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A New Species of the genus Tydessa (Coleoptera: Pyrochroidae) from Taiwan

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A new species of the genus Tydessa, T. sasajii sp. nov., is described from Taiwan. This species is the third representative of this genus, and differs from Japanese species T. lewisi (Pic) by the strong blueish luster in the body (head, pronotum and elytra), and male genital structure. It is also distinguish from American species T. blaisdelli Pollock by the metallic luster in the body, and the presence of hind angles of pronotum.
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Japanese Journal of Systematic Entomology, 22 (1): 109–117. May 30, 2016.
Japanese Society of Systematic Entomology
A New Species of the genus Tydessa
(Coleoptera: Pyrochroidae) from Taiwan
Hiroyuki YOSHITOMI
Entomological Laboratory, Faculty of Agriculture, Ehime University,
3-5-7 Tarumi, Matsuyama, 790-8566 Japan. E-mail: hymushi@agr.ehime-u.ac.jp
Abstract A new species of the genus Tydessa, T. sasajii sp. nov., is described from Taiwan. This species is the third representative
of this genus, and differs from Japanese species T. lewisi (Pic) by the strong blueish luster in the body (head, pronotum and elytra),
and male genital structure. It is also distinguish from American species T. blaisdelli Pollock by the metallic luster in the body, and
the presence of hind angles of pronotum.
Introduction
Pyrochroidae Latreille, 1807, the fire-colored beetles,
is a small family in the superfamily Tenebrionoidea. This
family thought to be a sister group relationship with Boridae
or Anthicidae (McKenna et al., 2015), or Ischaliidae (=
Ischaliinae) + Aderidae (Hunt et al., 2007). The family is
divided into five subfamilies, Tydessinae Nikitsky, 1986,
Pilipalpinae Abdullah, 1964, Pyrochroinae Latreille, 1806,
Pedilinae Lacordaire, 1859, and Agnathinae Lacordaire,
1859. The phylogenetic relationship of these four subfamilies
was shown by Pollock (1994) as (Tydessinae + (Pilipalpinae
+ (Pedilinae + Pyrochroinae))). The remaining subfamily
Agnathinae is enigmatic, and it is placed as “Pyrochroidae
incertae sedis” (Lawrence and Newton, 1995; Young and
Pollock, 2010).
The genus Tydessa Peacock, 1982, the sole member of
the subfamily Tydessinae, is represented by two species from
Japan and North America (Peacock, 1982; Pollock, 1992)
and one undescribed species from Taiwan (Sasaji, 1986). In
the present paper, I describe a new species from Taiwan, with
redescription and comparison of the type species of the genus,
Tydessa lewisi.
Materials and Methods
General observations and dissections were made under a
Leica MZ95 stereo microscope. Microstructures of dissected
parts were studied in pure glycerine under an Olympus BH-2
compound microscope. After observation, the dissected parts
were mounted on the same card as the specimen. Photographs
were taken under a Leica MZ95, using a microscopy camera
system (Nikon DS-Fi1-L2), and combined with automontage
software Combine ZM (Alan Hadley, UK). Some structures
were observed with a SEM (Hitachi S-225) after coating with
gold (Fig. 2).
Morphological terminology follows Young and Pollock
(2010) and Watt (1987) for genital structures, and Kukalová-
Peck and Lawrence (1993, 2004) for wing venation.
The specimens examined are preserved in the following
museums:
EUMJ = Ehime University Museum, Matsuyama, Japan;
KUMJ = The Kyushu University Museum, Fukuoka, Japan;
TARI = Taiwan Agricultural Research Institute, Taipei, Taiwan
ROC.
Morphological abbreviations used for measurements are
as follows:
EL = elytral length in median line from anterior margin of
scutellar shield to elytral apex;
EW = maximum width of elytra;
HL = length of head from anterior margin of clypeus to
anterior margin of pronotum;
HW = width of head across eyes;
PL = pronotal length in median line;
PW = maximum width of pronotum;
TL = total length (HL + PL + EL).
The average is given in parentheses after the range.
