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Assessing the long-term impact of truth commissions: The Chilean truth and reconciliation commission in historical persepective

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Abstract

In 1990, after the end of the Pinochet regime, the newly-elected democratic government of Chile established a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) to investigate and report on some of the worst human rights violations committed under the seventeen-year military dictatorship. The Chilean TRC was one of the first truth commissions established in the world. This book examines whether and how the work of the Chilean TRC contributed to the transition to democracy in Chile and to subsequent developments in accountability and transformation in that country. The book takes a long term view on the Chilean TRC asking to what extent and how the truth commission contributed to the development of the transitional justice measures that ensued, and how the relationship with those subsequent developments was established over time.It argues that, contrary to the views and expectations of those who considered that the Chilean TRC was of limited success, that the Chilean TRC has, in fact, over the longer term, played a key role as an enabler of justice and a means by which ethical and institutional transformation has occurred within Chile. With the benefit of this historical perspective, the book concludes that the impact of truth commissions in general needs to be carefully reviewed in light of the Chilean experience. This book will be of great interest and use to students and scholars of conflict resolution, criminal international law, and comparative legal systems in Latin America.
August 2016: 234x156: 258pp
Hb: 978-0-415-72952-9 | £95.00
Pb: 978-1-138-21521-4 | £34.99
eBook: 978-1-315-81449-0
Now available in paperback!
Assessing the
Long-Term Impact of
Truth Commissions
The Chilean Truth and Reconciliation
Commission in Historical Perspective
Anita Ferrara, Centre for Transitional Justice and
Development (CTJD), Rome, Italy
In 1990, after the end of the Pinochet regime, the
newly-elected democratic government of Chile established
a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) to investigate
and report on some of the worst human rights violations
committed under the seventeen-year military dictatorship.
The Chilean TRC was one of the first truth commissions
established in the world.
Hb: 978-0-415-72952-9 | £95.00
Pb: 978-1-138-21521-4 | £34.99
For more details, or to request a copy for review, please contact: Soundus Zahir, Marketing
Assistant, soundus.zahir@tandf.co.uk
For more information visit:
www.routledge.com/9781138215214
... For discussion on transitional justice mechanisms in Latin America, see AnitaFerrara (2014), Elin Skaar, Siri Gloppen and Astri Suhrke(2005). 3 Verdoolaege argues that the South African TRC constructed a 'reconciliation dis course', which had long-lasting implications on the recovery of South African society. ...
... Wallace 1996. 22. Dixon 2018Edwards 2016;Ferrara 2015;Gillis 1994;Suny 2015;Wagner-Pacifici and Schwartz 1991;Zubrzycki and Woźny 2020. 23. ...
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