Guralnick, Michael
Denslow & Austin Mast: Notes
from Nature 2.0: Citizen
science at scale
Andrew Doran & Holly
Forbes: Connecting
Conservation and Collections:
The On-line Resources of the
University & Jepson Herbaria
and the UC Botanical Garden
at Berkeley
Christopher J. Huddleston: Constructing
and maintaining a large-scale tissue
collection: Lessons learned
9:10 AM Jiri Frank & Carolyn Sheffield:
Harnessing biodiversity
literature for Natural History
collections curation and
research – a digital library
perspective
Vladimir Blagoderov, E.
Louise Allan, Alex Ball,
Benjamin Price, Rebecca
Summerfield, Emma
Sherlock, Flavia Toloni &
Peter Wing: "To slide or not
to slide"—How do we scan
the Natural History Museum's
slide collections?
Christel Schollaardt, Mark Nesbitt & Roxali
Bijmoer: New uses for old collections:
rediscovering and redefining economic
botany
9:30 AM Matthew Collins : Text Mining
Whole Museum Datasets for
Expanding Understanding of
Collections with the GUODA
Service
Nelson Rios & Henry L.
Bart Jr.: COPIS: Prototyping
a Computer Operated
Photogrammetric Imaging
System
Pasquale Ciliberti: To kill or not to kill:
ethics of collecting insects
9:50 AM Break
THURSDAY, JUNE 23
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
42 43
Time Slot Program Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
9:50 AM Break
10:20 AM Technical Sessions SYNTHESYS Symposium:
Enabling Infrastructure:
Future Collections, Data &
Informatics
Digitizing and Imaging
Collections: New Methods,
Ideas, and Uses
iDigBio Symposium 1: Small Collections
Symposium: Blending the educational
resources of small and large collections for
training the next generation of museum
professionals.
Preventive Conservation & Material Science
10:20 AM Elspeth Haston, Laurent
Albenga, Simon Chagnoux,
Robert Cubey, Robyn
Drinkwater, James Durrant,
Ed Gilbert, Falko Glöckler,
Laura Green, David Harris,
Jörg Holetschek, Lawrence
Hudson, Philip Kahle, Sally
King, Agnes Kirchhoff,
Alexander Kroupa, Jiří
Kvařek, Gwénaël Le Bras,
Laurence Livermore, Günter
Mühlberger, Deborah Paul,
Sarah Phillips, Larissa
Smirnova & František Vacek:
Automating capture of
metadata for natural history
specimens
Natalie Dale-Skey :
Streamlining specimens
digitisation through the
use of Inselect - a curator's
perspective
Anna K. Monfils, Libby Ellwood, Debra
Linton, Molly Phillips, Joseph A. Cook,
Joseph Kerski, Tracy Barbaro, Sam
Donovan, Karen Powers, L. Alan Prather &
Rob Guralnick: Integrating Natural History
Collections into Undergraduate Education:
Creating the Resources and Growing the
Community
Meghann Toner: A Smithsonian Institution
case study: Managing the movement of
bulky collections
10:40 AM Vincent Smith, Ben Scott &
Ed Baker: Data Portal and the
Graph of Life
Robyn Drinkwater, Elspeth
Haston, Sally King &
Erzsebet Gyongy: Using OCR
for QC in the digitisation
workflow of RBGE herbarium
Mare Nazaire: Preservation of natural
history collections through student
engagement: the internship experience at
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden
Majken Them Tøttrup: Moving of the
geological and botanical collections at
NHMD
11:00 AM Matt Woodburn & Laurence
Livermore: The Great
Migration: Negotiating the
path from physical object to
digital surrogate
Brittney Oleniacz: A Novel
Approach to Digitization
Efficiency in Invertebrate
Paleontology Collections
Randy Singer: Small collections can make
big waves in education and outreach
Paul Callomon & Gary Rosenberg: The plain
of jars: rehousing the Malacology alcohol
collection at the Academy of Natural
Sciences in Philadelphia
11:20 AM Robert Cubey: Are people
using natural history
specimen data? A comparison
of usage from an institutional
website versus large data
aggregators
Douglas G. D. Russell, Zoë
Varley, Lawrence Brooks &
Jörn P. W. Scharlemann:
Digital transcription improves
access to egg collections and
mobilizes phenological data
Elizabeth R. Ellwood, Paul Kimberly, Paul
Flemons, Robert Guralnick, Kevin Love &
Austin R. Mast: Educational opportunities
for small and large collections with the
Worldwide Engagement for Digitizing
Biocollections Event, WeDigBio 2016
Arianna Bernucci, Lorraine Cornish & Cheryl
Lynn: Blue Whale on the move: Dismantling
a 125 year-old specimen
THURSDAY, JUNE 23
Time Slot Programme Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
9:50 AM Break
10:20 AM Technical Sessions SYNTHESYS Symposium:
Enabling Infrastructure:
Future Collections, Data &
Informatics
Digitizing and Imaging
Collections: New Methods,
Ideas, and Uses
iDigBio Symposium 1: Small Collections
Symposium: Blending the educational
resources of small and large collections for
training the next generation of museum
professionals.
Preventive Conservation & Material Science
10:20 AM Elspeth Haston, Laurent
Albenga, Simon Chagnoux,
Robert Cubey, Robyn
Drinkwater, James Durrant,
Ed Gilbert, Falko Glöckler,
Laura Green, David Harris,
Jörg Holetschek, Lawrence
Hudson, Philip Kahle, Sally
King, Agnes Kirchhoff,
Alexander Kroupa, Jiří
Kvařek, Gwénaël Le Bras,
Laurence Livermore, Günter
Mühlberger, Deborah Paul,
Sarah Phillips, Larissa
Smirnova & František Vacek:
Automating capture of
metadata for natural history
specimens
Natalie Dale-Skey :
Streamlining specimens
digitisation through the
use of Inselect - a curator's
perspective
Anna K. Monfils, Libby Ellwood, Debra
Linton, Molly Phillips, Joseph A. Cook,
Joseph Kerski, Tracy Barbaro, Sam
Donovan, Karen Powers, L. Alan Prather &
Rob Guralnick: Integrating Natural History
Collections into Undergraduate Education:
Creating the Resources and Growing the
Community
Meghann Toner: A Smithsonian Institution
case study: Managing the movement of
bulky collections
10:40 AM Vincent Smith, Ben Scott &
Ed Baker: Data Portal and the
Graph of Life
Robyn Drinkwater, Elspeth
Haston, Sally King &
Erzsebet Gyongy: Using OCR
for QC in the digitisation
workflow of RBGE herbarium
Mare Nazaire: Preservation of natural
history collections through student
engagement: the internship experience at
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden
Majken Them Tøttrup: Moving of the
geological and botanical collections at
NHMD
11:00 AM Matt Woodburn & Laurence
Livermore: The Great
Migration: Negotiating the
path from physical object to
digital surrogate
Brittney Oleniacz: A Novel
Approach to Digitization
Efficiency in Invertebrate
Paleontology Collections
Randy Singer: Small collections can make
big waves in education and outreach
Paul Callomon & Gary Rosenberg: The plain
of jars: rehousing the Malacology alcohol
collection at the Academy of Natural
Sciences in Philadelphia
11:20 AM Robert Cubey: Are people
using natural history
specimen data? A comparison
of usage from an institutional
website versus large data
aggregators
Douglas G. D. Russell, Zoë
Varley, Lawrence Brooks &
Jörn P. W. Scharlemann:
Digital transcription improves
access to egg collections and
mobilizes phenological data
Elizabeth R. Ellwood, Paul Kimberly, Paul
Flemons, Robert Guralnick, Kevin Love &
Austin R. Mast: Educational opportunities
for small and large collections with the
Worldwide Engagement for Digitizing
Biocollections Event, WeDigBio 2016
Arianna Bernucci, Lorraine Cornish & Cheryl
Lynn: Blue Whale on the move: Dismantling
a 125 year-old specimen
THURSDAY, JUNE 23
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
44 45
Time Slot Program Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
11:40 AM Paul J Morris, James Hanken,
David B. Lowery, Bertram
Ludäscher, James A. Macklin,
Timothy McPhillips, Robert
A. Morris, Antonio Mauro
Saraiva, Tianhong Song,
Allan Koch Veiga & John
Wieczorek: Error? What Error?
Expectation management in
reporting data quality issues
to data curators.
Sylke Frahnert: Improving the
collecting data of historical
museum specimens
Emily Gillespie: The Marshall University
Herbarium: A model for engaging student
curators in small herbarium digitization
efforts
Julian Carter & Dirk Neumann: 'Avoiding
a pickle'- Developing standards for the
sustainable care and conservation of fluid
preserved collections
12:00 PM Lunch
Vendor's Lunch
1:10 PM Technical Sessions SYNTHESYS Symposium:
Enabling Infrastructure:
Future Collections, Data &
Informatics
Digitizing and Imaging
Collections: New Methods,
Ideas, and Uses
iDigBio Symposium 1: Small Collections
Symposium: Blending the educational
resources of small and large collections for
training the next generation of museum
professionals.
Preventive Conservation & Material Science
1:10 PM Deirdre Ryan & Barbara
Thiers: Global Plants: A Model
of International Collaboration
Cindy Opitz & Trina E.
Roberts: Historic collections
going global: Digitization
at the University of Iowa
Museum of Natural History
Kari M. Harris & Travis D. Marsico:
Involving undergraduates in the digital
community: Leveraging collections
preservation, research, and outreach
through a network of natural history
collections clubs
Gregory J. Watkins-Colwell: From body
bags to boxes of bones; Herpetology and
ichthyology skeletal preparation at Yale
Peabody Museum of Natural History
1:30 PM Gisela Baumann, Wolf-
Henning Kusber, Jörg
Holetschek, Anton Güntsch,
Walter G. Berendsohn: Natural
history online - An efficient
data publication framework
for museum collections
Henry L. Bart Jr. & Nelson
E. Rios: Enhancing FishNet2
to Increase Access of
Developing Country Scientists
to Fish Specimens Records in
Developed Country Museums
Andrew Doran & Holly Forbes: Training
the next generation of botanists: small
collections at the University of California,
Berkeley Herbaria and Botanical Garden
Véronique Rouchon: Preserving iron sulfate
bearing papers
1:50 PM Riitta Tegelberg, Janne
Karppinen, Zhengzhe Wu,
Jere Kahanpää & Hannu
Saarenmaa: Automating the
Insect Digitization – Speed
and Costs
Kate Andrew, Daniel Lockett,
Jackie Tweddle & Michael
Rosenbaum: Releasing the
potential of a significant
regional geology collection
through digitisation and
working with partners that
include an experimental
game designer
Deborah L. Paul, Matthew Collins, Laurence
Livermore & Dimitrios Koureas: Museum
and Collections Biodiversity Informatics:
Meeting skills needs for creating, sharing,
and using the digital relatives of museum
specimens
Steffen Bock: Deterioration processes in
skins and hides of mammal collections
2:10 PM Mira Silanova: WITIKON:
Mass 3D digitisation at a
national scale
Richard K. Rabeler: Using
specimen portals for floristics
research
Zack Murrell: Development of a human
infrastructure: SERNEC as a case study
Magdalena Grenda-Kurmanow: Challenges
of conservation treatment of historic
herbaria
THURSDAY, JUNE 23
Time Slot Programme Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
11:40 AM Paul J Morris, James Hanken,
David B. Lowery, Bertram
Ludäscher, James A. Macklin,
Timothy McPhillips, Robert
A. Morris, Antonio Mauro
Saraiva, Tianhong Song,
Allan Koch Veiga & John
Wieczorek: Error? What Error?
Expectation management in
reporting data quality issues
to data curators.
Sylke Frahnert: Improving the
collecting data of historical
museum specimens
Emily Gillespie: The Marshall University
Herbarium: A model for engaging student
curators in small herbarium digitization
efforts
Julian Carter & Dirk Neumann: 'Avoiding
a pickle'- Developing standards for the
sustainable care and conservation of fluid
preserved collections
12:00 PM Lunch
Vendor's Lunch
1:10 PM Technical Sessions SYNTHESYS Symposium:
Enabling Infrastructure:
Future Collections, Data &
Informatics
Digitizing and Imaging
Collections: New Methods,
Ideas, and Uses
iDigBio Symposium 1: Small Collections
Symposium: Blending the educational
resources of small and large collections for
training the next generation of museum
professionals.
Preventive Conservation & Material Science
1:10 PM Deirdre Ryan & Barbara
Thiers: Global Plants: A Model
of International Collaboration
Cindy Opitz & Trina E.
Roberts: Historic collections
going global: Digitization
at the University of Iowa
Museum of Natural History
Kari M. Harris & Travis D. Marsico:
Involving undergraduates in the digital
community: Leveraging collections
preservation, research, and outreach
through a network of natural history
collections clubs
Gregory J. Watkins-Colwell: From body
bags to boxes of bones; Herpetology and
ichthyology skeletal preparation at Yale
Peabody Museum of Natural History
1:30 PM Gisela Baumann, Wolf-
Henning Kusber, Jörg
Holetschek, Anton Güntsch,
Walter G. Berendsohn: Natural
history online - An efficient
data publication framework
for museum collections
Henry L. Bart Jr. & Nelson
E. Rios: Enhancing FishNet2
to Increase Access of
Developing Country Scientists
to Fish Specimens Records in
Developed Country Museums
Andrew Doran & Holly Forbes: Training
the next generation of botanists: small
collections at the University of California,
Berkeley Herbaria and Botanical Garden
Véronique Rouchon: Preserving iron sulfate
bearing papers
1:50 PM Riitta Tegelberg, Janne
Karppinen, Zhengzhe Wu,
Jere Kahanpää & Hannu
Saarenmaa: Automating the
Insect Digitization – Speed
and Costs
Kate Andrew, Daniel Lockett,
Jackie Tweddle & Michael
Rosenbaum: Releasing the
potential of a significant
regional geology collection
through digitisation and
working with partners that
include an experimental
game designer
Deborah L. Paul, Matthew Collins, Laurence
Livermore & Dimitrios Koureas: Museum
and Collections Biodiversity Informatics:
Meeting skills needs for creating, sharing,
and using the digital relatives of museum
specimens
Steffen Bock: Deterioration processes in
skins and hides of mammal collections
2:10 PM Mira Silanova: WITIKON:
Mass 3D digitisation at a
national scale
Richard K. Rabeler: Using
specimen portals for floristics
research
Zack Murrell: Development of a human
infrastructure: SERNEC as a case study
Magdalena Grenda-Kurmanow: Challenges
of conservation treatment of historic
herbaria
THURSDAY, JUNE 23
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
46 47
Time Slot Program Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
2:30 PM Deb Paul, Philip van Heerden,
Vince Smith, Laurence
Livermore & Ehsan Alavi
Fazel: A Bridge from Enabling
Infrastructure to Digitization
Priorities, a view from industry
Yvette Harvey & Jonathan
Gregson: Recreating a long-
lost herbarium
Mary Beth Prondzinski: Engaging student
awareness of museum collections
Pascal Querner: Integrated Pest
Management in Austrian Natural History
Museums - A sustainable approach
2:50 PM Break
3:20 PM Technical Sessions GBIF TF Symposium: Setting
global and local digitization
priorities
Digitizing and Imaging
Collections: New Methods,
Ideas, and Uses
Collections for the future - Future of
collections -
Preventive Conservation & Material Science
3:20 PM Leonard Krishtalka: The
Digitization Dilemma: Setting
“demand-driven” priorities
and why it matters
Patricia Nutter & Erin Bilyeu:
Digitization in the office
of the registrar: Saving our
documents for the future
James DV. Alvarez, Juan Carlos T. Gonzalez,
Phillip A. Alviola, Andres Tomas L. Dans,
Edison A. Cosico & Florante A. Cruz: Rabor
Wildlife Collection: Today’s record for
understanding remarkable biodiversity of
the Philippine islands
Tom Strang & Jeremy Jacobs: Seeing is
believing, a fourteen year study on efficacy
and economics of visual inspections to
protect a large mammal collection.
3:40 PM Barbara M. Thiers: Principles
for Setting Digitization
Priorities for Herbaria
Kamal Khidas & Stéphanie
Tessier: Building next-
generation collections:
Challenges in digitizing
already digitized collections
Amanda Lawrence & Leslie Hale: A rock
without data is just a rock: The importance
of systematically integrating orphaned
collections
Fran Ritchie, Julia Sybalsky, Caitlin
Richeson & Kelly McCauley: Performing
a condition survey of historic mammalian
taxidermy
4:00 PM Masanori Nakae & Tsuyoshi
Hosoya: Prioritization in
digitization of natural history
collections in Asia – the cases
of some Asian countries
Jennifer Thomas : Bringing
dark data to light – how do
we keep the lights on?