Taxonomy
Subfamily Tydessinae Nikitsky, 1986
Genus Tydessa Peacock, 1982
Tydessa Peacock, 1982: 362. Nikitsky, 1986: 1182 [redes-
cription]. (Type species: Dasytes constrictus Lewis,
1895.)
Diagnosis. Adults. Body elongate, shiny, Coloration
of body brown to black, with/without metallic luster. Eyes
(Fig. 2G) large, prominent, separated each other. Antennae
relatively short, liform/submoniliform. Clypeus with straight
front margin. Labrum (Fig. 1A) transverse, with arcuate front
margin. Mandibles (Fig. 1C) triangular, bidentate at apex.
Maxillae (Fig. 1D) with 4-segmented palpi; apical segment
of palpi elongate-triangular. A pair of posterior pronotal pits
(Fig. 2A–F) situated near posterior angles, indistinct. Hind
wing (Fig. 1I) fully developed; without RC (radical cell).
Elytra elongate, shiny, closely covered with short setae (Fig.
1H), with obtuse apices. Metendosternite (Fig. 1E) Y-shaped;
stalk relatively stout; lamina wide; furcal arm long, extending
antero-laterally. Legs relatively short and slender. Tarsal
formula (Fig. 1F–H) 5-5-4; tarsal claws (Fig. 2I) with small
projection in basal parts.
Larvae (after Nikitsky, 1986 and Zaitsev, 2016). Body
distinctly at, elongate. Dorsal surface of body relatively well
sclerotized. Urogomphal plate (= segment IX) trapezoidal, with
a pair of small triangular urogpmphi, absent urogomphal pit.
Remarks. Except for the enigmatic subfamily Agnathinae,
110 Yoshitomi, H.
May 30, 2016, JJSE 22 (1)
the subfamily Tydessinae (= genus Tydessa) thought to
be a sister group relationship with the other members of
Pyrochroidae (Pollock, 1994). According to Pollock (1994),
the autapomorphies of the subfamily Tydessinae are as
follows: 1) larva having no urogomphal pit, 2) adult having
a pair of posterior pronotal pits. However, the rst character
state is a reversal to the primitive state (Pollock, 1994), and
the second is obscure and probably sexual dimorphic character
(Fig. 2A–F, see also description of T. lewisi).
Key to species of the genus Tydessa
1. Hind angles of pronotum indistinct; setae on pronotum
very short, barely visible; elytra without bluish luster;
body size larger (5.9–7.1 mm); distributed in North
America.......... T. blaisdelli Pollock, 1992
-. Hind angles of pronotum distinct; setae on pronotum
Fig. 1. Tydessa lewisi (Pic). A, Labrum, B, labium; C, left mandible in ventral aspect; D, left maxilla in ventral aspect; E, metendosternite; F,
fore tarsus; G, mid tarsus; H, hind tarsus; I, hind wing.
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A new Tydessa from Taiwan
May 30, 2016, JJSE 22 (1)
short but distinct; elytra with bluish luster; body size
smaller (3.5–5.5 mm); distributed in East Asia............... 2
2. Pronotum and elytra (Fig. 3A, B) with dull bluish
luster; pronotum (Fig. 4A, B) closely covered with short
suberect setae and punctures; scutellar shield longer
than wide; basal margin of basale of tegmen shallowly
concave; distributed in Japan............. T. lewisi (Pic, 1937)
-. Pronotum and elytra (Fig. 3C, D) with strong bluish
luster; pronotum (Fig. 4C, D) sparsely covered with short
setae and punctures; scutellar shield as long as wide;
basal margin of basale of tegmen arcuate; distributed in
Taiwan.................................................... T. sasajii sp. nov.
Tydessa lewisi (Pic, 1937)
(Figs. 1, 2, 3A, 3B, 4A, 4B, 5A–D, 6A–D, 7A–F)
Dasytes constrictus Lewis, 1895: 118 [type locality: Hitoyoshi
and Yuyama in Higo] (nec Broun, 1883).
Dasytes lewisi Pic, 1937: 74 (replacement name for Dasytes
constrictus Lewis, 1895).
Tydessa lewisi: Peacock, 1982: 362. Sasaji, 1984: 26. Nikitsky,
1986: 1186 [redescription of adult and description of
larva]. Yoshitomi & Kai, 2015: 37 [Japanese list].
