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Computer Interfaces Can Stimulate or Undermine Students’ Ability to Think

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  • Incaa Designs
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Abstract

Computer input capabilities, such as a keyboard or pen, substantially influence basic cognitive abilities, including our ability to produce appropriate ideas, solve problems correctly, and make accurate inferences about information. Compared with keyboard interfaces, computer input tools that can be used to express information involving different representations, modalities, and linguistic codes—or expressively powerful interfaces—can directly stimulate human thought and performance. This chapter summarizes how and why the quality of a computer interface matters. It also discusses implications for establishing a new generation of digital tools that are far better at supporting thinking and reasoning, with special implications for designing more effective educational technologies.

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Digital screen is the main pattern of the digital revolution. Around the world schools and universities, changes printed pages in favour of digital screens, creating innovative platforms for learning and assessment methodologies, however many others keep the traditional approaches of teaching and printed textbooks. The new paradigm of learning is focused on development the vital competence for sustainability. Although educational system has been opened by the globalisation, the diversity of digital screens is a big challenge for this process. How digital affects the opening process of the educational system and, therefore, changes the behaviour? This scientific question inspired the ideas presented in this chapter. The aim of this chapter is to compare the features of digital screen with the intention of multiliteracies’ learning.
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