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Cronología de la cultura Chupícuaro : Estudio del sitio La Tronera, Puruaguita, Guanajuato

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... It begins in the Middle to Late Formative period with the appearance of settlements along what was likely an early shoreline of the southeastern end of Lake Cuitzeo (Sites 6, 9, and 10 in Figure 2). Ceramic materials recovered from the lowest levels of stratified deposits at these sites consist of thick-walled, well-polished monochrome and painted vessels and figurines consistent with the Chupícuaro ceramic complex described by Porter (1956), Florance (1985,1989), , and Darras and Faugère (2005) from pottery recovered from surface survey, household excavations, and burials located within the Puroagüita region of southern Guanajuato some 25 km east of the UZ source area (Figure 1). ...
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Mi aportación al presente volumen colectivo consiste en la elaboración de un análisis sintético de la prehistoria e historia temprana de los grupos indígenas que tienen una presencia histórica en el Centro-Norte de México, abordando la época Prehispánica y principios de la Novohispana. Me enfocaré en la región conocida como el Bajío, en el sur de lo que hoy es el sur del estado de Guanajuato, el poniente del estado de Querétaro, el norte de Michoacán y el oriente de Jalisco. Cuando sea pertinente, ampliaré este marco geográfico para incluir las regiones vecinas donde se dieron procesos culturales e históricos vinculados a los del Bajío. Esta tarea me obliga a trabajar desde una perspectiva transdisciplinaria, aprovechando los estudios previos realizados por arqueólogos, lingüistas, historiadores y etnohistoriadores, entre otras disciplinas científicas. Espero que los resultados sean útiles para los lectores que desean conocer las raíces profundas de los indígenas guanajuatenses.
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