Specimens examined. 1 Male (EUMJ), “Hikawa Rindo
Enzan c., YAMANASHI Japan, 8–9. VI. 1988 M. Hasegawa
leg.”; 3 males & 4 females (EUMJ), “[Lake Horai] ca. 300m
alt. Horai-cho, AICHI Japan, 18-IV-1997 M. Hasegawa leg.”;
1 female (EUMJ), “Higashiyama Kisofukushima Nagano
pref. 14. V. 1994 H. Yoshitomi leg.”; 1 female (EUMJ),
“Kisofukushima Kiso-gun Nagano pref. 4. V. 1994 H.
Yoshitomi leg.”; 3 males & 2 females (EUMJ), “[HONSHU,
JAPAN] Urayama Dam, Urayama, Chichibu-shi, Saitama
pref. 9. May. 2009 T. IWATA leg.”, “[At Light] 17.1°C
20:00–21:25”; 1 male & 1 female (EUMJ), “[HONSHU,
Fig. 2. SEM photographs of Tydessa lewisi (Pic), female (A–C) and male (D–I). A, D, Pronotum, B, E, posterior angle; C, F, posterior pit; G,
right eye; H, elytra; I, claw of hind leg.
112 Yoshitomi, H.
May 30, 2016, JJSE 22 (1)
Fig. 3. Habits of Tydessa spp. A, B, Tydessa lewisi (Pic); C, D, T. sasajii sp. nov. (C, holotype; D, paratype). A, C, Male; B, D, female.
113
A new Tydessa from Taiwan
May 30, 2016, JJSE 22 (1)
JAPAN] Urayama-dam, Chichibu-shi, Saitama-pref. 4, May,
2007 Tomofumi IWATA leg.”; 1 male (EUMJ), “[HONSHU,
JAPAN] Kamikagenomori, Chichibu-shi, Saitama pref.
18. Apr, 2009 Tomofumi IWATA leg.”; 1 female (EUMJ),
“JAPAN: Kochi Pref. Roadside of Route 40 (ca. 1,200m),
Terakawa, Ino-cho, Agawa-gun. 4. VI. 2011 Masaru
NISHIKAWA leg.”; 2 males (EUMJ), “EHIME: JAPAN
Komeno Matsuyama-city 22. V. 2005 T. Kitano leg.”; 1 female
(EUMJ), “EHIME: JAPAN Ishiduchi-skyline Kumakougen-
town 14. V. 2006 T. Kitano leg.”; 1 female (EUMJ), “EHIME:
JAPAN Narukawa Kihoku-town 15. V. 2005 T. Kitano leg.”;
1 male (EUMJ), “EHIME: JAPAN Komenono Matsuyama
City 21. V. 2005 Yugo Satoh leg.”; 1 female (EUMJ), “[Ehime:
Japan] Komeno Matsuyama-c. 17. V. 2003 Y. Kikuhara leg.”.
Diagnosis. Body with dull bluish luster; pronotum closely
covered with short suberect setae and punctures; scutellar
shield longer than wide; basal margin of basale of tegmen
shallowly concave.
Additional description. Male (Fig. 3A). Body oblong,
shiny, closely covered with short silver setae. Coloration of
body black with dully bluish luster in head, pronotum and
elytra; antennomeres II–III pale brown.
Head (Fig. 4A) large, with prominent eyes; HL/HW
0.63–0.76 (0.70). Antennae (Fig. 5A) long, submoniliform,
reaching at basal margin of elytra; approximate ratio of each
antennomere (n = 1) as 1.45 : 1.00 : 1.09 : 1.45 : 1.36 : 1.27 :
1.36 : 1.36 : 1.27 : 1.27 : 1.91. Pronotum (Fig. 4A) widest at
posterior end; posterior pronotal pits indistinct in male (Fig.