Travis D. Marsico, Jennifer N. Reed,
Samantha Worthy, Lauren Whitehurst,
Kevin S. Burgess & Rima D. Lucardi: Small
herbaria as repositories for invasive species
and federal noxious weed vouchers in
collaborative research
Amy Trafford & Lu Allington-Jones:
Combining digitisation and sustainable
conservation: The Airless Project
4:20 PM Deborah Paul, Siro Masinde,
Shari Ellis, Leonard
Krishtalka, Barbara Thiers,
Jean Ganglo, Eduardo Dalcin
& Masanori Nakae: A global
survey of natural history
collections
Josefina Barreiro, Celia M.
Santos-Mazorra, Marisol
Alonso & Marian Ramos:
Preliminary analysis of
effectiveness and accuracy
of crowdsourcing vs in-situ
digitisation methods
Ann Bogaerts, Steven Janssens, Dakis-
Yaoba Ouédraogo, Peter Hietz, Adeline
Fayolle, Anaïs-Pasiphaé Gorel, Brecht
Verstraeten, Sofie De Smedt & Piet
Stoffelen: New technologies lead to new
uses in the herbarium of the Botanic
Garden Meise
Luc Willemse & Max Caspers: Permanent
storage of Lepidoptera in glassine
envelopes: reducing resources while
optimizing accessibility
4:40 PM Ian Owens: The new
enlightenment: digital
collections and the
re-invention of large natural
history museums
Travis D. Marsico & Kari M.
Harris: Frank discussion of
small herbarium digitization
options for the lost, confused,
weary, under-budgeted, and
over-stimulated
Eileen Graham & David Schindel: Scientific
collections and food security: their role in
predicting and protecting our future food
supply
Walt Crimm: External forces on collections
care & storage spaces: Recommendations
for balancing with equal and non-
oppositional forces
6:30 PM
- Midnight
Guided Tours and Congress
Banquet, BGBM
THURSDAY, JUNE 23
Time Slot Programme Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
2:30 PM Deb Paul, Philip van Heerden,
Vince Smith, Laurence
Livermore & Ehsan Alavi
Fazel: A Bridge from Enabling
Infrastructure to Digitization
Priorities, a view from industry
Yvette Harvey & Jonathan
Gregson: Recreating a long-
lost herbarium
Mary Beth Prondzinski: Engaging student
awareness of museum collections
Pascal Querner: Integrated Pest
Management in Austrian Natural History
Museums - A sustainable approach
2:50 PM Break
3:20 PM Technical Sessions GBIF TF Symposium: Setting
global and local digitization
priorities
Digitizing and Imaging
Collections: New Methods,
Ideas, and Uses
Collections for the future - Future of
collections -
Preventive Conservation & Material Science
3:20 PM Leonard Krishtalka: The
Digitization Dilemma: Setting
“demand-driven” priorities
and why it matters
Patricia Nutter & Erin Bilyeu:
Digitization in the office
of the registrar: Saving our
documents for the future
James DV. Alvarez, Juan Carlos T. Gonzalez,
Phillip A. Alviola, Andres Tomas L. Dans,
Edison A. Cosico & Florante A. Cruz: Rabor
Wildlife Collection: Today’s record for
understanding remarkable biodiversity of
the Philippine islands
Tom Strang & Jeremy Jacobs: Seeing is
believing, a fourteen year study on efficacy
and economics of visual inspections to
protect a large mammal collection.
3:40 PM Barbara M. Thiers: Principles
for Setting Digitization
Priorities for Herbaria
Kamal Khidas & Stéphanie
Tessier: Building next-
generation collections:
Challenges in digitizing
already digitized collections
Amanda Lawrence & Leslie Hale: A rock
without data is just a rock: The importance
of systematically integrating orphaned
collections
Fran Ritchie, Julia Sybalsky, Caitlin
Richeson & Kelly McCauley: Performing
a condition survey of historic mammalian
taxidermy
4:00 PM Masanori Nakae & Tsuyoshi
Hosoya: Prioritization in
digitization of natural history
collections in Asia – the cases
of some Asian countries
Jennifer Thomas : Bringing
dark data to light – how do
we keep the lights on?
Travis D. Marsico, Jennifer N. Reed,
Samantha Worthy, Lauren Whitehurst,
Kevin S. Burgess & Rima D. Lucardi: Small
herbaria as repositories for invasive species
and federal noxious weed vouchers in
collaborative research
Amy Trafford & Lu Allington-Jones:
Combining digitisation and sustainable
conservation: The Airless Project
4:20 PM Deborah Paul, Siro Masinde,
Shari Ellis, Leonard
Krishtalka, Barbara Thiers,
Jean Ganglo, Eduardo Dalcin
& Masanori Nakae: A global
survey of natural history
collections
Josefina Barreiro, Celia M.
Santos-Mazorra, Marisol
Alonso & Marian Ramos:
Preliminary analysis of
effectiveness and accuracy
of crowdsourcing vs in-situ
digitisation methods
Ann Bogaerts, Steven Janssens, Dakis-
Yaoba Ouédraogo, Peter Hietz, Adeline
Fayolle, Anaïs-Pasiphaé Gorel, Brecht
Verstraeten, Sofie De Smedt & Piet
Stoffelen: New technologies lead to new
uses in the herbarium of the Botanic
Garden Meise
Luc Willemse & Max Caspers: Permanent
storage of Lepidoptera in glassine
envelopes: reducing resources while
optimizing accessibility
4:40 PM Ian Owens: The new
enlightenment: digital
collections and the
re-invention of large natural
history museums
Travis D. Marsico & Kari M.
Harris: Frank discussion of
small herbarium digitization
options for the lost, confused,
weary, under-budgeted, and
over-stimulated
Eileen Graham & David Schindel: Scientific
collections and food security: their role in
predicting and protecting our future food
supply
Walt Crimm: External forces on collections
care & storage spaces: Recommendations
for balancing with equal and non-
oppositional forces
6:30 PM
- Midnight
Guided Tours and Congress
Banquet, BGBM
THURSDAY, JUNE 23
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
48 49
Time Slot Program Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
8:30 AM Technical Sessions SYNTHESYS Symposium:
Developing a global research
infrastructure framework for
bio-collections
DemoCamp
Collections for the future - Future of
collections -
8:30 AM Dimitris Koureas & Ana
Casino: Introduction / Scoping
/ Expectations
Paul J. Morris, James
Hanken, David B. Lowery,
Bertram Ludäscher, James A.
Macklin, Timothy McPhillips,
Robert A. Morris, John
Wieczorek & Qian Zhang:
Kurator: Extensible and
accessible tools for quality
assessment of biodiversity
data
Jeanine Vélez Gavilán: Building systems
and capacity to monitor and conserve BVI's
flora
8:50 AM Maarten Heerlien: Building
the pan-European Natural
History Collections Research
Infrastructure
Jason Best & Tiana Rehman:
Rapid collection inventories
Emma Sherlock, Keiron D. Brown & Duncan
Sivell: Museums, keys, recording schemes
and amateur naturalists. Why museums
underpin the recording movement and why
its crucial they continue
9:10 AM Barbara Thiers: The
Biodiversity Collections
Network (BCoN): Promoting
the Use of Digitized
Biocollections Data for
Research and Education
Martin Pullan & Robert
Cubey: Rapid filtering
application design and
implementation
Andrew Bentley: Biodiversity Collections
Network (BCoN) Research Coordination
Network (RCN): Sustainability, advocacy
and community
9:30 AM Donald Hobern: Challenges
and Needs at the Global Scale
– Sharing Resources and
Expertise
Lawrence N Hudson,
Elizabeth Louise Allan,
Vladimir Blagoderov, Natalie
Dale-Skey, Alice Heaton,
Pieter Holtzhausen, Laurence
Livermore, Benjamin W Price,
Emma Sherlock, Stéfan van
der Walt & Vincent S Smith:
Inselect - applying computer
vision to facilitate rapid
record creation and metadata
capture
Britta Horstmann: The Leibniz Association
and its eight research museums
9:50 AM Break
10:20 AM Technical Sessions SYNTHESYS Symposium:
Developing a global research
infrastructure framework for
bio-collections
DemoCamp Collections stewardship and policies
FRIDAY, JUNE 24
Time Slot Programme Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
8:30 AM Technical Sessions SYNTHESYS Symposium:
Developing a global research
infrastructure framework for
bio-collections
DemoCamp
Collections for the future - Future of
collections -
8:30 AM Dimitris Koureas & Ana
Casino: Introduction / Scoping
/ Expectations
Paul J. Morris, James
Hanken, David B. Lowery,
Bertram Ludäscher, James A.
Macklin, Timothy McPhillips,
Robert A. Morris, John
Wieczorek & Qian Zhang:
Kurator: Extensible and
accessible tools for quality
assessment of biodiversity
data
Jeanine Vélez Gavilán: Building systems
and capacity to monitor and conserve BVI's
flora
8:50 AM Maarten Heerlien: Building
the pan-European Natural
History Collections Research
Infrastructure
Jason Best & Tiana Rehman:
Rapid collection inventories
Emma Sherlock, Keiron D. Brown & Duncan
Sivell: Museums, keys, recording schemes
and amateur naturalists. Why museums
underpin the recording movement and why
its crucial they continue
9:10 AM Barbara Thiers: The
Biodiversity Collections
Network (BCoN): Promoting
the Use of Digitized
Biocollections Data for
Research and Education
Martin Pullan & Robert
Cubey: Rapid filtering
application design and
implementation
Andrew Bentley: Biodiversity Collections
Network (BCoN) Research Coordination
Network (RCN): Sustainability, advocacy
and community
9:30 AM Donald Hobern: Challenges
and Needs at the Global Scale
– Sharing Resources and
Expertise
Lawrence N Hudson,
Elizabeth Louise Allan,
Vladimir Blagoderov, Natalie
Dale-Skey, Alice Heaton,
Pieter Holtzhausen, Laurence
Livermore, Benjamin W Price,
Emma Sherlock, Stéfan van
der Walt & Vincent S Smith:
Inselect - applying computer
vision to facilitate rapid
record creation and metadata
capture
Britta Horstmann: The Leibniz Association
and its eight research museums
9:50 AM Break
10:20 AM Technical Sessions SYNTHESYS Symposium:
Developing a global research
infrastructure framework for
bio-collections
DemoCamp Collections stewardship and policies
FRIDAY, JUNE 24
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
50 51
FRIDAY, JUNE 24
Time Slot Program Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
Collections stewardship and policies
10:20 AM Helen Glaves: Integrating
e-infrastructures to support
environmental research: a use
case from the marine domain
Adele Crane, Eileen Graham
& David Schindel: Global
Registry of Scientific
Collections (GRSciColl):
Function and application
Christiane Quaisser: Wind of change –
Collections stewardship at the Museum für
Naturkunde Berlin between tradition and
cultural change
10:40 AM Norman Morrison: FAIR-
trading. Promoting data
exchange through ELIXIR
Interoperability tools and
services
Kessy Abarenkov, Urmas
Kõljalg, Allan Zirk & Veljo
Runnel: PlutoF – online
solution for the common
biological data management
and Open Data
Peter Giere, Dirk Neumann & Conny
Löhne: Access and Benefit Sharing:
implementation and implications
11:00 AM Panel and open discussion Timothy McPhillips, Qian
Zhang, Bertram Ludäscher,
James Hanken, David B.
Lowery, James A. Macklin,
Paul J. Morris, Robert A.
Morris, Laura Russell &
John Wieczorek: Using
YesWorkflow to explore the
results of cleaning a dataset
using a script
Erika M. Gardner & Rusty Russell:
From policy to procedures: designing,
constructing and documenting a complete
herbarium procedure manual
11:20 AM Panel and open discussion Matthew Collins, Jorrit Poelen
& Alexander Thompson:
Whole-dataset processing
of biological collections
and other data sources as a
service - Demonstration of
GUODA
Wendy van Bohemen & Nicolien Sol:
Loaning without moaning
12:00 PM Lunch Annual Business Meeting
Luncheon
2:00 PM Optional: Special Interest
Groups, collection tours,
etc.
4:00 PM Closure of the Conference
Time Slot Programme Saphir 1 Saphir 2
Amethyst Bernstein Rubin
10:20 AM Technical Sessions SYNTHESYS Symposium:
Developing a global research
infrastructure framework for
bio-collections
DemoCamp
Collections stewardship and policies
10:20 AM Helen Glaves: Integrating
e-infrastructures to support
environmental research: a use
case from the marine domain
Adele Crane, Eileen Graham
& David Schindel: Global
Registry of Scientific
Collections (GRSciColl):
Function and application
Christiane Quaisser: Wind of change –
Collections stewardship at the Museum für
Naturkunde Berlin between tradition and
cultural change
10:40 AM Norman Morrison: FAIR-
trading. Promoting data
exchange through ELIXIR
Interoperability tools and
services
Kessy Abarenkov, Urmas
Kõljalg, Allan Zirk & Veljo
Runnel: PlutoF – online
solution for the common
biological data management
and Open Data
Peter Giere, Dirk Neumann & Conny
Löhne: Access and Benefit Sharing:
implementation and implications
11:00 AM Panel and open discussion Timothy McPhillips, Qian
Zhang, Bertram Ludäscher,
James Hanken, David B.
Lowery, James A. Macklin,
Paul J. Morris, Robert A.
Morris, Laura Russell &
John Wieczorek: Using
YesWorkflow to explore the
results of cleaning a dataset
using a script
Erika M. Gardner & Rusty Russell:
From policy to procedures: designing,
constructing and documenting a complete
herbarium procedure manual
11:20 AM Panel and open discussion Matthew Collins, Jorrit Poelen
& Alexander Thompson:
Whole-dataset processing
of biological collections
and other data sources as a
service - Demonstration of
GUODA
Wendy van Bohemen & Nicolien Sol:
Loaning without moaning
12:00 PM Lunch Annual Business Meeting
Luncheon
2:00 PM Optional: Special Interest
Groups, collection tours,
etc.
4:00 PM Closure of the Conference
FRIDAY, JUNE 24
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
52 53
DOE! Mass digitisation of the BR Herbarium at Botanic
Garden Meise
Sofie De Smedt, Ann Bogaerts, Piet Stoffelen, Quentin
Groom, Henry Engledow, Marc Sosef, Paul Van
Wambeke and Steven Dessein
The effect of light on vertebrate fossils: Exhibition,
collection and artificial aging
Mariana Di Giacomo
Zipped up: sealing large formalin specimens for
storage and transport.
Esther Dondorp
Clear as glass: digitizing 100,000 glass slides from
the Naturalis collection using an online crowdsourcing
platform
Karen van Dorp
See something, say something. Using visiting
researchers to help locate deteriorating avian study
specimens
Christina A. Gebhard
Brief Summary of the National Herbarium (ETH)
Fiseha Getachew
"Zentrum für Sammlungen" – a Berlin network of
museums and museum related institutions
Peter Giere, Dorothee Haffner and Alexandra Jeberien
for the members of the network
What do users want from a herbarium’s web portal?
Quentin Groom, Henry Engledow, Sofie De Smedt and
Paul Van Wambeke
The preservation and display of a ‘black smoker’
hydrothermal vent at University Museum of Zoology
Cambridge
Natalie Jones
Pigment based ink-jet printers: Use in collection
management at the National Museum of Natural
History, Smithsonian Institution
W. Geoff Keel, Diane E. Pitassy, and William E. Moser
Information Extraction from Herbarium Sheets - The
StanDAP-Herb Project
Agnes Kirchhoff, Dominik Röpert, Anton Güntsch,
Walter G. Berendsohn, E. Santamaria, U. Bügel, F.
Chaves-S., C. Guan, H. Zheng, and K.-H. Steinke
CollectionsEducation.org: Connecting students to
citizen science and curated collections
Erica R. Krimmel, Debra L. Linton, Travis D. Marsico,
Anna K. Monfils, Ashley B. Morris, Brad R. Ruhfel
Palms and Carl von Martius in the Botanic Garden
Meise
Viviane Leyman, Sofie De Smedt, and Piet Stoffelen
Needle felting fills: Creating fills for areas of fur loss
using needle felting as a technique
Suzie Li Wan Po
The IPM quarantine facilities at the NHM
Armando Mendez , Roberto Portela Miguez and
Suzanne Ryder
AQUiLA – a platform for biodiversity data Generic data
model and full-featured text search engine– a good
match?
