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The Imperative of Racially Integrating US Regions and Households

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Abstract

Various scholars have marshalled empirical and analytic support for the claims that (a) racial segregation is both a cause and effect of injustice and (b) that racial integration can ameliorate some of these injustices. Such arguments for integration are usually aimed at schools, neighborhoods, and workplaces. If the arguments for and predictions about integrating these spaces are right, then we should expand their scope to other spaces and social arrangements. This paper will deploy the arguments in favor of integration on US regions and households. After laying out the arguments and their implications, I examine how the legitimacy of resistance to these types of integration compares to public resistance to other forms of integration. The conclusion is that at least some regional and household integration will be as merited as school, neighborhood, and workplace integration.

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