2D–F); PW/PL 1.11–1.32 (1.22). Scutellar shield (Fig. 4A)
ligulate. Elytra elongate, subparallel-sided near base to basal
1/2, widest at caudal 1/3; EL/EW 1.78–2.01 (1.89); EL/PL
3.47–3.86 (3.71); EW/PW 1.50–1.70 (1.61); TL/EW 2.62–2.98
Fig. 4. Head and pronotum of Tydessa
spp. A, B, Tydessa lewisi (Pic); C, D, T.
sasajii sp. nov., paratype. A, C, Male;
B, D, female.
114 Yoshitomi, H.
May 30, 2016, JJSE 22 (1)
(2.78). Abdominal ventrite V (Fig. 5C) depressed in caudal
part of the surface, shallowly concave at caudal margin.
Tergite VIII (Fig. 7A) well sclerotized, trapezoidal,
shallowly concave at caudal margin, sparsely covered with
short setae. Sternite VIII (Fig. 7B) slightly sclerotized, bearing
short setae, deeply concave at caudal margin. Sternite IX
and tergite IX (Fig. 7C) membranous. Aedeagus (Fig. 6A–C)
small; basale of tegmen relatively small, shallowly concave
in basal margin; accessory lobes short, shorter than apicale
of tegmen, projecting postero-laterally in basal parts, bearing
short setae in apical parts; penis (Fig. 6D) rather short, pointed
at apex, with short basal struts.
Female (Fig. 3B). Similar to male; antennae (Fig.
5B) relatively short and stout; approximate ratio of each
antennomere (n = 1) as 1.36 : 1.09 : 1.36 : 1.27 : 1.18 : 1.00
: 1.09 : 1.09 : 1.09 : 1.00 : 1.45; pronotum (Fig. 4B) wider;
posterior pronotal pits transversal shallow concavities (Fig.
2A–C); caudal margin of abdominal ventrite V (Fig. 5D)
arcuate. HL/HW 0.59–0.78 (0.71); PW/PL 1.15–1.37 (1.27);
EL/EW 1.69–1.92 (1.78); EL/PL 3.47–4.08 (3.76); EW/PW
1.50–1.79 (1.67); TL/EW 2.47–2.86 (2.60). Tergite VIII (Fig.
7D) semicircular, bearing short setae in caudal part. Sternite
VIII (Fig. 7E) semicircular, bearing short setae in caudal part,
with long and relatively stout median strut. Ovipositor (Fig.
7F) short.
Measurements. Male (n = 11): TL 4.31–4.95 (4.61) mm;
HL 0.60–0.70 (0.63) mm; HW 0.80–1.00 (0.90) mm; PW
0.95–1.10 (1.03) mm; PL 0.78–0.90 (0.85) mm; EL 2.90–3.40
(3.13) mm; EW 1.50–1.85 (1.66) mm. Female (n = 12): TL
4.20–5.53 (4.71) mm; HL 0.50–0.78 (0.64) mm; HW 0.82–1.00
(0.90) mm; PW 0.93–1.30 (1.09) mm; PL 0.73–1.00 (0.86)
mm; EL 2.85–3.75 (3.22) mm; EW 1.60–2.10 (1.81) mm.
Distribution. Japan (Honshu, Shikoku, Kyushu); Russia
(Far East).
Remarks. Male genitalia of this species were described and
gured by Nikitsky (1986) based on the Russian specimens,
but the gures (Nikitsky, 1986, gs. 7, 8) are different from
the Japanese ones (Fig. 6A–C) by the following points:
1) basal margin of basale of tegmen arcuate; 2) accessory
lobes long and projecting parallel in basal parts. These
characteristics are not match to T. lewisi but T. sasajii sp.
nov. described in this paper. Close reexamination of Russian
populations will be required.
Biological notes. This species is mainly distributed in
mountain zone (ca 100–1,000 m in altitude) in Japan. The
adults occur from April to June, and are collected with Dasytes
spp. (family Dasytidae) having similar body size, shape, and
coloration. The adults are frequently collected from tree owers
of Prunus spp. (Nikitsky, 1986) and Acer spp., and sometimes
attracted to light trap. Nikitsky (1986) described the larva of
this species (see also Zaitsev, 2016). The larvae are found under
bark of various trees, Juglans sp., Fraxinus sp. Ulmus sp., and
thought to feed on fungal hyphae and/or decaying phoem or
bark (Nikitsky, 1986; Young and Pollock, 2010).