Lothar Menner and Andreas Allspach
The Value of DNA Barcoding for Collections
Management
Christopher M. Milensky Christopher J. Huddleston,
and David Schindel
Using Laponite gel for removing papyrus backings of
poor quality cardboard
Amr Moustafa, Moamen Othman, Mohamed Abdel-
Rahman Ahmed Tarek
Comparison of two lid types for museum fluid
collections
Kirsten E. Nicholson and Lillian Hendricks
The type collection at the National Herbarium of
Mexico (MEXU): a very dynamic and active collection
Helga Ochoterena and María del Rosario García Peña
Historic collections going global: Digitization at the
University of Iowa Museum of Natural History.
Cindy Opitz and Trina E. Roberts
Incorporating Genetic Sampling into a Traditional
Botanical Voucher Workflow
Melinda Peters and Amanda Devine
Extant Brazilian mammals in scientific collections of
Europe: an update
Alexandra Maria Ramos Bezerra
Re-housing bird eggs and nests at the Michigan State
University Museum.
Laura Abraczinskas and Barbara Lundrigan
Challenges in curating two fossil plant collections at
the University of Iowa Paleontology Repository
Tiffany S. Adrain, Maja Stina Sunleaf, and Kaitlin
Schlotfelt
Making sustainability work
Gretchen Anderson, Amy Covell-Murthy, Deborah
Harding, and Amy Henrici
Curating the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew Spirit
Collection
Melissa Bavington
Preserving iron sulfate specimens
Oulfa Belhadj Cristiano Ferraris, Jean Marc Fourcault
and Véronique Rouchon
AnnoSys: A generic online annotation system for
scientific collections
Walter G. Berendsohn, Lutz Suhrbier, Wolf-Henning
Kusber, and Anton Güntsch
Integrating diverse resources at the New York Botanical
Garden for specimen-based botanical research
Lisa Campbell, Kimberly Watson, Melissa Tulig
Updates on whole-dataset analyses using Spark and
the GUODA data service
Matthew Collins, Jorrit Poelen, and Alexander
Thompson
To fade or not to fade… Monitoring exhibit light levels
and color changes to manage risk of light damage
Maureen DaRos White Paul Whitmore, and Catherine
Sease
Rehousing Tapa – a project to repair, photograph and
improve the storage conditions of barkcloths at the
Yale Peabody Museum
Rebekah DeAngelo, Aliza Taft, Catherine Sease
Natural resins sold today: are they correct and pure?
Louise Decq, Vincent Cattersel, Piet Stoffelen, Viviane
Leyman, Charles Indekeu, Delphine Steyaert, Emile
Van Binnebeke, Wim Fremout, Steven Saverwyns
LIST
POSTER PRESENTATIONS
SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme SPNHC 2016 – Conference programme
54 55
Digitzing eocene fossil collections for global change
research
Brian Rankin and Patricia Holroyd
Mobilizing biodiversity data in a megadiverse country:
the online collections of Colombia’s Instituto de
Ciencias Naturales
Lauren Raz, Henry D. Agudelo-Zamora, and Andrés E.
Páez Torres
Filling feather loss: Tricks & tips
Fran Ritchie and Julia Sybalsky
Low-quality images to manage scientific collections of
fossils: the case of Paleobotany and fossil invertebrate
collection of the MNCN-CSIC
Celia M. Santos-Mazorra
Data-basing of the mineral and rock/ore collection at
Museum für Naturkunde Berlin - looking backward and
forward
Ralf T. Schmitt and Regina Brückner
Greenovations! Benefits and drawbacks to the LEED
Silver Certification Renovations of Pod 3
Leslie Schuhmann and Christine Geer Chagnon
Natural history education using marine debris: A
hands-on beachcombing museum display
Akihiko Suzuki and Takafumi Enya
Building systems and capacity to monitor and conserve
the flora of the British Virgin Islands
Jeanine Vélez Gavilán Martin Hamilton, Sara Barrios,
Thomas Heller, José Sustache, Omar Monsegur, Nancy
Woodfield-Pascoe, Natasha Harrigan
Crowdsourcing specimen labels — the Crab Shack
experience
Regina Wetzer and N. Dean Pentcheff
Digitization of Dearness Fungal Type Collection
Jennifer Wilkinson and Scott Redhead
Butterflies in bags: saving time, space and money
Luc Willemse and Max Caspers
How green thinking is practiced when shipping
specimens.
Robert Wilson
SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts
56 57
SPNHC 2016
ABSTRACTS
SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts
58 59
“The need for true innovation has never been more profound then now. Deep-rooted structures
and systems are being challenged to change. Just to be less bad, is simply not good enough.
We are capable to think circular and create high-quality alternatives which are effective and
beneficial for humans and nature. With this message Cradle to Cradle supports people to
go beyond our traditional patterns and mindsets. If the future can be positive, why choose
differently?”
For decades, Prof. Dr. Michael Braungart has pioneered the Cradle to Cradle design concept.
He co-authored (with William McDonough) the bestselling book of the same name, and
has lectured at universities in Europe, America and Asia. His expertise has been published
in numerous international magazines and journals. He has worked with several scientific
institutes and companies across a range of industries, and has developed tools for designing
eco-effective products, business systems and intelligent materials pooling. This approach
paves the way to a new economic system for which, innovation, positivity, quality and creativity
are key. That this can work, show hundreds of products that have been developed according to
this principle. Nature is for Prof. Dr. Michael Braungart a source of inspiration and shows us
how we can increase our positive footprint and celebrate life.
The Global Genome Biodiversity Network (GGBN) was formed with the principal aim of making
high-quality well-documented collections storing genomic samples (e.g. DNA, RNA and whole
tissues) of biodiversity, discoverable for research.
However, with in excess of 1.4-1.8 million known and 11-14 million unknown species, the
task of creating an intelligent subsampling of this diversity is a formidable one. Even worse,
information on existing genomic samples spread across biodiversity biobanks has proven to be
fragmented, inhibiting scientific research and discovery. Accordingly many scientists consider
a lack in availability of high quality genomic samples a serious bottle-neck to their research.
To alleviate these problems and help humanity to store an intelligent subset of the world’s
biodiversity, the Global Genome Biodiversity Network (GGBN) was created in 2011.
Thus, the aims of GGBN are to foster a shared interest in long-term preservation of genomic
samples that represent the diversity of non-human life on Earth. GGBN provides a platform for
biodiversity biobanks from across the world to:
Collaborate to ensure consistent quality standards for DNA and tissue collections,
Improve best practices for the preservation and use of such collections,
Harmonize exchange and use of genetic materials in accordance with national and
international legislation and conventions.
By making Genomic Collections discoverable for research through a trusted and networked
community of biorepositories GGBN will enable a targeted sampling of life on Earth for the
benefit of generations to come.
The biological collections held in natural history museums are a unique asset. Properly
interrogated, they can provide key data in regard to the biological response to climate change,
ocean acidification, epidemic diseases, their spread and host switching, and genetic and
morphological changes over time. They are also a unique repository of information regarding
the ecology and genetics of extinct taxa.
The challenges to sustainability have never been so complex, nor the potential solutions so
varied. From managing genetic diversity in relict populations, to responding to the pressures of
climate change and the 're-wilding' of landscapes, the natural history museum, its collections
and research capacities are increasingly vital.
Some examples from Australia and elsewhere will be discussed to illustrate these points.
KEYNOTE LECTURE SPNHC
The 'cradle to cradle' design
concept
Michael Braungart* 1
1 EPEA Internationale Umweltforschung GmbH, 20457
Hamburg, Germany
* braungart@braungart.com
KEYNOTE LECTURE GGBN
Preserving a Cross Section of
the Tree of Life
Ole Seberg* 1
1 Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of
Copenhagen, 1307 Copenhagen, Denmark
* oles@snm.ku.dk
KEYNOTE LECTURE GREEN MUSEUM –
HOW TO PRACTICE WHAT WE PREACH?
(GENERAL SESSION)
Optimising museum research
towards sustainability.
Timothy Fridtjof Flannery* 1
1 Melbourne School of Design, The University of Melbourne,
Parkville Victoria 3010, Australia
* timothy.flannery@unimelb.edu.au
SPNHC 2016
KEYNOTE LECTURES
SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts
60 61
ABSTRACT
Sustainable development —the concept of meeting the worlds current needs without
compromising the ability of future generations to do the same—is of growing importance
in times of rapid social transformations, global climate change, and economic uncertainty.
Negotiating the interchange and tradeoffs between preservation of cultural heritage and
environmental protection is the manifestation of sustainability, but it inherently produces
conflicts. Difficult decisions must be made at all levels, whether in having to privilege one type
of cultural heritage over another to minimize environmental impacts, or in allowing a part of
the museum collection to decline due to limited resources.
The panel discussion will convene representatives of various disciplines and discuss the
progress under various angles the pathways towards the “green museum” – a museum which
incorporates and implements the concept of sustainability in its program, its activities and
its physical presence. In particular, the panelists will address existing frameworks to identify,
evaluate and manage risks, benefits, requirements and impacts in order to define priorities and
propose solutions which decrease environmental and economic costs of preservation.
PANEL DISCUSSION
On the way to the Green
Museum: Managing risk and
sustainability
Chair: Stefan Simon 1
1 Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage (IPCH),
Yale University, P.O. Box 27395, West Haven, CT 06516-
7395, United States of America; stefan.simon@yale.edu
SPNHC 2016
SYMPOSIA AND PANEL DISCUSSIONS
SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts
62 63
ABSTRACT
Digital technologies are having a profound influence on how we manage, access and use
our collections. These services have the potential to generate efficiencies that will transform
traditional collection management and create opportunities to integrate our activities across
and beyond institutional boundaries.
In this session we invite speakers to present on the systems and technologies that will be
required to develop a common digitisation infrastructure across collections-based institutions.
Key topics
Data mobilisation - infrastructures aiding the digitisation of collections at scale.
Data aggregators & data portals - linking institutional data portals to common digital
gateways to enable semantic enrichment of our data
Next generation collection management systems, models & data services - moving
towards a service-driven architecture in collections management systems, the supporting
tools (e.g. API-based services, taxonomic name matching, checklist production, authority
files, georeferencing, forecasting and analytical tools) and required new and extended
data models
Data consensus - systems and standards for community data curation and attribution
ABSTRACT
Who are the future users of the digital network and how do we develop common priorities to
service these needs? From a purely economic standpoint, the simplest and cheapest way to
prioritize digitization is to use the A-Z approach, that is, start from one end of a collection
moving sequentially to the last end. With this approach there is little trouble tracking or
skipping, it is neutral and can be easily industrialised by using conveyer belt systems.
However, in the majority of situations, resources are scarce, sizes and the different kinds of
collections are overwhelming, research is ongoing, urgent and important questions need to
be answered hence the need to set digitization priorities based for example on taxonomy,
geography, habitats, research needs, preservation methods, societal needs, and so on. Priorities
may be set at the individual, institutional, local, regional, national or international levels, and
furthermore they need not be uniform so long as they are fit for purpose. Strategic prioritization
is essential in order to make the biggest impact on biodiversity science, policy, decisions, take
advantage of funding opportunities, and leverage the best partnerships. Despite the concerted
efforts and the deployment of significant resources in the last decade, it is estimated that
only about 10% of the world’s c. 3 billion natural history collection specimens (NHCs) have
been digitised with most of the efforts concentrated in North America and Western Europe.
Furthermore, only some of the digitised collections are fully mobilised in terms of being
findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable. Past, current and planned digitisation
projects that did not follow the A-Z approach and were not just opportunistic had to prioritise
what they digitise and can provide important lessons to the biocollections community. This
symposium aims to provide a roadmap for setting digitisation priorities.
Key topics
Prioritizing collections for digitization—which collections, what should come first,
and what is the progression, etc;
Effective, best practices;
Bridging the digitization gap between the developed and developing countries;
Potential partnerships;
Funding - how to pay for it.
SYMPOSIUM 2
Enabling infrastructure: Future
collections, data & informatics
Primary Organizer:
SYNTHESYS3
Chairs: Vince Smith and
Laurence Livermore 1
1 Diversity and Informatics, Natural History Museum,
London, SW7 5BD, UK;
vince@vsmith.info, l.livermore@nhm.ac.uk
SYMPOSIUM 3
Setting global and local
digitisation priorities
Primary Organizer: GBIF Task
Force on Accelerating the
Discovery of Biocollections Data
Chairs: Leonard Krishtalka 1
1 Biodiversity Institute, University of Kansas, Dyche Hall,
1345 Jayhawk Blvd, Lawrence, KS 66045, United States
of America; Krishtalka@ku.edu
SUMMARY
SYNTHESYS3, GBIF, CETAF, iDigBio, and others are working together to create this series of
symposia to foster a unified conversation at SPNHC 2016 directed at coordinating efforts to
realize global digitization and global data access for biological collections. The goals of these
integrated symposia are to discuss:
lessons learned so far, including new developments and data use examples;
strategies for worldwide access to the means to digitize collections data;
guidelines to aid prioritization of collections’ digitization and future collecting; and
the necessary human resources, hardware and software infrastructure for global creation of
and access to this much-needed data.
Abstracts of oral and poster presentations submitted to this series are included in abstract
section of this conference book under the name of the first author and referring to the
symposium they will be held.
ABSTRACT
Natural History Collection (NHC) data are being mobilized all over the world. A recent
preliminary worldwide survey data suggests the trend is growing. As digitization begins
to become an every-day part of collections, many compelling issues vie for attention. For
example, cost, prioritization, sustainability, and rates of digitization are four such issues. And,
many uses for NHC data are well-known and fairly well-understood. But issues exist with the
data, and there is still much legacy data to be digitally captured – before it can be shared with
the world’s researchers.
We invite presentations from anyone in the collections and biodiversity informatics community
who is involved in the mobilization and use of NHC data. We envision an assortment of talks
covering three areas:
1. digitization (including imaging) lessons learned and outstanding questions,
2. new and emerging technologies/models, and cross-discipline collaborations for
digitization and georeferencing, and
3. collections data-in-action.
Our speakers may be, for example, those doing the digitization and mobilization of the data;
museum collection administrators actively incorporating digitization into their museum’s
mission and vision; computer, information, and library scientists supporting digitization and
research efforts; education and outreach staff working with citizen scientists to digitize and
georeference; or those using collections data in research.
Key topics
Digitization Lessons Learned
New Technology, New Strategies
Collections Data-In-Action
LINKED SYMPOSIA
One Collection: pathways to
integration
SYMPOSIUM 1
An international conversation
on mobilizing natural history
collections data and integrating
data for research
Primary Organizer: Integrated
Digitized Biocollections
(iDigBio), SYNTHESYS3,
University of Oregon
Chairs: Deborah Paul
(iDigBio) 1; Elspeth Haston
(SYNTHESYS3) 2 and Brian
Westra (University of Oregon,
USA) 3
1 Institute for Digital Information, Florida State University
Tallahassee, Florida 32306, USA; dpaul@fsu.edu
2 Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH3 5LR,
UK; E.Haston@rbge.ac.uk
3 University of Oregon, Science Library, Eugene, 97408, US;
bwestra@uoregon.edu
SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts
64 65
ABSTRACT
DemoCamp provides a venue for creators to promote their technological solutions to advance
the field of museum curation with broad applications for biology and biodiversity informatics.
This is a popular and well-attended session at SPNHC and good participation is expected.
Computer demonstrations are welcomed in any technologies relevant to natural history
scientists, collections managers, or biodiversity information managers. Technologies
demonstrated may include, among other things, collections/ transaction management software,
geo-referencing web-based applications, and programs for analysis of data/ images. DemoCamp
presentations should feature some of the latest developments in currently available products/
software/ applications as well as ongoing research projects and prototypes. Live demonstrations
of these technologies will raise awareness of new (and improved) tools available for data
acquisition, documentation, and synthesis. Demonstrations will also provide a venue for
idea exchange and feedback from potential users. DemoCamp abstracts will appear in the
conference proceedings.
Abstracts of oral and poster presentations submitted to this symposium are included in
abstract section of this conference book under the name of the first author and referring to the
symposium.
DEMOCAMP
Organizer: Society for the
Preservation of Natural History
Collections (SPNHC)
Chairs: Jennifer Strotman 1
1 Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560, USA;
StrotmanJ@si.edu
ABSTRACT
The future of biological collections lies in greater integration and cooperation to develop as
a global Research Infrastructure (RI), with common practices, policy and systems. Achieving
this requires mechanisms that enable us to draw on successful workflows, technologies and
processes, and develop fair and efficient business models that ensure long-term sustainability
of infrastructure. Building on the work of ADBC programme (http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/
nsf15576/nsf15576.htm) and coordinating groups like iDigBio, alongside the work of
organisations and projects such as CETAF, GBIF, TDWG, NSCA and SYNTHESYS, this session
will bring together key stakeholders to coordinate actions relevant to the development of a
global RI on bio-collections.
