Conference Paper

Fundamental Realization Strategies for Multi-view Specification Environments

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Abstract

All Enterprise Architecture Modeling (EAM) approaches revolve around the use of multiple, inter-related views to describe the properties of a system and its surrounding environment - that is, they are multi-view specification (MVS) approaches. However, there is still little consensus on how such modeling environments should be realized and on the pros and cons of the different fundamental design choices involved in building them. In this paper we identify the different design choices put forward in the literature, evaluate their mutual compatibility, and discuss the extent to which they scale up to large enterprise systems. Finally we present some additional choices and outline some of the key features that future multi-view modeling environments should ideally support.

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... It is visible to internal and external clients through the endpoint EP + , and behaves as a regular GraphQL endpoint. In [ATM15], the authors distinguish between projective and synthetic multi-view modeling. The projective approach assumes a pre-existing all-encompassing system model. ...
... The author wishes to thank the reviewers whose comments helped improve this paper. Some of the insightful references provided [3,4,8,11,13,18] could not be integrated due to lack of time, but will be in an extended version. ...
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1 Introduction.- 2 Transformation Systems.- 3 Specification of Properties.- 4 Development of Transformation Systems.- 5 Composition of Transformation Systems.- 6 Applications to UML Software Specifications.- 7 Conclusion.- A Partial Algebras and Their Specification.- References.
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