Tydessa sasajii sp. nov.
(Figs. 3C, 3D, 4C, 4D, 5E–H, 6E–H, 7G–L)
Tydessa sp.: Sasaji, 1986: 13.
Type series. Holotype: 1 male (TARI), “Taiwan: Pingtung
Tahanshan 07. III. 2013, leg. Y.-T. Chung”. Paratypes: 1
female (TARI), same data as for the holotype; 1 male (TARI),
same loc. and collector, but 22. II. 2007; 1 female (TARI),
same loc. and collector, but 26. II. 2013; 3 females (TARI),
same loc. and collector, but 17. III. 2014; 4 males & 5 females
(TARI, EUMJ), same loc. and collector, but 16. III. 2013;
1 female (TARI), “Taiwan: Pingtung Machia 11. III. 2013,
leg. Y.-T. Chung”; 2 females (TARI), “Taiwan: Kaoshing
Erhchituan 08. III. 2013, leg. B.-X. Guo”; 1 female (TARI),
“Taiwan: Taipei Wulai 21. II. 2010, leg. Y.-L. Lin”; 1 female
(TARI), “Taiwan: Kaoshiung Tengchih 28. III. 2015, leg. W.-
Fig. 5. Antennae (A, B, E, F) and ventrite V (C, D, G, H) of
Tydessa spp. A–D, Tydessa lewisi (Pic); E–H, T. sasajii sp. nov. A,
C, E, G, Male; B, D, F, H, female.
115
A new Tydessa from Taiwan
May 30, 2016, JJSE 22 (1)
Fig. 6. Male genitalia of Tydessa spp. A–D, Tydessa lewisi (Pic); E–H, T. sasajii sp. nov. A–C, E–G, Aedeagus in dorsal (A, E),
ventral (B, F) and left lateral (C, G) views; D, H, penis in ventral views.
116 Yoshitomi, H.
May 30, 2016, JJSE 22 (1)
C. Liao”; 1 male & 1 female (TARI), “Taiwan: Kaoshiung
Tonatrail 25. II. 2013, leg. Y.-T. Chung”; 5 males (EUMJ),
“(FORMOSA) Nanshanchi Nantou Country III-26, 1977
Yutaka Notsu leg.”; 1 female (EUMJ), “(FORMOSA) Lake
Yenyanfu Ilan Hsien 29, IV 1982 N. Ohbayashi leg.”; 1
female (EUMJ), “Nanshanchi Taiwan 16-III-1990”; 1 male
(TARI), “Nr. Liukuei Kaoshiung Hs, Taiwan 25 III 1990 W.
Chen leg.”; 1 female (EUMJ), “[TAIWAN] Siangyang, Alt.
ca 2,100–2,300m Haiduan Township, Taitung Country 7–9.
VI. 2013, J. Yamasako leg.”; 1 female (KUMJ), “Tsifeng
(2300m) Nantou Hsien Taiwan 11 V 1982, Yu, Chin-Kin leg.
(S. Osawa’s Coll.)”, “Tydessa sp. DET. H. SASAJI 198 ”,
this specimen was reported as Tydessa sp. in Sasaji (1986a);
2 males (EUMJ), “[TAIWAN] Dahan-shan (Mt.), Chunrih
Township, Pingtung Country 13. II, 2016, J. Yamasako leg.“.
Diagnosis. Body with strong bluish luster; head and
pronotum sparsely covered with short setae and punctures;
scutellar shield as long as wide; basal margin of basale of
tegmen arcuate; accessory lobes long and projecting parallel
in basal parts.
Description. Male (Fig. 3C). Body oblong, strongly shiny,
closely covered with minute silver setae. Coloration of body
black with bluish strong luster in head, pronotum and elytra;
antennomeres II–III yellowish brown in some specimens.