At European level, the European Strategic Framework for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) sets
the top-level priorities for developing robust and sustainable RIs. Inclusion of bio-collections
in the ESFRI roadmap would place bio-collections at the heart of the European RIs, enhancing
physical and virtual access to collections, promoting large scale international collaborations
and opening up new opportunities for attracting funding from both national and regional public
and private sources.
This is a by-invitation Component of the Symposium. Conference attendees are invited to
contribute to the discussion part of the session.
Key topics
Established distributed Research Infrastructures: Lessons learned;
Bio-collections in Europe: ESFRI roadmap update preparatory activities;
Links to related regional initiatives (e.g. iDigBio, ENVRI+, LifeWatch, ELIXIR);
International collaboration between major programmes;
Sustainability and business models: What is available and what is possible?;
Training and capacity building programmes;
Wrap-up discussion: “How do we proceed?” - Action items.
ABSTRACT
Recent national and global digitization initiatives have led to a resurgence of interest in
natural history collections (NHCs), the data they contain, and the potential to use NHC data to
address large scale questions related to climate change, invasive species, and anthropogenic
disturbance. This influx of energy into NHCs, emerging databases, emphasis on big data
and data literacy, and the changing skill sets required to manage NHCs begs to examine
the training of the next generation of scientists. The Implementation Plan for the Network
Integrated Biocollections Alliance (USA) pointed to two emerging goals for the collections
community that relate directly to education: 1) enhancing the training of existing collections
staff and create the next generation of biodiversity information managers, and 2) infusing
specimen-based learning and exploration into formal and informal science education. With the
publication of Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology: A Call to Action, there has been
a renewed interest in creating authentic research experiences. The next generation of college
graduates needs to be competent in communication and collaboration, have quantitative
competency, and the ability to understand and interpret data. The future workforce of biologists
must be comfortable working with large databases. Specimens and data from NHCs can serve
a unique role in workforce training as NHC specimens are uniquely qualified to teach about the
iterative process of science, data literacy, quantitative biology, and biodiversity informatics.
This symposium invites presentations from small and large institutions on current museum-
based educational and workforce training initiatives, the development and sharing of novel
educational or training modules and resources, graduate and undergraduate internships and
courses focused on experiential learning in collections management and curation, and future
directions for natural history museum workforce development focused on students and early
career professionals.
Abstracts of oral and poster presentations submitted to this symposium are included in
abstract section of this conference book under the name of the first author and referring to the
symposium.
SYMPOSIUM 4
Developing a global research
infrastructure framework for
bio-collections
Primary Organizer:
SYNTHESYS3
Chairs: Dimitris Koureas
(SYNTHESYS3) 1 and Ana
Casino (CETAF) 2
1 Diversity and Informatics, Natural History Museum,
London, SW7 5BD, UK; d.koureas@nhm.ac.uk
2 Consortium of European Taxonomic Facilities,
1000 Brussels, BE; ana.casino@cetaf.org
IDIGBIO SYMPOSIUM
Small Collections Symposium:
Blending the educational
resources of small and large
collections for training the
next generation of museum
professionals
Organizer: Integrated Digitized
Biocollections (iDigBio), Small
Collections Network (SCNet)
Chairs: Anna Monfils 1 and Gil
Nelson 2
1 Central Michigan University, Biology, Mount Pleasant,
48859, USA; monfi1ak@cmich.edu
2 Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, 32306, USA;
gnelson@bio.fsu.edu
SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts
66 67
ABSTRACT. This dynamic and participatory workshop will foster broad perspectives and
creative thinking about managing risks and sustainability within collection holding institutions.
The goal is to understand the real value of environmental control for collection preservation
and to identify opportunities for improved preservation, reduced energy costs, or both
simultaneously. It is intended for both recent graduates and mid-career professionals in
positions ranging from technical assistance to senior management.
Time: June 25 and 26, 2016, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Venue: Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum
ABSTRACT. Photogrammetry is a powerful and relatively inexpensive tool for documentation
of the appearance and condition of specimens during any step of the curatorial process. The
purpose of this workshop is to familiarize participants with the methodology, applications,
and products of photogrammetry as it relates to collection, preparation and curation of
natural history collections. Also, costs and benefits of various typical scenarios for large-scale
collection digitizing will be discussed.
Time: June 25, 2016, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Venue: Museum für Naturkunde
ABSTRACT. In 2012 a project was established to develop baseline standards for fluid
preserved collections. This workshop will build on the findings of this project by comparing
different standards and techniques used or recommended for fluid collections. It will focus
on the development and understanding of terminology and the process, with particular
reference to the chemistry of wet collections, their fixation and preservation, and the control
of deterioration mechanisms. The workshop will combine theoretic concepts with practical
collection care and management issues.
Time: June 25, 2016, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Venue: Museum für Naturkunde
ABSTRACT. Selected examples of the largest German bird collection illustrate how badly
damaged but valuable exhibits can be preserved and saved. Apart from demonstrating the
working steps, repaired and restored exhibits of the Berlin bird collection will be presented and
different methods and experiences will be discussed. This three-hour workshop will take place
in the new preparation facility of the Museum für Naturkunde and will include a tour into the
bird collection. Participants will be provided with handouts including recipes, lists of materials,
providers and references.
Time: June 25, 2016, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Venue: Museum für Naturkunde
WORKSHOP 1
Museum environments:
managing risk and
sustainability
Presented by: Robert Waller
(Protect Heritage Corporation)
and Jeremy Linden (Image
Permanence Institute)
WORKSHOP 2
Cost-efficient large-scale
surface digitizing via
photogrammetry – approaches
for small and large collections
Presented by: Heinrich Mallison
(Museum für Naturkunde,
Leibniz Institute for Evolution
and Biodiversity Science,
Berlin, Germany)
WORKSHOP 3
Fluid collections – conservation
techniques
Presented by: Dirk Neumann
(The Bavarian State Collection
of Zoology, Munich, Germany)
and Julian Carter (Amgueddfa
Cymru - National Museum
Wales, Cardiff, Wales)
WORKSHOP 4
Cleaning – repairing – restoring
of historical mounted bird
specimens
Presented by: Jürgen Fiebig
(Museum für Naturkunde,
Leibniz Institute for Evolution
and Biodiversity Science,
Berlin, Germany)
SPNHC 2016
WORKSHOPS
SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts SPNHC 2016 – Abstracts
68 69
Originally intended as a tool against "biopiracy", Access and Benefit Sharing (ABS) has become
a reality over the past years for collection managers and researchers alike. In order to obtain
access to specimens in the field, legally binding agreements need to be signed in countries
with access legislation and these contracts stipulate the scope of all subsequent utilization
of the material collected. The agreements made under ABS need to be carefully observed
and have to remain traceable with the respective collection specimens. This workshop looks
into the nature of ABS and its origins, the Convention of Biological Diversity and the Nagoya
Protocol and provides practical advice for those, who work with specimens collected in
signatory countries after 2014.
Time: June 25, 2016, 1:30 PM – 4:30 PM
Venue: Museum für Naturkunde
ABSTRACT. Proper sealing of jars in fluid collections is crucial for long term prevention of
fluid loss and thus for long term preservation. In a hands on workshop, sealing techniques for
different jar types – including an innovative technique for twist off jars – will be presented and
participants will get first hand experience in all techniques demonstrated. Jars include twist
off jars (including a newly developed borosilicate version), ground glass stopper jars and jars
sealed with bees wax/collophonium or other sealing agents.
Time: June 25, 2016, 1:30 PM – 4:30 PM
Venue: Museum für Naturkunde
ABSTRACT. This workshop is jointly hosted by the EU-based SYNTHESYS3 project and the
US-based iDigBio project. It will be a mix of informative presentations, practical training and
open discussion with an aim to make these tools more accessible to institutes of all sizes.
Inselect currently supports automated recognition, cropping and annotation of scanned images
of items such as drawers of pinned insects and trays of microscope slides. ABBYY FineReader
is an OCR tool which has been found to perform well for specimens, enabling the automated
capture of specimen label data. Symbiota is a virtual platform which incorporates OCR, NLP
and crowdsourced transcription modules.
Time: June 25, 2016, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Venue: Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum
WORKSHOP 4
"Access and Benefit Sharing"
in Natural History Collections
– implementation and practical
management
Presented by: Jürgen Fiebig
(Museum für Naturkunde,
Leibniz Institute for Evolution
and Biodiversity Science,
Berlin, Germany)
WORKSHOP 6
Proper sealing in fluid
collections
Presented by: Klaus Wechsler
(Bremen, Germany) and
Christoph Meier (formerly
Naturhistorisches Museum
Basel, Switzerland)
WORKSHOP 7
Synthesys-iDigBio: Digitisation
Software Training Workshop:
Inselect, Symbiota & ABBYY
FineReader
Presented by: Elspeth Haston
(Synthesys3, Royal Botanic
Garden Edinburgh, UK),
Deborah Paul (iDigBio, Florida
State University, Tallahassee,
Florida, USA)
SPNHC 2016 – Oral and poster presentations, sorted alphabetically by first author SPNHC 2016 – Oral and poster presentations, sorted alphabetically by first author
70 71
SPNHC 2016
ORAL AND POSTER PRESENTATIONS
SPNHC 2016 – Oral and poster presentations, sorted alphabetically by first author SPNHC 2016 – Oral and poster presentations, sorted alphabetically by first author
72 73
REFERENCES
Abarenkov K, L. Tedersoo, R. H. Nilsson, K. Vellak, I.-Saar, V. Veldre, E. Parmasto, M. Prous, A.. Aan, M. Ots, O. Kurina,
I. Ostonen, J. Jõgeva, S. Halapuu, K. Põldmaa, M. Toots, J. Truu, K.-H. Larsson, & U. Kõljalg. 2010. PlutoF - a Web
Based Workbench for Ecological and Taxonomic Research, with an Online Implementation for Fungal ITS Sequences.
Evolutionary Bioinformatics 6:189-196.
Kõljalg U, R. H. Nilsson, K. Abarenkov, L. Tedersoo, A.. F. S. Taylor, M. Bahram, S. T. Bates, T. D. Bruns, J. Bengtsson-
Palme, T. M. Callaghan, B. Douglas, T. Drenkhan, U. Eberhardt, M. Dueñas, T. Grebenc, G. W. Griffith, M. Hartmann, P. M.
Kirk, P. Kohout, E. Larsson, B. D. Lindahl, R. Lücking, M. P. Martín, P. B. Matheny, N. H. Nguyen, T. Niskanen, J. Oja, K.
G. Peay, U. Peintner, M. Peterson, K. Põldmaa, L. Saag, I. Saar, A. Schüßler, J. A. Scott, C. Senés, M. E. Smith, A. Suija,
D. L. Taylor, M. T. Telleria, M. Weiß, & K.-H.Larsson 2013. Towards a unified paradigm for sequence-based identification
of Fungi. Molecular Ecology 22(21): 5271-5277.
Kõjalg U, K.-H.Larsson, K. Abarenkov, R. H. Nilsson, I. J. Alexander, U. Eberhardt, S. Erland, K. Høiland, R. Kjøller, E.
Larsson, T- Pennanen, R. Sen, A. F. S. Taylor, L. Tedersoo, T. Vrålstad & B. M. Ursing. 2005. UNITE: a database providing
web-based methods for the molecular identification of ectomycorrhizal fungi. New Phytologist 166: 1063-1068.
Nilsson RH, C. Wurzbacher, M. Bahram, V. R. M. Coimbra, E. Larsson, L. Tedersoo, J. Eriksson, C. D. Ritter, S.
Svantesson, M. Sánchez-Garzřa, M. Ryberg, E. Kristiansson & K. Abarenkov. 2016. Top 50 most wanted fungi. MycoKeys
12: 29-40.
Figure 1. Data entities and services on PlutoF platform.
ABSTRACT. PlutoF platform (https://plutof.ut.ee) provides online services to create, manage,
analyse and publish biology-related databases and projects. Platform users include natural
history collections, international, regional or institutional workgroups developing common
databases, individual researchers and students, as well as Citizen Scientists. PlutoF brings
together, into a single online workbench, datasets that are usually spread over different
solutions and therefore difficult to access or work with. Our system allows to manage most
of biology-related data like specimens and other taxon occurrences, DNA sequences, traits,
locality, habitat, projects, agents, etc. in one place. Sharing, exporting and importing, and
publishing your data is easy and logical. There are plenty of options to publish datasets as
Open Data – data can be displayed in any portal via API connection, Digital Object Identifiers
can be requested internally, data can be released to GBIF (http://www.gbif.org/), etc. There are
currently over 2,000 registered users from 75 countries.
MAIN TEXT. The main concept behind PlutoF is to provide services where the entire data life
cycle can be managed online and on one workbench. The very first version of the PlutoF was
built in 2001-2002 for the specimen and associated DNA sequence datasets. These first
datasets were released publicly by the UNITE community in 2003 as an online DNA sequence
key for the fungi (Kõljalg et al. 2005; https://unite.ut.ee). Since then the system has been
expanded and new data types have been added to the platform. Soon after the first version was
developed, natural history collections started to exploit PlutoF for their institutional databases
and transactions. Early users also included ecologists, taxonomists and Citizen Scientists by
bringing different datasets into the system. The first online PlutoF workbench was released in
2005 (Abarenkov et al. 2010).
The current version of PlutoF incorporated several modules (Fig. 1) which allow to create and
manage databases across disciplines. Specimen data in collection databases are available for
external annotations with DNA sequences, new identifications, traits, multimedia, references,
etc. Data can flow vice versa when databased specimen of a specific study is lodged in the
collection. Only ownership and location of the specimen must be updated. The same applies
to environmental samples. There are projects which develop databases of taxon occurrences
covering different Kingdoms, their interactions and traits.
PlutoF provides specific tools for third-party annotations of different datasets from external
databases. One such example includes developing regional reference based taxon checklists
where taxon occurrences from published literature can be complemented with diverse
geographical and ecological information. The UNITE community is using these tools to
annotate and improve the quality of fungal ITS sequences in International Nucleotide
Sequence Databases (INSD: GenBank, ENA, DDBJ). The local copy of INSD dataset is updated
on a regular basis. Any third-party annotation added to the INSD dataset (e.g. locality, habitat,
source, traits, taxon identifications, and interacting taxa) is made publicly available to the
research community through web services and on UNITE homepage (Nilsson et al. 2016).
Other PlutoF communities and users may start their own projects where external datasets are
imported and annotated.
There are specific modules on the workbench to help users with importing their data from CSV
files, exporting in various formats (e.g. CSV, JSON, PDF for specimen labels, FASTA for DNA
sequences), and displaying data on the maps.
PlutoF supports Open Data and data publishing in various ways – support for Digital Object
Identifiers is provided by direct link to DataCite (https://www.datacite.org), publishing to GBIF
can be set up on demand, and publishing in Pensoft journals (http://www.pensoft.net/) is made
easy through import options in ARPHA writing tool (http://arpha.pensoft.net/) and automated
creation of Ecological Metadata Language (EML) formatted metadata for datasets.
The PlutoF platform is built using the following web technologies – Django REST Framework
(DRF), Ember.js. Database management system involves PostgreSQL+PostGIS. Public RESTful
web services are provided by DRF, the software packages of the analysis module are written on
Perl and Python languages.
ORAL PRESENTATION
DemoCamp
PlutoF – online solution for
the common biological data
management and Open Data
Kessy Abarenkov* 1
Urmas Kõljalg1, 2,
Allan Zirk1,
& Veljo Runnel1
1 Natural History Museum,
University of Tartu, Vanemuise 46,
Tartu 51014, Estonia
2 Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences,
University of Tartu, Lai 40,
Tartu 51005, Estonia
* kessy.abarenkov@ut.ee
A
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74 75
Two collections, the Quaternary Plant Macrofossil Collection and the rough-cut coal ball
collection, pose particular curation challenges. These are the subject of more in-depth
projects, supported through University of Iowa Center for Research by Undergraduates (ICRU)
Fellowships.
The Quaternary Plant Macrofossil Collection consists of multiple specimens housed in glass
vials according to species, organized by site. Individual specimens are not cited in publications
and reports, but species are reported as present in floral lists. Should these specimens be
considered as cited specimens? Many vials are crowded into boxes or gathered together with
tape. Specimens are stored in ordinary stationery envelopes, and in open trays and glass
dishes. Specimen vials are labeled with cryptic shorthand information. The coal ball collection
poses different challenges. The collection consists of rough cut coal balls from multiple coal
mines. Precise specimen provenance is unknown. Is there a way to determine the provenance
of the coal balls? Prior to acquisition, coal balls were cut in different orientations and peels
were made from some sections. Coal balls were not marked in any way to signify which coal
ball pieces and peels are associated. This creates a challenge for cataloguing, although some
peels were still attached or loosely wrapped around the coal ball. The preservation of peels, and
the prevention of pyrite decay in the coal balls is a challenge. What is the best way to preserve
these collections? What is the best way to digitize these collections?
