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The art of packaging: An investigation into the role of color in packaging, marketing, and branding

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The art of packaging: An investigation into the role of color in packaging, marketing, and branding

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The purpose of this study is to contribute to the existing research in the field of packaging and marketing and shed more light on the psychology of colors and their effect on packaging and marketing. Nowadays, packaging is proved to be one of the significant factors in the success of promoting product sale. However, there is a perceived gap with respect to the different aspects of packaging, in particular the graphics, design, and color of packaging. The current study provides a comprehensive overview of packaging. It elaborates on different aspects of packaging and summarizes the findings of the most recent research conducted to date probing into packaging from different perspectives. It also discusses the role of color, i.e., the psychology of colors, and graphics in packaging and product sale. It is argued that graphics and color play key roles in promoting product sale and designers and marketers should attach a great deal of importance to color in packaging. The implications for producers, marketers, practitioners, and researchers are discussed in detail and suggestions for future research are provided.
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International Journal of Organizational Leadership 3(2014) 92-102
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF
ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP
WWW.AIMIJOURNAL.COM
INDUSTRIAL
MANAGEMENT
INSTITUTE
The art of packaging: An investigation into
the role of color in packaging, marketing,
and branding
Behzad Mohebbi
University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran
ABSTRACT
Keywords:
Packaging, Marketing,
Branding, Color,
Psychology of Colors
The purpose of this study is to contribute to the existing research in the field of packaging
and marketing and shed more light on the psychology of colors and their effect on packaging
and marketing. Nowadays, packaging is proved to be one of the significant factors in the
success of promoting product sale. However, there is a perceived gap with respect to the
different aspects of packaging, in particular the graphics, design, and color of packaging. The
current study provides a comprehensive overview of packaging. It elaborates on different
aspects of packaging and summarizes the findings of the most recent research conducted to
date probing into packaging from different perspectives. It also discusses the role of color,
i.e., the psychology of colors, and graphics in packaging and product sale. It is argued that
graphics and color play key roles in promoting product sale and designers and marketers
should attach a great deal of importance to color in packaging. The implications for
producers, marketers, practitioners, and researchers are discussed in detail and suggestions
for future research are provided.
Correspondence:
mohebi_behzad@yahoo.com
©AIMI Journals
Introduction
Nowadays, the strategic role of comprehensive development in flourishing of a society is
highlighted. To achieve this development, managers need to take advantage of all potential
tools. One of the main indicators of success in international markets is paying close attention
to marketing, in particular packaging. Today, in line with the basic aim of packaging, which
is keeping the product safe and making the transportation easy, packaging is considered as an
93 B. Mohebbi / International Journal of Organizational Leadership 3(2014) 92-102
effective advertising tool which would promote sale. The importance of this field of graphics
is to the extent that in some countries which are not producer, they take advantage of
effective packaging for imported goods which put their names as the producer and exporter of
the product. Surprisingly enough, 70 per cent of all brand and purchase decisions are made
in-store at the moment of buying, even if a consumer enters a store with the intention of
purchasing specific products based on a shopping list (Kauppinen-Räisänen, 2014). So,
packaging, without a shadow of doubt, exerts a significant impact on consumers' decision at
the point of purchase.
There is now a growing consensus among researchers and practitioners in the field of
marketing and business that packaging plays a pivotal role in the success or failure of sale of
any product in the highly competitive market. It is evident that companies in order to
outperform their leading competitors need to invest effort and money in product
differentiation; to this end, product packaging is one of the most effective and market-
oriented strategies which companies can adopt (Stoll, Baecke, & Kenning, 2008). However,
there is a gap in the literature examining packaging from different perspectives, in particular
the factors such as the color of packaging which exert an impact on its effectiveness. This
study presents an investigation into the status quo of packaging research through
summarizing the findings of the most recent studies conducted in this field and the effect of
the art of packaging and color on the success of product sale.
The remainder of this article is organized as follows. Firstly, we discuss the status quo of
packaging; then, we elaborate on the findings of the most recent studies conducted to date
investigating packaging. This is followed by a discussion about the role of graphics in
packaging, in particular color and color psychology and its contribution to packaging. After
this, the implications of this study is discussed in detail as well as conclusions and potential
directions and suggestions for further research in the field of packaging and marketing.
Packaging: The State-of-the-art
By and large, packaging plays a crucial role in product success, especially in the fast moving
consumer goods industry and exercises a significant effect on consumers' buying decisions
(Simms & Trott, 2010). In fact, changes in retailing and marketing have given packaging a
central role in large and well-developed industry in emerging consumer society (Porter,
1999). It is observed that most of consumers make their purchase decision at the store shelf;
B. Mohebbi / International Journal of Organizational Leadership 3(2014) 92-102 94
this evidence highlights the immense importance of packaging in affecting consumers' point-
of-purchase decisions (Underwood & Ozanne, 1998).