Head (Fig. 4C) large, with prominent eyes; HL/HW
0.65–0.79 (0.70). Antennae (Fig. 5E) long, submoniliform,
reaching at basal margin of elytra; approximate ratio of
each antennomere (n = 1) as 1.36 : 1.00 : 1.27 : 1.36 : 1.27 :
1.27 : 1.27 : 1.18 : 1.36 : 1.18 : 2.00. Posterior pronotal pits
indistinct; PW/PL 1.25–1.36 (1.30). Scutellar shield (Fig.
4C) semicircular. Elytra subparallel-sided near base to basal
1/2, widest at caudal 1/3; EL/EW 1.67–1.95 (1.82); EL/PL
Fig. 7. Male (A–C, G–I) and female (D–F, J–L) genital segments of Tydessa spp. A–F, Tydessa lewisi (Pic); G–L, T. sasajii sp. nov. A, D, G,
J, Tergite VIII; B, E, H, K, sternite VIII; C, I, sternite and tergite IX; F, L, ovipositor.
117
A new Tydessa from Taiwan
May 30, 2016, JJSE 22 (1)
3.57–4.31 (3.93); EW/PW 1.53–1.83 (1.67); TL/EW 2.47–2.85
(2.66). Abdominal ventrite V (Fig. 5G) depressed in caudal
part of the surface, shallowly concave at caudal margin.
Tergite VIII (Fig. 7G) well sclerotized, elongate trapezoidal,
arcuate at caudal margin, covered with short setae. Sternite
VIII (Fig. 7H) slightly sclerotized, bearing short setae, deeply
concave at caudal margin. Sternite IX and tergite IX (Fig. 7I)
membranous. Aedeagus (Fig. 6E–G) long and large; basale of
tegmen large, arcuate in basal margin; accessory lobes long,
as long as apicale of tegmen, projecting parallel in basal parts,
bearing long setae in apical parts; penis (Fig. 6H) long, obtuse
at apex, with relatively long basal struts.
Female (Fig. 3D). Similar to male; antennae (Fig.
5F) relatively short and stout; approximate ratio of each
antennomere (n = 1) as 1.25 : 1.00 : 1.08 : 1.17 : 1.00 : 1.08
: 1.00 : 1.00 : 1.00 : 1.00 : 1.50; pronotum (Fig. 4D) wider;
caudal margin of abdominal ventrite V (Fig. 5H) arcuate;
HL/HW 0.67–0.84 (0.74); PW/PL 1.17–1.39 (1.29); EL/EW
1.65–1.94 (1.80); EL/PL 3.61–4.10 (3.91); EW/PW 1.52–1.81
(1.69); TL/EW 2.42–2.81 (2.63). Tergite VIII (Fig. 7J)
semicircular, bearing long setae in caudal part. Sternite VIII
(Fig. 7K) semicircular, bearing long setae in caudal part, with
long and slender median strut. Ovipositor (Fig. 7L) short.
Measurements. Male (n = 11): TL 3.48–4.73 (4.14) mm;
HL 0.50–0.73 (0.58) mm; HW 0.75–0.92 (0.83) mm; PW
0.78–1.05 (0.93) mm; PL 0.60–0.82 (0.72) mm; EL 2.35–3.20
(2.83) mm; EW 1.30–1.80 (1.56) mm. Female (n = 14): TL
4.35–5.35 (4.90) mm; HL 0.60–0.80 (0.68) mm; HW 0.80–1.00
(0.92) mm; PW 1.00–1.30 (1.11) mm; PL 0.80–0.95 (0.86)
mm; EL 2.95–3.70 (3.36) mm; EW 1.60–2.00 (1.87) mm.
Remarks. This species is similar to Japanese species,
Tydessa lewisi (Pic), but distinguished from the latter by the
characteristics shown in the key.
Biological notes. This species is distributed in mountain
zone (ca 500–2,300 m in altitude) in Taiwan. The adults occur
from February to June.
Etymology. The species name is dedicated for the late Dr.
Hiroyuki Sasaji, who recognized this species rstly.
Acknowledgment
I thank Dr. Chi-Feng Lee (TARI), Dr. Munetoshi
Maruyama (KLKU), Dr. Junsuke Yamasako (University of
Tokyo), and Mr. Tomofumi Iwata (EUMJ) for supplying the
material used in this paper, and Mr. Dennis Murphy (The
United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Ehime
University) for his critical reading of the draft.