DISCUSSION & CONCLUSIONS. Maja Stina Sunleaf is working with Dr. Richard G. Baker
to curate the Quaternary Plant Macrofossil Collection, moving the collection to new storage,
preserving the original organization and associations. After curation assessment, and
prioritizing of curation requirements, temporary labeling was applied and all the associated
publications and reports were located. A basic inventory was compiled of all the localities
represented in each drawer, and all associated publications. Vials were reorganized for
improved handling and preservation. Trays were lined with Plastozote foam to secure vials and
prevent their falling over, moving around, or becoming separated. Each vial was located in a
specific hole in the foam with a specimen number (unique to each vial) marked on the foam
for quick audit and inventory. Soil samples stored at the off-site collections facility will be
cross-referenced with the collection. A photographic collection that serves as a reference for Dr.
Baker‘s plant identifications will be digitized and made available on-line.
Kaitlin Schlotfelt is curating the coal ball collection, organizing specimens and creating
temporary labels for coal ball pieces, re-associating pieces where possible and separating the
peels, which are cross-referenced before being rehoused in acid-free envelopes. An inventory
of every coal ball piece assigns a temporary number based on what drawer it was in, to
preserve any accidental or fortuitous associations. An initial curation assessment provides a
benchmark for curation progress. Several specimens show signs of pyrite decay due to high
relative humidity. All coal balls will be monitored for decay in the new storage and a condition
report completed for each drawer. A photo will be taken of each drawer with close-ups of any
existing decay. Specimens will be checked regularly and the environment in the room and the
cabinet monitored with a PEM and eClimateNotebook. If any change is detected, low relative
humidity or oxygen-free microenvironments will be created for at-risk specimens. In addition
to developing a standard for cataloguing each associated coal ball piece and related peels,
techniques and procedures for digitizing the material will be investigated. We will investigate
whether a geochemical fingerprint can be detected that will determine provenance.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. Support for this project is provided by a National Science Foundation
grant DBI-1348322 (2 yrs., 5/01/14-4/30/16, $196,751); “CSBR: Natural History Collections:
Critical renovation and revitalization of the University of Iowa Fossil Plant Collection” (PI =
A. F. Budd, Co-PIs = T. S. Adrain, H. J. Sims, J. M. Adrain), the University of Iowa Center for
Research by Undergraduates, UI Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, and the UI
Mary Louise Kelley Professional Development Award.
REFERENCES
Adrain, T. S., D. N. Lewis and M. M. Horton. 2006. Improving curation standards in paleontology collections through the
application of “McGinley Levels.” Collection Forum 21(1-2): 19-32.
Figure 1. Vials of Quaternary plant macrofossils secured in
foam in new housing.
ABSTRACT. Established in 1857, the Michigan State University (MSU) Museum houses
over 111,000 vertebrate specimens dating from 1844. Over the past 26 years, the MSU
Museum has successfully completed 11 grant-funded re-housing projects for both wet and dry
vertebrate specimens. In October 2014, the MSU Museum received two-years of funding from
the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services to improve safety, environmental conditions,
and accessibility of more than 28,500 vertebrate specimens, including egg sets and nests that
had been stored in substandard wooden cupboards or other inappropriate housing. Many of
the specimens lacked a protective box. The eggs and nests were at risk of damage or loss from
crowding, exposure to ultraviolet and visible light as well as contaminants such as dust and
acid migration from wooden furniture and shelves. To date, 439 egg sets and nests have been
re-housed into new cabinets with archival boxes and storage materials. Styles of boxes included
tan board clear-view window boxes and clear polyester boxes with metal edge construction. Box
height extenders were constructed from 100% cotton blotter paper and installed in the corners
of the box bottoms (where needed). MSU undergraduate students assisted with all aspects of
this re-housing project.
ABSTRACT. In 2014, the University of Iowa Paleontology Repository received a grant from the
National Science Foundation to rehouse and curate a fossil plant collection acquired in 2001.
This collection, of over 20,000 specimen lots, includes two collections that require more
specialized curation than the regular “hand” fossil specimens. These are the Quaternary Plant
Macrofossil Collection and the Coal Ball Collection. The Quaternary plant collection contains
hundreds of vials of samples, some separated into species, from many localities in the US
Midwest, the focus of over 26 scientific publications. The coal ball collection contains rough
cut coal balls in multiple orientations, with associated coal ball peels. There is no locality
data for these coal balls and pieces from individual coal balls are disassociated. Some coal
balls are at risk from pyrite decay. Both collections pose challenges in storage, documentation
and digitization. Two Museum Studies undergraduate students are curating the collections,
supported by Iowa Center for Research by Undergraduates Fellowships. Their tasks involve
collection assessments, inventory, documentation, rehousing, organizing, compiling data,
cataloguing, preservation and digitization.
INTRODUCTION & METHODS. In 2001, the University of Iowa Paleontology Repository (UIPR)
received a collection of fossil plants (>20,000 specimen lots) from the Department of Biology.
At short notice, specimens were transfered to a room in a building adjacent to the UIPR, into
old wooden and metal cabinets salvaged from a recent storage upgrade. The material included
a substantial collection of compression fossils from the Pennsylvanian of the Midwest USA,
historic collections of cycadeoid fossils and coal balls, a comprehensive teaching collection,
representative collections of Cenozoic paleobotany, and 400 microscope slide boxes of modern
cleared leaves. The collection complemented the UIPR‘s existing paleobotany collection of
Cretaceous leaves from Kansas collected in the late 1800s by Charles H. Sternberg, Mazon
Creek nodules and Pennsylvanian floras collected by F. O. Thompson, a large slide collection
of Pennsylvanian spores, and an active Quaternary plant macrofossil research collection.
Unfortunately, the emergency facilities were not appropriate for the newly acquired collections,
neither in terms of environment, nor pest control, and damage in the form of pyrite decay and
label destruction by cockroaches justified new cabinets to house the collection more securely.
A major project to renovate and reinvigorate the paleobotany collection, funded by the National
Science Foundation (NSF), has been underway since Fall 2014.
RESULTS. Under the NSF-funded project, all paleobotany collections were brought together
in newly assigned space and rehoused in new museum-grade cabinets. Undergraduate student
assistants each selected a collection sub-unit to curate, re-boxing, organizing and inventorying
specimens and preserving labels. Collection assessments (Adrain et al. 2006) were made at
the beginning and end of the projects to document curation progress, and to allow students to
see how their work contributed to the ongoing process of curation.
POSTER
Preventive conservation and
material science
Re-housing bird eggs and
nests at the Michigan State
University Museum
Laura Abraczinskas* 1
Barbara Lundrigan1, 2
1 Michigan State University Museum, East Lansing,
Michigan 48824, USA
2 Michigan State University, Department of Integrative
Biology, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA
* abraczi1@msu.edu
POSTER
Preventive conservation and
material science
Challenges in curating two
fossil plant collections at the
University of Iowa Paleontology
Repository
Tiffany S. Adrain* 1
Maja Stina Sunleaf1
Kaitlin Schlotfelt1
1 University of Iowa, Department of Earth and Environmental
Sciences, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.
* tiffany-adrain@uiowa.edu
A
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FROM DUSTY COLLECTIONS TO A RESEARCH FACILITY. Prior to its transfer to the MNH,
Jarmin and Lawas (1992) conducted their undergraduate study which focused on reviewing
and updating the identification of the bird specimens based on the listing in the museum
catalogue; however were unable to examine the actual specimens. This work highlighted the
extent of the collections in terms of documenting a wide array of vertebrate taxa as museum
specimens as reflected in the documentation.
Housed in an inappropriate room for museum specimens, it was a struggle for the
MNH to maintain such a large collection. But it continues to survive despite the lack
of resources. Aside from the Rabor collection, the Museum also maintains some of the
largest collections in entomology, botany, mycology, zoology and microbial cultures in
the country.
Through the years, the Rabor Collection has been recognized as a significant source
of information for taxonomic studies. Local and foreign researchers often visit the
collection for their research projects. In the University, these specimens serve as
teaching materials for courses in taxonomy (Ornithology, Mammalogy) and ecology. Its
importance is further highlighted when the Philippine Congress issued the Republic
Act 9147 or the Wildlife Act of 2001 implementing policies on collecting of wildlife
species in the Philippines. The Rabor Collection serves as a supplement to study the
species that the law forbids to collect from the wild.
For the past years, several students have utilized these specimens for their thesis and
research. In 2010, Tobias et al. devised criteria for determining species limits among
birds using a combination of morphological and ecological information. For example,
Fortela (2014) studied the species limits of Philippine Malkohas (Cuculiformes:
Cuculidae) using the specimens of the Rabor Collection and those deposited in other
museums in the Philippines and abroad. Salces and Pantua (2015) applied the same
criteria to delimit several species of Philippine birds.
Museum collections are also important references for studying host-parasite
relationships. Several mallophagan lice were collected by Fabrigas (2015) from
hornbill specimens in the Rabor Collection. Some of them were new species despite of
being preserved with their hosts for decades.
In the advent of modern technologies and techniques in molecular biology, historical
DNA can be isolated from museum specimens. In regard to the Rabor Collection, this
was proven by Gonzalez (2013) who isolated historical DNA from hornbills to study
their phylogeny and evolution.
To date, the Museum is taking a big step forward to ensure that the Rabor Collection
together with all the other repositories will continue to live not just as preserved
specimens but as significant resources for the scientific community. There is a need to
uphold research collections in museums as part of a rich heritage of the country.
REFERENCES
Calapit, M.C. 1994. The Man Behind the Rabor Wildlife Museum. Los Banos Times 14(1): 8.
Dickinson, E.C. R.S. Kennedy and K.C. Parkes. 1991. The Birds of the Philippines. British Ornithological Union. 507pp.
Du Pont, J.E. 1971. Philippine Birds. Delaware Museum of Natural History, USA. 480pp.
Fabrigas, N.P. 2015. Mallophaga (Phthiraptera: Amblycera, Ischnocera) of Philippine Hornbills (Bucerotiformes:
Bucerotidae) from the Philippine National Museum and UPLB Museum of Natural History. Undergraduate thesis available
at UPLB Library.
Fortela, E.B. 2014. Species limits and biogeography of Philippine Malkohas (Cuculiformes: Cuculidae) from Greater Luzon
and Palawan Faunal Regions. Undergraduate thesis available at UPLB Library.
Jarmin, MJ and M. Lawas. 1992. A Supplement of the bird catalogue of the Dioscoro S. Rabor Wildlife Museum.
Unpublished manuscript available at the UPLB Museum of Natural; History Library.
Pantua, K.V. Species limits in purple-throated sunbirds (Leptocoma sperata), Buzzing flowerpeckers (Dicaeum
hypoleucum) and Philippine trogons (Harpactes ardens). Undergraduate thesis available at UPLB Library.
Salces, M.Y.J. 2015. Species limits in two widespread endemic Philippine birds, Elegant Tit (Periparus elegans) and
Sulphur-bellied Nuthatch (Sitta oenochlamys). Undergraduate thesis available at UPLB Library.
Taxa Philippines Rabor
Collection
%
Order 19 19 100
Family 77 63 88
Genera 247 195 79
Species
Total Number 556 233 42
Endemic 169 147 87
Resident 380 162 43
Migratory 171 51 30
Subspecies
Total Number 1019 592 58
Endemic 708 362 51
Taxa Philippines Rabor
Collection
%
Order 9 7 78
Family 26 20 77
Genera
Total Number 85 51 60
Species 22 9 41
Species
Total Number 183 68 37
Endemic 111 34 31
Common 65 28 43
Introduced 7 6 86
Table 1. Comparison of bird species present in the Philippines and the specimens
present at the Rabor Collection
Table 2. Comparison of mammal species present in the Philippines and the
specimens present at the Rabor Collection
ABSTRACT. Dr. Dioscoro S. Rabor is considered as the Father of Philippine Wildlife because
of his incomparable contribution to knowledge and understanding of Philippine biodiversity.
During his more than 20 years of field research, he led as much as 50 biodiversity expeditions
involving the major Philippine islands. From this fieldwork, he was able to collect more than
60,000 specimens, which were deposited in various museums in the Philippines and the
USA. In the Philippines, a large portion, consisting of more than 10,000 bird and 4,300
mammal specimens, are deposited at the UPLB Museum of Natural History. These specimens
are significant material for taxonomic and ecological studies. Some specimens are used as
teaching material in Wildlife Biology classes. Several researchers and students have utilized
the specimens in identifying species limits in birds. With the advent of technologies in
molecular biology, museum specimens are also significant sources of historical DNA for
sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. This is extremely important for resolving taxonomic
issues on threatened or rare species since collecting of these species is highly restricted by
law. The Museum continues to uphold these collections to complement current efforts in
understanding and conserving the rich biological diversity of the Philippines.
. There are only a few museums and university-based repositories in the country that harbor
extensive natural history collections such as the Philippine National Museum, University of
the Philippines (UP) Diliman Institute of Biology, Ateneo de Manila University and University
of Sto. Tomas in Manila; the University of the Philippines in Los Baños; Silliman University,
Visayas State University, University of San Carlos-Talamban in Visayas; and Mindanao State
University (MSU)-Marawi and MSU-Iligan Institute of Technology in the southern Philippines.
Among these museums, the UPLB Museum of Natural History (MNH) holds some of the largest
collections of biological specimens known in the country and possibly in Southeast Asia. This
includes the renowned wildlife collection of the late Dr. Dioscoro S. Rabor, recognized as the
Father of Philippine Wildlife Conservation.
The Rabor Wildlife Collection is recognized worldwide as one of the most valuable of its
kind. Its contributions and significance cannot be overlooked since the specimens are still
continuously used by vertebrate systematists and taxonomists. It is considered as the most
complete repository of Philippine land vertebrates representing most of the taxa known to occur
in the country (Tables 1 and 2).
From his collections, Rabor was able to describe more than 50 new species and subspecies
of land vertebrates. Even three decades after his collection, new species continue to be
discovered from his collections. Experts on Philippine fauna have widely used the specimens
from the Rabor Collection in their studies. To name a few of them, Eulethere du Pont (birds),
Robert Kennedy (birds), Lawrence Heaney (mammals) and Walter Brown (amphibians and
reptiles) established their names in the scientific world based on their work on Rabor’s
collection. In recognition of and tribute to his significant contribution, five species and four
subspecies were named after D.S. Rabor.
In 1975, he donated several of his specimens to the UPLB College of Forestry for a display
for local and foreign visitors of UPLB and as study specimens for several zoology and wildlife
courses. But the collection was neglected and poorly maintained which led to its slow
deterioration (Capalit, 1994). The absence of qualified museum personnel and the lack of
funds further aggravated the over-all conditions of the collection. Several specimens were also
used for display at the Makiling Botanic Gardens.
In September 1993, more than 18,000 specimens were transferred to the UPLB Museum
of Natural History. The MNH was first mandated to document the rich biological diversity of
Mt. Makiling and later on of the whole country. Since the transfer of the Rabor collections,
the MNH strived to maintain the collection from the meager funds that it receives from the
University. With the assistance of the curators, a room was designated to house the specimens.
ORAL PRESENTATION
Collections for the future –
future of collections
Rabor Wildlife Collection:
Today’s record for
understanding remarkable
biodiversity of the Philippine
islands
James DV. Alvarez* 1
Juan Carlos T. Gonzalez1,
Phillip A. Alviola1
Andres Tomas L. Dans1
Edison A. Cosico1
Florante A. Cruz1
1 Museum of Natural History, University of the Philippines
Los Baños, College, Laguna 4031, Philippine
* mnhuplb@gmail.com
A
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78 79
Society membership also included Colonel John Colvin of the Bengal Engineers and John
Rocke. Colvin and his brother-in-law Major Baker donated a substantial collection of specimens
and casts of fauna including Sivatherium, from the Siwalik Hills (Baker, 1850). Rocke, father-
in-law to Rev T.T. Lewis’ daughter, formed a systematic collection of birds, including a Great
Auk. He also wrote “Birds of Shropshire” (Rocke, 1865a, b).