In fact, until the end of the nineteenth century, in majority of sectors of economy of USA
packaging was limited to simply tying up a parcel with wrapping paper and string (Porter,
1999). Packaging received paramount importance since the 1950s when self-service retailing
was burgeoning (Kauppinen-Räisänen, 2014). Unfortunately, traditionally, packaging design
was given a subordinate and minor role with regard to production systems design and product
design (Azzi, Battini, Persona, & Sgarbossa, 2012). In a similar vein, as Simms and Trott
(2014) rightly stress, packaging has received little attention in marketing and there is a lack of
robust theory in this field of study.
The functions which packaging is required to perform are fundemental, complex, and
manifold (Hellström & Saghir, 2007). Packaging is intimately related to marketing
communications, logistics and distribution management, sustainable marketing, and branding
(Simms & Trott, 2010). In fact, packaging serves three main communication functions,
namely communication of information including content, destination, and means of handling,
promoting the product, and enahancing communication with consumers (Hellström & Saghir,
2007).
Precisely speaking, packaging serves key roles and functions in enhancing marketing.
Silayoi and Speece (2007) summed up the main packaging elements which potentially exert
influence on consumers' buying decision, including visual and informational elements; the
visual elements relate to graphics and color and size or shape of packaging and informational
elements consist of information about the product and the technologies used in the package.
More recently, Simms and Trott (2014), based on the studies conducted examining different
aspects of packaging, summarized concisely the key roles and functions of packaging. Table
1 presents these key roles and functions of packaging.
Given the importance of packaging, for instance, for perishable foods, packaging informs
consumers about allergy, nutritional preferences, or even discounts; also, the freshness of a
perishable product can be read-out from the information provided in packaging (Heising,
Dekker, Bartels, & Van Boekel, 2014). For perishable foods, intelligent packaging can be
used which "monitors conditions of food during its life cycle to communicate information
related to the quality of the product" and as well as "contains sensors or indicators to estimate
and communicate quality of a food product to user" (p.645).
95 B. Mohebbi / International Journal of Organizational Leadership 3(2014) 92-102
Table 1
The Key Roles and Functions of Packaging (Adapted from Simms & Trott, 2014)
Key roles and functions Elements of packaging's role
Protection
- Effects on the supply chain
- Tamperproof
- Role in transportation and logistics
- Product safety and quality
Containment
- Preservation/shelf-life of the product
- Protection from hazards: mechanical, chemical;
environmental; climatic; bacteriological
- Aids customers use of product
- Containing and holding product
- Quantity/amount
- Facilitating/convenience handling
- Affect on quality
- Compatibility and constraints
Identification
- Product identification
- Labeling (effective)
- Information: Copy/illustrations on use
Marketing communication
- Supporting marketing communications
- Supporting promotion of other products
- Sales/marketing
- Positioning
Cost - Transport and storage costs
- Process cost implications
User convenience
- Openability/access
- Reclosability
- Carrying
- Dispensing facilities
- Affecting consumer value
- New solutions
- Consumer convenience
Market appeal
- Suitable quantity/format
- Consumer and market appeal
- Branding
- Reinforcing the product concept
- Ability to improve sales
- Facilitating commercialization
Innovation - Innovation and technology
Although the effeciency and primary importance of packaging is neglected in developing
countries and non-competitive markets, but the value of packaging market is a multi-billion
dollar business which mainly belongs to the developed and industrialized countries. Given e-
commerce and online sales servise via Internet through companies such as eBay and Amazon,
salespersons and venders are to lose their important and key roles in promoting sale; this
circumstances leads producers, experts, and practitioners of marketing and business to focus
on the key role of packaging in fostering product sale. In modern sale systems, packaging,
which is commonly employed and advocated in developed and industrialized countries, is
B. Mohebbi / International Journal of Organizational Leadership 3(2014) 92-102 96
one of the most important factors in promoting sale due to the fact that in these systems the
closest relationship of a consumer with a product is not through salespersons but through the
packaging. It is crystal clear that poor graphics and design of packagaing would have
detrimental effects on consumers' attitudes and lead to poor sales performance.