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Zaitsev, A. A., 2016. Larva of Tydessa lewisi (Pic). (Pilipalpidae).
http://www.zin.ru/animalia/coleoptera/eng/tydlewaz.htm
(access: 4 April 2016)
[Received: May 3, 2016; accepted: May 11, 2016]
Article
Part 2 of this work includes a review of morphological and systematic work on Histeridae (G07, revision), Bostrichoidea (G15), Coccinelloidea (G16), Lymexyloidea + Tenebrionoidea (G17), Cleroidea (G18), Cucujoidea (G19), Chrysomeloidea (G20) and Curculionoidea (G21), discussions of hind wing structure in each group based on 702 wing images, references to additional published figures and comments on wing morphology and, if possible, how these wing features may or may not be correlated with recent phylogenetic hypotheses. The introduction is followed by brief discussions of some important works not mentioned in Part 1, particularly those dealing with relationships of extinct taxa.
Article
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Waidelotus hoffeinsorum gen. et sp. nov. is described from Eocene Baltic amber and assigned to Waidelotinae subfam. nov. within family Pyrochroidae (Coleoptera). The new subfamily differs from the other subfamilies by the following combination of features: penultimate tarsomere of all tarsi deeply bilobed, antepenultimate tarsomere of each pro-and mesothoracic tarsus slightly bilobed, antepenultimate tarsomere of metathoracic tarsi slightly widened apically; pronotum laterally margined in basal half; eyes emarginate; pretarsal claws appendiculate; prosternal intercoxal process incompletely separating prothoracic coxae; pronotum with fine posterior submarginal groove; head without distinct constriction behind eyes; posterior pronotal pits absent; and elytral pubescence homogenous. It is the only authentic species of Pyrochroidae (Coleoptera) from Baltic amber, pending final placement of Palaeopyrochroa crowsoni Abdullah, 1965. Additionally, the available data on stratigraphy of amber-bearing strata on the Sambian peninsula, and the age and location of Eocene amberiferous forests are discussed. A middle Eocene (mostly Bartonian) age is interpreted for the extinct Central European resin-producing forests resulting in the Sambian amber deposits.
Article
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A phylogenetic analysis of the four coleopteran suborders (Polyphaga, Archostemata, Myxophaga and Adephaga), four other endoneopteran taxa (Strepsiptera, Neuropterida, Mecopterida and Hymenoptera) and three neopteran outgroups (Orthoneoptera, Blattoneoptera and Hemineoptera) is performed based on 63 characters of hind wing venation, articulation and folding patterns, with character states coded for the groundplan of each taxon (not for exemplar genera or species). The shortest tree found using Winclada with Nona exhibits the following topology: Orthoneoptera + (Blattoneoptera + (Hemineoptera + Endoneoptera: (Hymenoptera + ((Neuropterida + Mecopterida) + (Coleoptera + Strepsiptera))))). Homologization of the hind wing venation in Coleoptera is reviewed and updated, and comments are made concerning recent works on wing folding. Recent phylogenetic schemes proposed for the orders of Endoneoptera and suborders of Coleoptera are reviewed and their supporting evidence critically examined. The special role and influence of the hind wing anojugal lobe on the diversification of Neoptera and Endoneoptera is discussed. A scenario is proposed for the origin and evolution of the insect hind wing.
Article
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Based on external and internal structural features of larvae and adults, the phylogeny of Trictenotomidae, Salpingidae, Pythidae, Boridae, Tydessa Peacock (included previously in Pilipalpinae), Pilipalpinae, Pyrochroinae, and Pedilinae is reconstructed as: (Trictenotomidae + Salpingidae + Pythidae) + (Boridae + {Tydessa + [Pilipalpinae + (Pyrochroinae + Pedilinae)]}). The genus Tydessa is placed in its own monobasic subfamily, Tydessinae. Both Tydessinae and Pilipalpinae are included in Pyrochroidae, along with Pyrochroinae, Pedilinae, and possibly Cononotus and Agnathus. A historical account of the classification of Pilipalpinae is presented, along with a revised subfamilial classification of Pyrochroidae and Pythidae.