Important 20th century collections. A century later research again became focussed on the
geological stratigraphy. A group of academics founded the Ludlow Research Group (LRG)
to refine the research undertaken by Murchison, in particular recognising the influences of
environment and evolution. Commencing in 1951, by the end of the 1970s the LRG had
enabled significant growth of the collection (Rosenbaum, 2008). Much of the collecting was
undertaken by the late John Norton, curator of the SMRC and honorary member of
the LRG. Then, in 1986, the Condover mammoths were discovered in a kettle hole
within fluvioglacial deposits just south of the county town of Shrewsbury; these are
the youngest mammoth specimens known from the UK and Western Europe. (Coope,
1988, Lister, 2009).
IMPLEMENTING THE FOSSILS IN SHROPSHIRE FISH PROJECT. From 2008, with
the current wave of austerity, cuts to local government funding have hit regional British
museums hard especially since 2012. The resultant loss of specialist collections staff
has reduced the ability of museums to provide informed access to collections. The
Friends of Ludlow Museum therefore sought funding to digitise this important regional
geological collection. The principal aim has been to secure virtual access that can
be delivered over the long term even if physical access is restricted. The funding was
secured from central Government under a project title of FISH (Fossils In Shropshire).
However, all aspects of the collection are to be digitally captured, not only the fossils
but also the rocks and minerals and the supporting literature (books, journals, theses
and maps.
The consultant team commenced with a review of the collections in order to define
a project plan. With limited funds and a time scale of no more than three years, this
exercise has allowed the team to prioritise those parts of the collections for priority
digitisation and identify where further expertise is required to support the process.
The development of long-term access will be based on the existing database protocols
provided by Orange Leaf on behalf of Shropshire Council. The public interface is
provided by the Discovering Shropshire History web site which is driven by the AdLib
collections database used by Shropshire Museum Service. Access by the scientific
community is facilitated by sharing this database with the national GB3D type fossils
database hosted by the British Geological Survey and contributed to by a consortium
of regionally important museums as well as the Natural History Museum.
In order to broaden accessibility to the information, the FISH consultants are working
in partnership with John Sear, a games designer specialising in interactive installations.
This is providing mentoring support to ensure that the images are of sufficient quality
and accompanied by accessible textual descriptions. This has enabled the team to think
imaginatively and avoid inadvertently limiting accessibility and usage of the digital information.
With the project at an early stage, the exact nature of the digital output from this partnership is
still emerging but based track record; it should be both interactive and magical.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. Funding for the FISH project was awarded to The Friends of Ludlow
Museum by the Libor fund held by the Treasury of HM Government. The funds are administered
through the Natural History Museum London. The digital mentoring scheme is funded by Arts
Council England via West Midlands Museum Development.
Figure 2. Rhinoceros lower jaw, Siwalik Hills. From the Colvin and Baker
Collection (Collection Number G.03402)
Figure 1. Exterior view of the Shropshire Museum Resource Centre
ABSTRACT. Developing sustainable practices is always a challenge, but no more so than
working in an old building, with aging environmental systems and old storage methods. New,
creative approaches are needed. Teams with open idea exchanges need to be developed and
their new ideas tested. In 2015 the Carnegie Museum of Natural History embarked on two
major grant-funded collection storage improvement projects. The first project, funded by the
Institute for Museum and Library Services, addresses storage and environmental concerns for
the holotype specimens in the Vertebrate Paleontology collections. Goals of the second project,
funded through National Endowment for the Humanities, are to improve storage, environment
and accessibility of the archaeology collection. Both projects use similar methods: new storage
cabinets, microclimates, improved storage mounts, as well as close collaboration with the
facilities and operations departments to achieve improved sustainability.
The ultimate goal is to better protect the collection, while making it more accessible and with
improved environmental conditions at a lower cost. We are now about half-way through both
projects.
This poster highlights initial improvements, some results were anticipated and others
unexpected.
ABSTRACT. The Friends of Ludlow Museum secured funding during 2015 for the FISH project
(Fossils In Shropshire) to digitise parts of the 41,500 specimens that form the Shropshire
county geological collection held at the ShropshireMuseum Resource Centre. This collection
was started in 1833 by the Ludlow Natural History Society; in addition to being one of the
oldest established museums in the region, the geology collection is also the second largest in
the West Midlands region of the UK. The collection is richest in Lower Palaeozoic invertebrates
and early fish but also contains some surprises such as Tertiary fauna from the Siwalik Hills
of the outer Himalayas. The consultant team were appointed in March 2016 and commenced
with a collection familiarisation exercise in order to plan the digitisation approach in detail.
Raising awareness of and releasing the potential of the collection through creating high
quality digital images is the principal desired outcome of the project for the Friends of Ludlow
Museum. Additional funding has enabled the consultant team to work in partnership with John
Sears, a game designer specialising in interactive installations for public spaces, so that the
project can develop and deliver an experimental, collaborative game-like output.
INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND. Shropshire Museum Resource Centre (SMRC), located
in the medieval town of Ludlow, houses the collections of the county Museum Service. The
collection was started in 1833 by the Ludlow Natural History Society, a small group of amateur
naturalists living in south Shropshire and north Herefordshire (Lloyd, 1983). The collections
of Shrewsbury Museum, which had been similarly founded in 1836, were transferred to the
SMRC from 2014 onwards, but are not yet fully assimilated.
The Friends of Ludlow Museum were established in 1968, to support the SMRC through
volunteer work and fund raising. This support was instrumental in building the current
collections facility, the SMRC. The SMRC, opened by H.M The Queen in 2003, is a flagship
structure for the curation of collections, and was designed to minimize risks from the ten
agents of decay (Waller, 1994; Andrew, 2006).
Material from the collections is on exhibition at a number of venues including the Music Hall
Museum, Shrewsbury, opened in 2015.
Historic connections. Ludlow Natural History Society members included the Rev T.T. Lewis
and Dr T. Lloyd who demonstrated to Murchison the sequence of zone fossils in what is now
known as the Ludlow Series of the Silurian System, enabling Murchison’s breakthrough in
understanding the stratigraphy (Murchison, 1839; Sinclair & Fenn, 1999).
POSTER
Green museum – How to
practice what we preach?
(General session)
Making sustainability work
Gretchen Anderson* 1
Amy Covell-Murthy1, 2,
Deborah Harding1, 2
Amy Henrici1, 3
1 Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Conservation,
Pittsburgh, 15213, USA
2 Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Anthropology,
Pittsburgh, 15213, USA
3 Carnegie Museum of Natural History,
Vertebrate Paleontology, Pittsburgh, 15213, USA
* AndersonG@CarnegieMNH.Org
ORAL PRESENTATION
Digitization and imaging
collections: new methods,
ideas, and uses
Releasing the potential of a
significant regional geology
collection through digitisation
and working with partners that
include an experimental game
designer
Kate Andrew* 1
Daniel Lockett2
Jackie Tweddle2
Michael Rosenbaum3
1 Kate Andrew, 59 The Common, Abberley, WR6 7AY,
Worcester, UK
2 Shropshire Museum Resource Centre, 9 Parkway, Ludlow,
Shropshire, SY8 2PG, UK
3 Friends of Ludlow Museum; C/O Shropshire Museum
Resource Centre, 9 Parkway, Ludlow, Shropshire,
SY8 2PG, UK
* geologicalkandrew@gmail.com
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80 81
INTRODUCTION & METHODS. The digitisation of data associated with natural history
collections is a huge task impossible to achieve in the short term only with the ordinary
resources of museums. Since the early nineties, the tasks associated to digitisation of the
natural history collections documentation have gone through three steps, whose characteristics
are summarized in Table 1. We have not found any literature comparing, in this context,
effectiveness and accuracy between crowdsourcing and in-situ methods using images. We aim
to find answers, based on experimental data from two partners of the SYNTHESYS3 project.
This preliminary analysis compares digitisation of ornithological register by crowdsourcing (The
Natural History Museum, London, NHM), to digitisation of fossil collections performed in-situ
with digital images (Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid, MNCN-CSIC). These data
are not entirely comparable, but have allowed us to draw some preliminary conclusions. Table 2
shows fields in each dataset.
Table 3 shows number of users and rows (records) transcribed by all type of in-situ and
crowdsourcing users, and period of time (months) employed. In MNCN-CSIC 14,377 records
were obtained by temporary staff and students. In NHM 328,135 records were obtained by
registered and anonym-users. One of the users, here named SuperUser, transcribed a 71% of
the rows, modifying the actual result. As this type of user is a deviation that must be rejected
from the analysis of overall outcome, the number of useful digitised records was then 93,692.
The SuperUser work was analysed apart.
In the context of this analysis, we used the word “effectiveness” to refer efficiency of
transcriptions per time unit. To compare effectiveness between methods we quantified the
number of records transcribed per month by the several types of collaborators. Accuracy refers
here to the correct completion of tasks, according to explicit or implicit criteria defined by the
requester. Evaluating accuracy is a way to evaluate quality or fitness for use. Kulkarni et al.
(2012) identified three types of problems why systems may provide inaccurate outcomes:
- Human error problem: this error has been calculated to identifier fields in both datasets.
“Error” means here that data are missing or incomplete, so it was impossible to locate the
original source.
- Task specification problem: workers are properly motivated to do a task correctly, but the
task may be unclear. Problems related with gaps in the guidelines were detected.
- Incentive problem: online workers may not want to do what they are being asked to do, due
to lack of motivation. Incentive problem can be quantified in the NHM data set, by the rate
of empty records in the downloaded file, users went into the platform and then they
decided not to transcribe records. MNCN collaborators had no incentive problem, as
defined here because they were hired to do that task.
RESULTS. The results of the analysis are shown in Table 4.
Table 3. Number of users and rows (records) transcribed, and period of time
(months) employed by all type of in-situ and crowdsourcing users.
Table 4. Comparative data of records/month, errors and empty records rate, by all
type of in-situ and crowdsourcing users.
REFERENCES
Andrew, K.J. 2006. Minimizing the risks from the ten agents of deterioration at two new West Midlands Museum Resource
Centres, UK. Collections Forum 2006 21:1-2.
Baker, W.E. 1850. Of the Fossil Remains presented by Himself and Colonel Colvin C.B. to the Museum of Natural History
at Ludlow. Published by E.J. Partridge, Ludlow.
Coope, R. 1988. The Condover Mammoths. Proceedings of the Shropshire Geological Society 7:20-21.
Lister, A. 2009. Late-glacial mammoth skeletons (Mammuthus primigenius) from Condover (Shropshire, UK): anatomy,
pathology, taphonomy and chronological significance. Geological Journal 44(4):447-479.
Lloyd, D.J. 1983. The history of Ludlow Museum (1833-1983). Ludlow Historical Research Group
Murchison, R.I. 1839. The Silurian System founded on geological researches in the counties of Salop, Hereford, Radnor,
Montgomery, Caermarthen, Brecon, Pembroke, Monmouth, Gloucester, Worcester, and Stafford: with descriptions of the
coal-fields and overlying formations. John Murray, Albermarle Street, London.
Rocke, J. 1865a. Birds of Shropshire. The Zoologist 23:9683-9688.
Rocke, J. 1865b. Birds of Shropshire. The Zoologist 24:76-84, 161-166.
Rosenbaum, M.S. 2008. The future for geology in the Marches. Proceedings of the Shropshire Geological Society
13:95-98.
Sinclair, J.B. & Fenn, R.W.D. 1999. Geology and the Border Squires. The Transactions of the Radnorshire Society 69:
143-172.
Waller, R. 1994. Conservation risk assessment: a strategy for managing resources for preventive conservation. Pp 12-16
in: Preventive conservation practice, theory and research, London. (Ashok, R. & Smith, P. eds.) The International Institute
for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works.
ABSTRACT. Data entry from images of the data sources (museum documentation, specimens
and labels), in computers located remotely, through on line platforms, and potentially open
to public participation, is an ex-situ collections digitisation method that is related to the
wide development of information and communication technologies (TIC), the Internet, and
the citizen science concept. The idea, named crowdsourcing, is very recent and is being
explored by European natural history museums through the SYNTHESYS3 project. We have
not found any literature comparing, in this specific context, effectiveness and accuracy
between crowdsourcing and in-situ methods by using images. We aim to find answers, based
on experimental data from two partners of the project, to draw some preliminary conclusions
that intend to contribute to the development of a European crowdsourcing website. Preliminary
results indicate that this crowdsourcing platform is less accurate than in-situ method, but
much more efficient. Identifying the most effective types of quality controls, and understand
more about the remote users’ motivations are now a priority of the project, because they
increase accuracy.
ORAL PRESENTATION
Digitization and imaging
collections: new methods,
ideas, and uses
Preliminary analysis of
effectiveness and accuracy
of crowdsourcing vs in-situ
digitisation methods
Josefina Barreiro* 1
Celia M. Santos-Mazorra2
Marisol Alonso3
Marian Ramos4
1 Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC),
Ornithological collection, Madrid, 28006, Spain
2 Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC),
Paleobotany and fossil invertebrates collection, Madrid,
28006, Spain
3 Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC),
Media library and audiovisual services, Madrid, 28006,
Spain
4 Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC),
Biodiversity Department, Madrid, 28006, Spain
* jbarreiro@mncn.csic.es
B
Table 1. Digitisation process evolution.
Table 2. Fields of Datasets. Palaeontology transcribers must complete all fields.
Fields in light blue background, in ornithology dataset, are automatics.
SPNHC 2016 – Oral and poster presentations, sorted alphabetically by first author SPNHC 2016 – Oral and poster presentations, sorted alphabetically by first author
82 83
ABSTRACT. FishNet2 (http://www.FishNet2.net) is a highly-regarded, global network for
sharing information in fish collection databases with researchers around the world. However,
the FishNet2 provider list is heavily weighted toward fish collections in the U.S., Canada,
Australia and Japan (http://www.FishNet2.net/providerList.aspx). Few European collections
are represented in the network, only a single South American collection is represented, and no
African or Asian collections are represented. Fish collections in Europe house large numbers
of specimens from developing countries in Africa and Southeast Asia. The paucity of data in
FishNet2 from European fish collections, and the very small numbers of fish collections in
Africa and Southeast Asia with published data in FishNet2 or available elsewhere, presents
a particular problem for researchers engaged in taxonomic, ecological and conservation
studies in developing African and Asian countries. The ability to visualize specimens remotely,
especially name-bearing type specimens, is a valuable service to researchers in the developing
world, who would otherwise have to travel to the museums to examine the specimens. Adding
specimen visualization capability to FishNet2 and computer tools for taking measurements
from specimen images would benefit researchers in developing countries. We present a plan for
expanding and enhancing Fishnet2 to give developing country scientists increased access to
the network.
ABSTRACT. Climate monitoring of collection rooms allows for analysis of climate cycles,
causes and influences of the building structure as well as modelling and prognostics of certain
constructional and organizational measures. Existing long-term records of temperature and
humidity in untreated collection rooms reflect both, the impact of external (weather) and
human induced variations of the storage conditions which might affect the long-term stability
of the collections for future research. The application of time series analysis of the datasets
provides a basis for aimed experimental studies identifying potentially destructive factors for
difficult types of organic and inorganic collection materials and indications of least-destructive
environments. A sustainable long-term preservation strategy of the vastly different materials
of natural history collection objects must respect differentiation of materials and collection
types. This may be in conflict with biological systematics and coincide with severe logistic
problems of scientific use of the collections. These have to be considered in the planning of
a construction project far in advance. In the current second phase of reconstruction of our
building we aim at improvement of conservational climate needs. But, it is also demonstrated
that there are clear limits of the combined, multifunctional use of a protected building
monument of 1889.
ABSTRACT. The Natural History community developed a capable global infrastructure for
publishing Natural History collection information on the Internet. With networks such as GBIF
and BioCASE specimen multimedia objects and metadata can be retrieved instantly and freely.
Digital libraries have started similar efforts with focus on cultural history content. A prominent
example is the cross-domain portal Europeana (www.europeana.eu) with its vision to make
Europe’s cultural heritage as easily accessible and as freely reusable as possible.
A growing number of Natural History Museums realised that publishing their data on multiple
portals serving different user communities significantly increases their visibility and reputation
towards research funding organizations and within society. However, in particular smaller
museums often fail to feed multiple publication channels.
We have developed an efficient framework for publishing Natural History collection data –
both in biodiversity information networks and Europeana with minimum effort. Museums just
have to configure one of the data provider packages IPT or BPS, which directly implement the
connectivity to biodiversity portals. In addition, harvesting, aggregation, and transformation
components built by the EU-project OpenUp! establish a second pipeline for data search and
display in the Europeana Portal. New provider installations are supported by the helpdesk of
the BioCASE network (www.biocase.org).