As already mentioned, there is a lack of comprehensive theory in marketing, in particular
packaging. To bridge this gap, Simms and Trott (2014) based on a grounded theory
methodology provided a new understanding of how a new product's packaging is managed
effectively and integrated into the new Product Development Process (NPD). The original
version of this grounded framework of management of packaging in NPD is accessible
through http://www.emeraldinsight.com/action/showImage?doi=10.1108%2FEJM-12-2012-
0733&iName=master.img-001.jpg&type=master.
It is also clear that in line with packaging, branding, also, is "among a company's most
priceless assets" (Hernández, 2011, p. 369) which results in band equity which is the value a
brand name adds to the product. Packaging and branding, taken together, have the potential to
position producers and companies at a vantage point against their competitors in highly
competitive market through enhancing the consumer likelihood to purchase a product. In
actual fact, consumers' responses to the design and color of packaging is assumed to be
converted into brand preference; simply put, the decision to opt for a brand is based on
aesthetics of packaging (Kauppinen-Räisänen, 2014).
In the same line of argument, it is imperative to mention that packaging exerts a crucial
influence on two key factors, namely brand equity and consumer loyalty which would result
in prompting successful marketing (Aurier & de Lanauze, 2012).
Silayoi and Speece (2007) argue that "the package becomes a critical factor in the
consumer decision-making process because it communicates to consumers at the time they
are actually deciding in the store" (p.1496). They also go as far as to claim that the way
consumers perceive the subjective entity of produces they want to purchase, as represented
through graphics, color, design, and communication elements in the package, exercise an
impact on their choice and is regarded as a key to succeed in product marketing strategies.
In the most recent study, Ryynänen and Rusko (in press) investigated the professionals'
view of consumers' packaging interactions. They concluded that "By understanding the
phenomena in the everyday lives of consumers, companies can develop packaging that goes
hand in hand with consumers’ lives and practices. In this view, packaging is the consumers’
partner in using the product, not a disconnected medium for sending messages" (p. 13). They
97 B. Mohebbi / International Journal of Organizational Leadership 3(2014) 92-102
also claimed that "For the consumer, well-designed packaging means functional and pleasing
experiences that are seamlessly integrated into everyday life. Successful consumer-centered
packaging development can benefit a company by creating a competitive advantage,
increasing customer satisfaction and boosting sales volumes" (p. 13).
The Role of Graphics and Color
Color is an excellent source of information as much as it is estimated that 62-90 per cent of
persons' assessments and evaluations is based on colors alone (Singh, 2006). Colors have
dramatic and profound effect on consumers' thoughts, feelings, and behaviors; so, marketers
have long employed color as a visual mnemonic device to support cognition and thought and
grasp consumers' attention (Labrecque, Patrick, & Milne, 2013). As Odekerken-Schröder,
Ouwersloot, Lemmink, and Semeijn, (2003) rightly stress when consumers want to make a
purchase, they usually take several factors and dimensions into account. There is a consensus
among marketing scientists and managers that product form or design and product aesthetics
are indispensable tools to gain competitive advantage in competitive market (Kreuzbauer &
Malter, 2005). As Kauppinen-Räisänen (2014) argues, "one means of capturing discerning
consumers is through the strategic use of visual cues" (p. 663). She goes as far as to claim
that packaging design is a strategic brand issue which should be attached primary importance
in marketing.
Visual stimuli on packaging attract consumers' attention and leads consumers to form
perceptions of various products; these perceptions significantly exercise influence on
consumers' buying decision (Venter et al., 2011). Graphics and color are decisive factors in
affecting consumers' purchase decision which producers and marketing experts should not
turn a blind eye to them in packaging. Graphics includes image layout, color combinations,
typography, and product photography (Silayoi & Speece, 2007).
Accordingly, it is observed that extrinsic product cues, namely packaging color is
influential in buying decision, in particular consumers who are in hurry, which is typical in
today's hectic life style, rely on packaging color and design in making purchase decisions
(Kauppinen-Räisänen, 2014).
As a matter of fact, researchers, designers, and producers should not ignore attention-
capturing attributes of packaging. It is evident that consumers' first impression is based on the
packaging, especially the graphics and color. An eye-catching graphics and color would
result in lasting effect on consumers' purchase decision. In fact, attractiveness, which can be
B. Mohebbi / International Journal of Organizational Leadership 3(2014) 92-102 98
obtained through graphics and color, at the point of buying plays a key role in getting brand
choice (Silayoi & Speece, 2007).
Kauppinen-Räisänen (2014) rightly asserts that the multifarious and multiple functions of
packaging colors, particularly how colors attract consumers' attention and plays an influential
role in affecting perceptions at the point of buying is under-researched area of investigation in
the field of packaging and marketing.