Article
Full-text available
A survey is made of the major features of the venation, articulation, and folding in the hind wings of Coleoptera. The documentation is based upon examination of 108 Coleoptera families and 200 specimens, and shown in 101 published figures. Wing veins and articular sclerites are homologized with elements of the neopteran wing groundplan, resulting in wing vein terminology that differs substantially from that generally used by coleopterists. We tabulate the differences between currently used venational nomenclature and the all-pterygote homologous symbols. The use of the neopteran groundplan, combined with the knowledge of the way in which veins evolved, provides many strong characters linked to the early evolutionary radiation of Coleoptera. The order originated with the development of the apical folding of the hind wings under the elytra executed by the radial and medial loop. The loops, which are very complex venational structures, further diversified in four distinctly different ways which mark the highest (suborder) taxa. The remaining venation and the wing articulation have changed with the loops, which formed additional synapomorphies and autapomorphies at the suborder, superfamily, and sometimes even family and tribe levels. Relationships among the four currently recognized suborders of Coleoptera are reexamined using hind wing characters. The number of wing-related apomorphies are 16 in Coleoptera, seven in Archostemata + Adephaga–Myxophaga, four in Adephaga–Myxophaga, seven in Myxophaga, nine in Archostemata, and five in Polyphaga. The following phylogenetic scheme is suggested: Polyphaga [Archostemata (Adephaga + Myxophaga)]. Venational evidence is given to define two major lineages (the hydrophiloid and the eucinetoid) within the suborder Polyphaga. The unique apical wing folding mechanism of beetles is described. Derived types of wing folding are discussed, based mainly on a survey of recent literature. A sister group relationship between Coleoptera and Strepsiptera is supported by hind wing evidence.
Article
Dasytes lewisi Pic is transferred from the Melyridae (Cleroidea) to a new genus in the Pyrochroidae (Cucujoidea), forming the new combination Tydessa lewisi (Pic).
Article
The family Pythidae is defined on adult and larval characters to include the subfamilies Pythinae and PllipalPlnae. Trachelostenidae stat.n. is excluded. Relationships of Pythidae, Boridae, Trictenotomidae and SalPlngidae (s.l.) are analysed. Strong resemblances between some PllipalPlnae and Pyrochroidae appear to have arisen through convergent evolution. Adults and larvae of the New Zealand genera Techmessa, Techmessodes and Exocalopus are described. In Scraptiidae, adults of the New Zealand genera Nothotelus and Phytilea, and the larva of Nothotelus, are described. Type data are given for all described New Zealand species of these families. The following new synonymies are established: PllipalPlnae (Abdullah, 1964)=Techmessinae Paulus, 1971. Exocalopus pectinatus Broun, 1893=nitidiceps Broun, 1910. Techmessa concolor Bates, 1874=attenuata Broun, 1893=rugicollis Broun, 1910=unicolor Paulus, 1971. Techmessa telephoroides Bates, 1874=varians Broun, 1893. Techmessodes Plcticornis (Broun, 1880)=distans (Sharp, 1882). Techmessodes versicolor Broun, 1893=cephalotes Broun, 1910. The following genera are reassigned to the families indicated: Ischyomius to Trictenotomidae (from Pythidae or Melandryidae). Phytilea to Scraptiidae (from Oedemeridae or Anthicidae). Pseudananca to Aderidae (from Oedemeridae). Scraptogetus (=Metasclera) to Aderidae (from Scraptiidae, Oedemeridae or Anthicidae).
Larva of Tydessa lewisi (Pic). (Pilipalpidae)
  • A A Zaitsev
Zaitsev, A. A., 2016. Larva of Tydessa lewisi (Pic). (Pilipalpidae). http://www.zin.ru/animalia/coleoptera/eng/tydlewaz.htm (access: 4 April 2016) [Received: May 3, 2016; accepted: May 11, 2016]
Pars 155: Dasytidae: Dasytinae
  • M Pic
Pic, M., 1937. Pars 155: Dasytidae: Dasytinae. In Junk, W. and S. Schenkling (eds.). Coleopterorum catalogus. Volume 10. W. Junk; 130 pp.