ORAL PRESENTATION
Digitization and imaging
collections: new methods,
ideas, and uses
Enhancing FishNet2 to increase
access of developing country
scientists to fish specimens
records in developed country
museums
Henry L. Bart Jr.* 1
Nelson E. Rios1
1 Tulane University Biodiversity Research Institute, 3705
Main Street, Belle Chasse, LA, 70037, USA
* hbartjr@tulane.edu
ORAL PRESENTATION
Green Museum – How to
practice what we preach?
(General session)
Climate monitoring and
perspectives for a sensible use
of a marvelous old building
Peter Bartsch* 1
Ulrich Struck1
Detlef Willborn1
1 Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-
und Biodiversitätsforschung, Invalidenstraße 43, 10115
Berlin, Germany
* peter.bartsch@mfn-berlin.de
ORAL PRESENTATION
Enabling Infrastructure: Future
Collections, Data & Informatics
(Synthesys Symposium)
Natural history online - An
efficient data publication
framework for museum
collections
Gisela Baumann* 1
Wolf-Henning Kusber1
Jörg Holetschek1
Anton Güntsch1
Walter G. Berendsohn1
1 Freie Universität Berlin, Botanic Garden and Botanical
Museum Berlin, 14195, Germany
* g.baumann@bgbm.org
Effectiveness. The amount of data transcribed per month through crowdsourcing (4,001/684)
was higher than in in-situ (395/274). Nevertheless, the actual effectiveness of NHM was not
100% because NHM-dataset included replicated records.
Accuracy. Data showed that the accuracy of crowdsourcing (NHM) was much smaller than
the accuracy of the data obtained in-situ at the MNCN-CSIC. In case of data obtained by
crowdsourcing, the error rate in identifier field was very high, although significantly lower in
registered (2.73%) than in anonym-users (12.93%). Error rate in in-situ transcriptions was
much smaller than in crowdsourcing, and was higher in the group of students (0.59%) than
among temporary staff (0.24%), although these last differences were not significant. To assess
if error in NHN-records was only due to a human error, the error rate in the field page_number
was calculated as well. In this field the error rate was a lot lower than before, 0.5% for
registered users (lower than in-situ-students at MNCN-CSIC) and 1.0% for anonym-users. This
means that high error rate in identifier NHM was due not only human error.
In natural history collections, there is a great deal of handwritten documentation which is not
easily recognizable with automatic systems like OCR. Digitising these documents requires
human intervention, to interpret or translate some special characters (quotation marks,
missing alphanumeric characters) (Table 5). Some kinds of problems were detected, so the
crowdsourcing tutorial should have specified how to make a good digitisation, not only a
transcription, in order to get accurate data.
Regarding incentive problem, in NHM was higher in anonym-users than in registered ones.
80% of NHM users did not complete any pages, and 38.6% only digitised one row. To compare
motivation over time, number of digitised rows was quantified for the same period of time, in
two successive years 2014 and 2015. The huge difference in the number of digitised rows
in these two years (4,503 vs 596) confirmed that the motivation of the crowd decreased over
time.
The SuperUser (NHM) was much more effective and accurate than the rest of collaborator
(including in-situ MNCN-CSIC, Table 4), and he or she seems to be very motivated.
CONCLUSIONS. Preliminary results indicate that this crowdsourcing platform is less accurate
than in-situ method, but much more efficient, since the task of digitising data associated with
natural history collections takes less time using the portal. Avoiding replicate records would
have improved its effectiveness. Accuracy has been affected by problems related with lack
of adequate filtering of users, inadequate definition of some tasks, and unknown incentive
problems. The accuracy of outcomes in this crowdsourcing platform would have been improved
through refining task description and guidelines, avoiding unregistered users, controlling who
can digitise and who cannot, and by creating open and clear reviewing procedures. Identifying
the most effective types of control, and understand more about the superusers’ motivations is
now a priority in the project.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. These results have been possible thanks to the collaboration of the
Natural History Museum, London and the funding by SYNTHESYS3 FP7 EU.
REFERENCES
Kulkarni, A., P. Gutheim, P. Narula, D. Rolnitzky, T. Parikh, & B. Hartmann. 2012. MobileWorks:
Designing for Quality in a Managed Crowdsourcing Architecture. IEEE Internet Computing 16(5): 28-35.
Table 5. The three first lines of one NHM ornithological register, ideally transcribed
by two systems: automatic vs human.
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the distinction between several components that are mixed into a thin powder. Samples are
also characterized with a Raman microscope (inVia, Renishaw, UK; 532 nm, 0.5 to 2.5 mW,
50x objective) following a protocol already described elsewhere (Rouchon et al., 2012).
Control of environmental conditions. The building that receives mineralogical collections has
no air conditioning, meaning that the specimens are subjected to substantial variations of
temperature and humidity conditions. These variations obviously affect phase transformations
and are thus measured by the use of small sensors (Hygrobutton, ProgesPlus, USA).
RESULTS AND PERSPECTIVES. A progress report of this work will be presented. It appeared
that some of the melanterite specimens have dehydrated into rozenite (FeIISO4·4H2O) and
szomolnokite (FeIISO4·H2O) powders, probably because the MNHN environment is relatively dry
all over the year. These altered melanterite specimens may also contain FeIII bearing sulfates
albeit in relatively small amounts, meaning that iron is poorly oxidized, despite the fact that
specimens were exposed to air for several decades. Interestingly, some of the specimens, stored
in closed vessels seem relatively unaltered, probably because the specimen was acting as a
moisture buffer inside the vessel. On some of these specimens, the airtightness of the wax joint
appears questionable, meaning that some re-housing option should be considered taking into
account the physical constrains of the building and storage furniture.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. The research was realized in partnership with the Minerological
Collection Management Unit, Collection Department, MNHN, France.
REFERENCES
Chou, I.M., R. R. Seal & B. S. Hemingway. 2002. Determination of melanterite-rozenite and chalcanthite-bonattite
equilibria by humidity measurements at 0.1 MPa. American Mineralogist 87:108-114.
Jambor, J.L., D. K. Nordstrom & C. N. Alpers. 2000. Metal-sulfate Salts from Sulfide Mineral Oxidation. Pp 302-350, in:
Sulfate Minerals : Crystallography, Geochemistry, and Environmental Significance (Jambor, J.L., D. K. Nordstrom & C. .N.
Alpers, eds.), Mineralogical Society of America, Washington DC.
Rouchon, V., H. Badet, O. Belhadj, O. Bonnerot, B. Lavédrine, J. G. Michard, & S. Miska. 2012. Raman and FTIR
spectroscopy applied to the conservation report of paleontological collections : identification of Raman and FTIR
signatures of several iron sulfate species such as ferrinatrite and sideronatrite. Journal of Raman Spectroscopy
43:1265-1274.
Sobron, P. & C. N. Alpers. 2013. Raman Spectroscopy of Efflorescent Sulfate Salts from Iron Mountain Mine Superfund
Site, California. Astrobiology 13, 270-278.
Figure 1. Melanterite specimens of the MNHN collection.
Left: relatively well preserved specimen (MIN110.231, 1910) in a closed vessel sealed with a wax joint. Right : altered specimen (MIN117.16, 1917) that mainly
turned into rozenite and szomolnokite.
ABSTRACT. The Spirit Collection at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew is the largest fluid
preserved botanical collection in the UK. The collection currently stands at 73,000 specimens
and continues to accept new accessions from overseas fieldwork, Kew’s Living Collection
and occasional donors, with approximately 1,000 new accessions a year. About half of the
collection are orchid specimens, but more than 370 families are represented. The Spirit
Collection does not stand isolated from the other Kew collections and many specimens
have associated herbarium sheets, carpological material and DNA voucher specimens in the
Herbarium and Jodrell Laboratory. The oldest material dates from 1805 and the collection
requires constant monitoring and occasional topping up of the fluid in the jar. It is primarily
used in scientific research and the specimens are kept in easily accessible jars. The collection
is kept in moveable storage in a temperature controlled room and has additional systems in
place for fire prevention and monitoring toxicity levels. The specimens are preserved in 53%
IMS (industrial methylated spirit [90% methylated ethyl alcohol]); 37% water (not distilled);
5% formaldehyde solution (40% HCHO); 5% glycerol and is referred to as Kew Mix.
ABSTRACT. This works deals with a survey undertaken on the collection of iron sulfate
minerals of the Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle, France. This collection has a high
significance with respect of Acid Mine Drainage phenomena. Yet differences are sometimes
noticed between the mineralogical phases present in a specimen and those that are mentioned
on its label. These differences are not only attributable to knowledge evolution in mineralogy
but also to physical evolution of the specimen itself. Indeed iron sulfate minerals may present
a great instability when exposed to inappropriate humidity and temperature conditions. These
aspects are poorly documented in the literature, but remain of great relevance to preserve the
collection and to understand sulfate formation pathways.
This paper presents the progress report of this survey that first focuses on melanterite
(FeIISO4·7H2O) specimens.
INTRODUCTION. Iron sulfate forms a large mineralogical family that stimulated in the past
decade strong interest in the material science community. Indeed, iron and sulfate can be
found in a great variety of crystals, growing naturally in metal sulfide mines. These crystals
result from the oxidation of sulfides provoked by a combined impact of water and oxygen. They
have been collected (and also synthetized) since antiquity. They show different aspects (color,
shape) and their names changed from one era to another, leading to numerous confusions
and misinterpretations. Moreover, many of these crystals are relatively unstable: in ambient
conditions they may go through hydration/dehydration phenomena and ferrous iron may oxidize
to ferric iron. Relatively little knowledge is available regarding environmental conditions
(temperature/humidity) that guarantee their stability. Therefore conservation of iron sulfate
specimens remains a challenge.
This work deals with the characterization of iron sulfate specimens housed at the Museum
National d’Histoire Naturelle (MNHN), Paris. It aims to document more precisely the collection
and thus increase its value. Comparison of present and initial compositions should also, in the
long run, help to identify possible pathways of iron sulfate formations.
METHODS
Sample. Specimens classified under the appellation “mélanterite” were chosen for several
reasons : firstly, during pyrite oxidation in humid environment, melanterite (FeIISO4·7H2O) is
one of the first formed phase; secondly, its stability domain is relatively well documented [Chou
2002]; thirdly, it may form in mines spectacular blue to green stalactites that were easily
collected by mineralogists (Figure 1, right); fourthly, it can include many metal impurities
(copper, magnesium, zinc) as it forms solid solutions with boothite (CuIISO4·7H2O), epsomite
(MgSO4·7H2O) or goslarite (ZnIISO4·7H2O) phases [Jambor et al 2000]; and last but not least,
many of the specimens had obviously turned into other iron sulfate phases (Figure 1, left).
Analysis. Micro Raman spectrometry is a powerful tool for the speciation of sulfate minerals
(Sobron and Alpers 2013). It is used for the characterization of damaged specimens taking
advantage of the fact that (i) it does not damage the sample provided the use of a sufficiently
low beam power and (ii) the analysis, performed on an area of a few micron-squares, enables
POSTER
Preventive conservation and
material science
Curating the Royal Botanic
Gardens, Kew Spirit Collection
Melissa Bavington* 1
1 Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, science, London,
TW9 3AE, UK
* m.bavington@kew.org
POSTER
Preventive conservation and
material science
Preserving iron sulfate
specimens
Oulfa Belhadj* 1
Cristiano Ferraris2
Jean Marc Fourcault2
Véronique Rouchon1
1 Centre de recherche sur la conservation (CRC, USR 3224),
Sorbonne Universités, Muséum National d'Histoire
Naturelle, Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication,
CNRS ; CP21, 36 rue Geoffroy-Saint-Hilaire, 75005 Paris,
France
2 Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux et de
Cosmochimie (IMPMC, UMR7590), Sorbonne Universités,
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, 61 rue Buffon,
75005 Paris, France
* belhadj@mnhn.fr
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The whale beached at Wexford, Ireland in 1891 and was thought to be about 5yrs of
age at time of death. The skeleton was purchased by the NHM in 1891 for £250. It
was held in storage as part of the NHM’s Cetacea research collection until 1934 when
it was placed into the Mammals Hall on public display (R. Sabin, pers. Comm. 03 Sept
2015).
PLANNING AND PREPARATION. A particularly crucial aspect of moving the blue
whale skeleton was whether or not it could actually withstand the strains and stresses
of dismantling, transportation and remounting. Due to the complicated and high-risk
nature of this project, many specialists were involved, including conservators, curators,
project managers, scaffolders, structural engineers, specimen handlers and mount
makers.
Environmental Conditions. Alongside other specimens which are to be put on
open display in this space the environment was looked at in terms of sustainable
improvements. Works are being undertaken to improve the conditions by utilizing natural
ventilation and re-using existing duct work. This will help to minimise fluctuations and
high temperatures exhibited in the summer months.
Cleaning. Cleaning was necessary to inform the dismantling process about the condition
of the blue whale skeleton, (as a thick layer of dust had accumulated) (Figure 2). A low-
suction vacuum with a soft brush was used to gently remove dust – a total of 1.3kgs of
dust was collected from a surface area of approximately 110.4 m2.
Documentation. Digital images, videos, analytical samples, drawings and reports were
used to capture as much information regarding specimen condition as possible. Each
skeletal element was inspected with a particular emphasis on signs of fragility and
weakness which was then recorded in a condition report used to inform the dismantling
process. Labels were attached to bone features with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)
tape to ensure that correct articulation would be maintained during re-mounting of the
specimen (Figure 3).
DISMANTLING THE SPECIMEN. Dismantling was carried out in several phases
beginning with the smallest caudal vertebra. As more skeletal elements were removed
the complexity, volume and weight increased.
Postcranial skeleton. As there was little documentation associated with how the
specimen had been mounted, each bone presented an unknown challenge. The first
discovery was two steel metal rods embedded through the first caudal vertebrae. Both
had been fashioned into a loop at the posterior end to prevent it from being removed or
sliding off easily (Figure 4). This was remedied by using a small hacksaw and carefully cutting
off the first loop. The internal armature of the remaining vertebrae was a rectangular iron bar
bolted in sections, that ran throughout the length of the vertebral column.
Once the first 8 caudal vertebrae were successfully removed, the cable suspension metalwork
that was bolted into the armature had to be removed as it effectively blocked the removal of
more vertebrae. A support gantry was wheeled into place and a sling was placed under the
exposed metal armature to support the structure as the first cable was uncoupled (Figure 5).
Further along the vertebral column, other skeletal elements had to be removed to ensure
progress towards the skull, including the chevrons, pelvic bones, scapula, radius, ulna,
phalanges, ribs, stenebra and hyoids. Each was bolted onto the armature or had additional
armature attached and had to be removed in a specific order so that other bones could then
be safely removed. For example, the pectoral fins could not be removed until the ribs were
completely dismantled.
Figure 1. The blue whale skeleton suspended in the Mammals Gallery prior to
dismantling.
Figure 2. A thick layer of dust had settled on the surface of the blue whale
skeleton. This was obscuring details regarding its condition to inform the
dismantling process.
Figure 3. Each bone had to be carefully labelled to ensure that the correct
articulation will be maintained in the new pose.
Figure 4. Removal of the first caudal vertebra
revealed two metal rods terminating in a loop at
the posterior end of the specimen.
ABSTRACT. Some time back a Network Integrated Biocollections Alliance (NIBA) was created
to establish a framework for leveraging the wealth of resources represented by the nation’s
biocollections through digitization of specimens and associated metadata, creating a massive,
distributed tool for addressing grand challenges across a wide range of scientific endeavor.
Significant progress has been made toward the implementation of NIBA, by iDigBio and others,
but much more work remains. In 2014, the National Science Foundation funded a Research
Coordination Network (RCN) grant to support efforts to foster the continued engagement
with and development of a sustainable, networked community of practice. The Biodiversity
Collections Network (BCoN) RCN is working with the community to evaluate current and future
needs. However, our first step is to identify this community, engage them in the work of the
RCN and work together on collections advocacy and a sustainable infrastructure to support
future work. This community is comprised of not only existing national and international
collections initiatives within our community but a broad ranging list of external user groups.
It also includes publishers and funding agencies. This talk will provide an update on BCoN
activities and set the scene for impending initiatives.
ABSTRACT. AnnoSys is a web-based system for correcting and enriching biodiversity data in
publicly available data portals. The current release of AnnoSys (https://annosys.bgbm.org/)
establishes a number of workflows enabling online annotations using the example of biological
collection and observation data. Currently, it is integrated into a dozen biodiversity data portals
and provides means to edit, manage and publish annotations referring to these data via its
web-based user interface. Additionally, the web interface enables curators to communicate
decisions with regard to the acceptance or rejection of annotations referring to data objects in
their collections. It aims at stimulating further demands for integrating its functionality from
additional data portals, at the same time fostering the support of additional data standards as
well as new use cases and applications.