Based on the studies conducted to date examining packaging color, it is concluded that
consumers take advantage of colors as stimulus-based information and packaging color
captures consumers' attention, affects preferential judgments, and has the ability to
communicate the information about the product at the point of purchase (Kauppinen-
Räisänen, 2014).
In her most recent research, Kauppinen-Räisänen (2014) provides a framework which
indicates the functions of packaging color at the point of purchase. Figure 1 presents this
framework.
Figure 1. Packaging colors' functions at the point of purchase (Adapted from Kauppinen-Räisänen, 2014).
As Figure 1 clearly exhibits, the framework takes into consideration the three main
functions of packaging color, including voluntary or involuntary attention, aesthetics, and
communication. Interestingly enough, packaging colors exercise an influence on emotions
and the responses and reactions to packaging color can be unconscious and innate,
semiconscious based on cultural factors, or conscious under the influence of personal
preferences based on personal experiences (Kauppinen-Räisänen, 2014).
99 B. Mohebbi / International Journal of Organizational Leadership 3(2014) 92-102
Silayoi and Speece (2007), employing a conjoint analysis approach, examined the
importance of packaging attributes. Based on the data obtained and the analysis, they argued
that the most effective packaging is required to have a technology image conveying clearly
convenience and ease of use; provide the information of product clearly and
comprehensively; and have more classic and traditional graphic design, colors, and shape.
Bix, Seo, and Sundar (2013) studied the impact of color contrast on consumers' attentive
behaviors and found that simultaneous contrast of colors significantly affects the attentive
behaviors of consumers, their perception of quality of the product, visual appeal, and
purchase intention.
As already mentioned, visual elements, namely graphics and color, placement of visual
elements, and packaging size and shape are among the determining factors enhancing product
sale. Given packaging color and its undeniable role in affecting consumers' purchase
decision, researchers and practitioners need to focus on psychology of colors and color
preferences of consumers which are context and culture-specific. The findings of research
into color preferences indicate that color preferences are intimately related to determining
factors such as age and gender, personality, and ethnicity and religion (Kauppinen-Räisänen,
2014).
In other words, similarly, it is argued that " the perception and application of color is
strongly influenced by ones innate physiological and psychological predisposition, personal
experiences, age, gender, personality, income, ethnographic and demographic" (Singh &
Srivastava, 2011, p. 199).
In brief, it is imperative to stress that colors are of primary importance in persons' daily
life and especially in marketing, branding, packaging, and product sale. Table 2 summarizes
the connotations and significance of different colors in daily life and particularly in marketing
based on Singh and Srivastava (2011).
By and large, packaging designers are required to take advantage of colors' connotations in
designing packaging and combining different colors to attract consumers' attention in making
purchase decision. For instance, Crowley (1993) claimed that designers can use more
activating colors such as red and blue to engage consumers in impulse buying. So, it should
be highlighted that selecting the right colors and artistic and psychological combination and
design of them in packaging would prompt product sale dramatically.
B. Mohebbi / International Journal of Organizational Leadership 3(2014) 92-102 100
Table 2
The Connotations of Colors in Daily Life and Marketing
Color Connotation
Red celebration, purity, passion, strength, energy, fire, love, excitement, speed, heat, arrogance,
ambition, leadership, masculinity, power, danger, blood, war, anger, revolution, and communalism
Blue depression, tranquility, trust, confidence, conservatism, dependability, wisdom, wealth royalty,
truthfulness, and creativity
Green growth, rebirth, renewal, nature, fertility, youth, good luck, generosity, health, abundance, stability,
and creative intelligence
Yellow sunlight, joy, earth, optimism, intelligence, hope, liberalism, wealth, dishonesty, weakness, greed,
decay aging, feminity, gladness, sociability and friendship
White youth, sterility, light, reverence, truth, snow, air, cleanliness, coldness, fearfulness and humility
Black absence, rebellion, modernity, power, sophistication, formality, elegance, mystery, style, evil,
emptiness, darkness, seriousness, conventionality, unity, sorrow, professionalism, and sleekness
Gray elegance, respect, reverence, wisdom, old-age, pessimism, boredom, decay, dullness, urban sprawl,
intense emotions, balance, mourning, and neutrality
Orange energy, heat, fire, playfulness, gaudiness, arrogance, warning, danger, desire, royalty, and religious
ceremonies and rituals
Brown calmness, boldness, depth, natural organisms, richness, tradition, heaviness, poverty, dullness,
roughness, steadfastness, simplicity, dependability, friendliness and aids in stimulating appetite and
is popularly used for advertising various bakery products, chocolates, foods and flavors
Pink gratitude, appreciation, admiration, sympathy, socialism, health,
feminity, love, marriage, joy, innocence, flirtatiousness, childlike behavior and symbolizes sweet
taste
Purple nobility, humility, spirituality, ceremony, mystery, wisdom, enlightenment, flamboyance,
exaggeration, sensuality, pride, and lavender essence
Indigo spirituality and intuition
Violet elegance, grace and artistic creativity
Magenta artistic creativity
Rose optimism, hope and love and used in advertising to signify rosy flavors
Concluding Remarks and Suggestions for Future Research
The present study contributes to a growing body of research investigating the effect of
packaging and the role of different mediating factors such as graphics, design, and color
which contribute to the success of branding and marketing. Future researchers in this field of
inquiry, as Azzi, Battini, Persona, and Sgarbossa (2012) rightly concluded, should focus on
identifying methods and procedures for an integrated and systematic packaging design and
take into account various variables which exert influence on packaging. Kauppinen-Räisänen
(2014) highlights that marketers need to be "alert to the wide-ranging effects and functions of
packaging and packaging colors" (p. 670).