Based on a generic annotation context model, which is implemented using the W3C Open
Annotation Data Model, the AnnoSys repository archives annotations and the related original
collection data. The resulting annotation records are publicly retrievable and integrable with
other systems through Linked Data mechanisms, REST- and SPARQL-based web services.
Beyond that, a customised subscription-based message system permits registered AnnoSys
users (curators and researchers) to be informed by email about annotation related events.
ABSTRACT. The Natural History Museum (London, UK) intends to suspend a 25 metre-long,
blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) from its central Hintze Hall. Alongside other specimens
which are to be put on open display in this space the environment was looked at in terms of
sustainable improvements. Works are being undertaken to improve the conditions by utilizing
natural ventilation and re-using existing duct work.
This specimen, acquired by the Museum in 1891, was suspended from the ceiling of the
Mammal Hall, where it has been on display since 1934. Conservators worked with a specialist
specimen handling company to carefully dismantle and remove each of the 220 bones from its
original mount. The skull required a special frame and a precise calculation of movement to
dismantle it and remove it. Many complex decisions were made during this process – as each
bone removal did not dictate what the next would bring. During the dismantling phase, the
conservation team have had to address the many requirements of curators, researchers, senior
management and the media.
INTRODUCTION. A 25-metre long blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) skeleton has been
suspended in the Natural History Museum’s (London, UK) Mammals and Blue Whale gallery
since 1934 (Figure 1). Following months of careful consideration this specimen was chosen to
take centre stage in Hintze Hall, to give an introduction that illustrates the museum’s research
into the rich biodiversity of life on Earth and a sustainable future, as well as the origins and
evolution of that life. This also meant that it had to be completely dismantled and removed for
conservation treatment to then be re-suspended.
ORAL PRESENTATION
Collections for the future –
future of collections
Biodiversity Collections Network
(BCoN) Research Coordination
Network (RCN): Sustainability,
advocacy and community
Andrew Bentley* 1
1 Biodiversity Institute, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS,
66045, USA
* abentley@ku.edu
POSTER
Collections for the future –
future of collections
AnnoSys: A generic online
annotation system for scientific
collections
Walter G. Berendsohn* 1
Lutz Suhrbier1
Wolf-Henning Kusber1
Anton Güntsch1
1 Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum Berlin,
Freie Universität Berlin, Königin-Luise-Str. 6-8, 14195
Berlin, Germany
* w.berendsohn@bgbm.org
ORAL PRESENTATION
Preventive conservation and
material science
Blue Whale on the move:
Dismantling a 125 year-old
specimen
Arianna Bernucci* 1
Lorraine Cornish2
Cheryl Lynn1
1 Conservator, Core Research Labs, London, E10 7DU, UK
2 Head of Conservation, Core Research Labs, London,
E10 7DU, UK
* arib@nhm.ac.uk
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88 89
ABSTRACT. An accurate accounting of a biological collection’s holdings can be used to
prioritize digitization, expose specimens for scientific research, determine curatorial needs, and
prioritize field work and acquisitions by identifying gaps in the collection. Unfortunately, many
biocollection institutions have only an estimate of the number and taxonomic and geographic
scope of the items in a collection. The Botanical Research Institute of Texas (BRIT) conducted
an inventory of the herbarium collections in 2015 using a purpose-built web application
called the BRIT Rapid Inventory of Specimen Collections (BRISC). BRISC allowed individuals
with wireless tablets to inventory the contents of each cabinet, accounting for the number
of specimens of each species as well as the geographic region of each specimen. Over the
course of 11 months, 136 volunteers, interns, and BRIT staff members spent 241 person-
days inventorying the collection. The resulting dataset provides highly-accurate details of the
herbarium's holdings which can be published, queried, and analyzed to inform digitization
strategies, curation prioritization, and research activity. BRISC was developed using the Django
web framework and the Python programming language and is released under an open-source
license.
ABSTRACT. Microscopic slides, although seemingly standard objects, may represent a
challenge in digitisation. Our pilot project's two main objectives were to record collection
data and to obtain high resolution images, are best achieved through two entirely different
workflows; mass digitisation and high resolution. We describe use of multi-specimen imaging
(SatScan) and image segmentation and annotation software (Inselect) for mass digitisation.
High resolution digitisation requires automated systems to increase the rate of imaging
(Zeiss Axioscan and Zeiss AxioZoom). We discuss these two digitisation workflows and the
implications of using a volunteer workforce on costs and productivity.
ABSTRACT. Commonly, the loss of collection objects is caused by chemical processes
that destroy these specimens slowly and inconspicuously. My master’s thesis focuses on
the deterioration of skins and hides in the mammal collection at Museum für Naturkunde
Berlin, Germany. The skins and hides are easily tearable and often torn or damaged. Studies
concerning deterioration processes in mammal collections are rare and only few publications
are available. Comparable studies can be found in projects of leather research. In my thesis
unpublished knowledge of taxidermists, tanners, and researchers of interdisciplinary special
fields from Germany, France, Sweden and Switzerland is gathered, matched and compared
with available publications. Acid-induced decay caused by inadequate conservation techniques
seems to be the main reason for deterioration. Sulfuric acid demolishes structures in the skin
and reduces the tear strength. Poor storage conditions accelerate the deterioration processes.
Measurements were made in the mammal collection of Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin,
Germany (MfN) and Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig in Bonn, Germany
(ZFMK). Parameters, like tear strength, pH and age, were taken and compared in skins of
Lepus europaeus, Meles meles and Vulpes vulpes. There is a significant correlation between
tear strength, surface pH and age of the specimens. On average, 80 % of the skins of L.
europaeus and V. vulpes show vastly reduced tear strength in MfN. Extrapolated, 24,000 skins
and hides are affected by deterioration in the whole mammal collection in MfN.
ORAL PRESENTATION
DemoCamp
Rapid collection inventories
Jason Best * 1
Tiana Rehman1
1 Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, Texas,
76107-3400, USA
* jbest@brit.org
ORAL PRESENTATION
Digitization and imaging
collections: new methods,
ideas, and uses
"To slide or not to slide" – How
do we scan the Natural History
Museum's slide collections?
Vladimir Blagoderov* 1
E. Louise Allan1
Alex Ball1
Benjamin Price1
Rebecca Summerfield1
Emma Sherlock1
Flavia Toloni1
Peter Wing1
1 Natural History Museum, SW7 5BD, London, UK
* vlab@nhm.ac.uk
ORAL PRESENTATION
Preventive conservation and
material science
Deterioration processes in
skins and hides of mammal
collections
Steffen Bock* 1
1 Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz Institute for Evolution and
Biodiversity Science, 10115 Berlin, Germany
* steffen.bock@mfn-berlin.de
During the dismantling process, it was discovered that the intervertebral discs were
composed of plaster of Paris, wood blocks and crumpled pieces of newspaper from the
early 1930s (Figure 6).
Cranium and Mandibles. The final stages of dismantling involved removing the two
mandible halves and the skull. The first challenge was to excavate around each bolt
connection and uncouple the mandibles from the skull whilst providing full support
to each element. Each mandible was then packed into a bespoke wooden frame so it
could be carefully lowered down to the floor of the mammal gallery (Figure 7).
The skull is almost 6 metres in length and three metres at its widest point. It is highly
complex in shape with over individual 40 elements fused or partly fused together.
The first challenge was to lift and move it without placing any strain on the bone.
The second challenge was that, due to existing cable supporting the whale model
underneath (which could not be moved or removed), the skull was going to need to
be rotated as we moved it, so that it would fit through the gap between the cable and
the side of the scaffolding to enable it to be lowered to the ground floor of the gallery
without causing any damage. A bespoke steel cradle had been designed to be placed
underneath the skull and existing holes and bolted areas of the skull were used to
attach it to the cradle (Figure 8). Crack monitor gauges had been placed at existing
vulnerable parts of the skull to provide an additional recording mechanism for cracks
opening up during the process. Extra removable sides were then added to the cradle,
to provide extra protection for the rotation and subsequent move.
CONCLUSIONS. The skeletal elements are spread over three separate areas of the
museum as there are about 220 bones in total. They will be undergoing conservation
treatment over the next few months in the Darwin Centre gallery Pop up Conservation
Studio (Figure 9).
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. Thanks are due to the project manager Jennifer Flippance,
curator Richard Sabin, Unique Scaffold, and Constantine Ltd.
Figure 5. A large gantry was used to support the main armature while vertebrae
were removed and cables were uncoupled.
Figure 6. Each intervertebral disc was composed of plaster of Paris, newspaper
and wood blocks.
Figure 7. Each mandible was carefully packed into a bespoke wooden cradle
and then lowered to the ground.
Figure 8. Due to the complex and high-risk nature of removing the whale skull,
it required a specialist frame for support.
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90 91
reducting stomatal density and leaf mass per area. Even though the site is located far from
major nitrogen emission, the increase in nitrogen deposition may have resulted in higher
N-concentrations in leaves.
3. Plant traits, ecology and distribution. The locations of herbarium specimens combined with
genetic samples are used to model the distribution of Erythrophleum species and genetic pools,
and to specifically identify the environmental factors that limit the distribution of species and
genetic pools. Two hypotheses are tested: 1) the forest refuge hypothesis: a differentiation
that has occurred in the absence of ecological niche divergence and 2) the environmental
filtering hypothesis: the role of ecological gradients in the speciation of Erythrophleum species.
Environmental Niche Models for Erythrophleum ivorense, E. suaveolens and E. africanum,
and two genepools for E. ivorense, three for E. suaveolens are generated using the Maxent
Algorithm and BIOCLIM data (altitude and climate) as environmental predictors. All models
had significant validation support. Using an index of niche overlap and similarity tests,
strong differences in environmental niches between species show the affinity of E. ivorense,
E. suaveolens and E. africanum for wet evergreen forests, moist forests and dry forests and
woody savannas respectively. Within genetic pools only significant differences in environmental
niches between the two Northern and Southern pools of E. suaveolens were identified, and
it is suspected that there is a differentiation due to specific environmental condition, partly
because they show the same phenological behaviour. In a similar study on Guibourtia species,
it was possible by using herbaria to link the inflorescence position (terminal or axial) to species
habitat (wet or dry).
4. Plant phenology. Herbaria are alternative sources for comparative plant phenological
research, especially for tropical regions where surveys are lacking for most species. Herbarium
data are used to determine the flowering (or fruiting) pattern (annual, sub-annual, supra-
annual, or continuous). For species or populations with annual phenological patterns,
herbarium records are used to estimate the mean time of occurrence of the reproductive event,
as well as the concentration of phenological activity. This enables exploring inter- and intra-
specific variations in phenology relative to seasonal conditions throughout the whole species
range.
CONCLUSION. Recent progress in analytical techniques and information technology
increased the diversity of users and uses of herbaria significantly. Based on the large amount
of different studies using herbarium samples from the Garden, it is clear that the institute
harbours a collection useful for a wide range of disciplines, bringing scientific disciplines
together. Carefully monitoring and documenting these activities, actively promoting new uses,
prospecting opportunities and participating in research projects by curators, significantly
increases uses and helps collections to proof their relevance. It offers collections perspectives
for the future.
ABSTRACT. The Botanic Garden Meise monitors the different uses of its African Herbarium
since 2013. The inventoried studies can be grouped into six different topics: taxonomy &
systematics, morphology & anatomy, identification & vouchers, molecular research, traits
& global change, traits, ecology & distribution, and phenology. Due to recent progresses in
analytical techniques and information technology it is clear that the African Herbarium of the
Botanic Garden Meise harbours a collection that can be used for a wide range of disciplines
other than the traditional ones. Carefully monitoring and documenting these new uses
illustrates the potential of the collections and proofs the ongoing relevance of collections for
the future.
INTRODUCTION. The origin of herbaria traces back to the 16th century. The word herbarium
referred to a book about medicinal plants. Herbaria were initially used as a tool to identify
and illustrate medical plants. Since the Renaissance, Botanical Gardens and Universities
were founded throughout Europe. They promulgated the importance of making herbaria. The
early years’ focus changed in the 17th century when new continents were explored and an
overwhelming biodiversity was discovered. Botany gradually established its independence from
medicine. Today ca. 3,000 herbaria are registered in Index Herbariorum and contain over 350
million specimens. Herbaria cover a wide range of taxonomic lineages, from plants to fungi,
algae and myxomycetes. The main objective of herbaria is to document, identify and describe
‘plant’ diversity, however herbaria contain a huge potential for cutting edge research in other
disciplines as well.
MATERIAL AND METHODS. The Botanic Garden Meise houses approximately 4 million
herbarium specimens with a worldwide scope. The African Herbarium holds 1 million
specimens collected during 140 years. The focus is on the D.R. Congo with ca. 500,000
specimens, equal to ca. 85% of collections ever made there. Many specimens are linked with
wood samples, liquid collections, seedlings, fruits, etc. The African Herbarium is intensively
studied by taxonomists.
We reviewed the uses of the African Herbarium since 2013 and grouped them according to the
following topics: taxonomy & systematics, morphology & anatomy, identification & vouchers,
molecular research, traits & global change, traits, ecology & distribution, and phenology. The
four last mentioned uses are discussed here in order to illustrate the potential of herbaria. The
studies are on-going and results are still unpublished.
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
1. Molecular research. During the last decades, molecular technologies were revolutionised.
Improved protocols allow extracting DNA from 50 year old herbarium samples with an average
success of 60% for non-alcohol dried specimens. Even specimens up to 100 years old, treated
with mercury-chloride have a 10% success rate. This makes herbaria an important source for
phylogenetic and genetic studies and barcoding. Barcoding provides a complementary tool
for identification and was used to verify identifications of rainforest trees in the Biosphere
Reserve Yangambi (D.R. Congo). Many samples could not be identified with traditional
methods because of the lack of fruits and flowers. A new approach combining herbarium-based
identification and barcoding, allowed identifying sterile samples from 46%, over 60% to 89%
(field, herbarium and combined identifications respectively). In another study, herbarium
samples revealed genetic variability of robusta-coffee from remote areas in Africa for which no
recent samples exist.
2. Plant traits and global change. Leaves respond to their environment. While some
adaptations disappear when dried, others are conserved and can be studied in herbarium
specimens. If the effects of various environmental parameters on leaves are understood, their
imprint on the structure and chemical composition of leaves is used to study the effect of the
environment on plants over time. In times of rapid anthropogenic changes, understanding the
effect of past changes is important to predict future plant responses. Herbaria, particularly
from collections when human impact on environment was smaller, represent an under-utilized
treasure. We used herbaria from the Luki Biosphere Reserve (D.R. Congo) collected between
1903 and 1959 and compared these with leaves from the same species and locality collected
recently. These suggest that trees responded to the 30% increase of atmospheric CO2 with
ORAL PRESENTATION
Collections for the future –
Future of collections
New technologies lead to new
uses in the herbarium of the
Botanic Garden Meise
Ann Bogaerts1
Steven Janssens1
Dakis-Yaoba Ouédraogo2
Peter Hietz3
Adeline Fayolle2
Anaïs-Pasiphaé Gorel2
Brecht Verstraeten1,4
Sofie De Smedt1
Piet Stoffelen* 1
1 Botanic Garden Meise, Nieuwe laan 38, 1860 Meise,
Belgium
2 University of Liège -- Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, BIOSE
-- Management of Forest Resources -- Tropical Forestry,
5030 Gembloux, Belgium
3 Institut für Botanik, Universität für Bodenkultur,
1180 Wien, Austria
4 Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of
Copenhagen, Sølvgade 83S, 1307 Copenhagen, Denmark
* piet.stoffelen@plantentuinmeise.be
B
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92 93
attached as multimedia records. This was then associated (Stage 4) with the correct catalogue
record using a web-based form developed in conjunction with Axiell which communicated
directly with our CMS (EMu). If there was no existing catalogue record then a new one was
created based on the stub record. Post-association, records were pushed through to a second
web-based form for transcribing (Stage 5).
The Transcription App retrieved from the CMS all data and images associated with each
catalogue record, which could then be supplemented with data collected as part of Stages 1
and 2. Metadata records (presented as lookups) were filtered through to the Transcription App
so only high quality pre-validated records (master records) can be seen and associated with
specimen records. If no relevant master records were retrieved, data was entered verbatim,
reviewed by the project support assistant (Stage 6) and used as the basis for creating additional
master records (Stage 7). In this way, transcription became increasingly efficient over time as
more master records were available for association. Transcription was based on labels imaged at
the same time as specimens (Stage 2) and images of accession registers attached to catalogue
records (Stage 1).
RESULTS. On average 1.3 images were taken per specimen (one specimen image with labels