101 B. Mohebbi / International Journal of Organizational Leadership 3(2014) 92-102
Further research is welcomed investigating the issues related to packaging color, in
particular color aesthetics, color communication or meanings expressed by colors, color
attention, color properties, and the inter-relationships between the different color functions
and roles in different contexts and cultures. Also, as Singh (2006) mentions, future studies are
advised to examine the effect of cool and warm and dim and bright colors on product sale.
In future research it will be of interest to study the impact of cultural and social
differences' effect on packaging color and design, branding, marketing, and more importantly
product acceptance and sale. It is evident that products do not exist in a vacuum; hence, it is
argued that branding, marketing, and packaging require placing a physical entity, i.e., the
product, into socio-culturally constructed world of symbols, signs, signifiers, and more
importantly contexts of consumption in which the product is advertised, sold, purchased, and
used (Verma, 2013).
Another potential area for future study could focus on more holistic packaging approach
through considering multifunction of packaging to avoid negative trade-offs (Hellström &
Saghir, 2007). In the same vein, further studies, as Hellström & Saghir (2007) rightly call for,
are expected to adopt a systems-oriented approach towards the evaluation of packaging
concepts and the factors which have an impact of packaging. Additionally, one further
research goal that can be pursued in future research is to investigate consumer response to
packaging through longitudinal and qualitative research.
Also, researchers can inquire into the possible roles of intelligent packaging and the
barriers to implement this kind of technology in packaging (Heising, Dekker, Bartels, & Van
Boekel, 2014). Moreover, future researchers in this field of study can examine the
combination of art and technology and its effectiveness on prompting marketing, packaging,
and product sale. Further research into designing and implementing environmentally friendly
and sustainable packaging should be conducted to offer strategies to be implemented in
design of packaging to avoid packaging waste and contamination from packaging (Scott &
Vigar-Ellis, 2014).
In brief, Elliot and Maier (2007) concluded that psychology of color, the functions of
color, and assessment and calibration of lightness, chroma, and hue "is a highly promising
research area in which many pressing questions await empirical consideration" (p. 253).
In a nutshell, it is hoped that the present study would serve as a stimulus for future and
more in-depth research into packaging and the variables involved in its success, in particular
the graphics, color, and design.
B. Mohebbi / International Journal of Organizational Leadership 3(2014) 92-102 102
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... Packaging plays an important role in commercializing any product, especially in the consumer-packed goods industry, and significantly affects consumers' buying decisions (Mohebbi 2014). Various commercial packaging products are cartons, films, paperboards, containers, corrugated film boards, kraft bags, etc. Molded pulp packaging is in huge demand due to its environmental advantages and is synthesized by fibrous materials like recycled paper and natural fibers. ...
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This paper explores the little-known issue of the functions of packaging colours, specifically how colours help to capture consumers' attention and affect perceptions at the point of purchase. By surveying colour-related research, the study makes a first attempt to highlight the multifarious nature and multiple functions of packaging colour. The study also develops a theoretical base and proposes a framework that incorporates the functions of packaging colours and their inter-relationships. By having this approach, the study contributes to the field in terms of summarizing the existing knowledge and pointing out gaps in knowledge and avenues for future research. In addition, the study highlights aspects for marketers and managers to consider in their attempts to develop brand identity. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. LINK TO the ABSTRACT: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pts.2061/abstract PREVIEW: http://www.readcube.com/articles/10.1002%2Fpts.2061?r3_referer=wol&tracking_action=preview_click&show_checkout=1
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