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Abstract

Few well-defined, evidence-based nutritional recommendations for people with skin diseases have been published in the scientific literature and standard dermatological textbooks. Using a systematic review of acne vulgaris as an example, the aim of this study was to determine whether there are systematic studies on the topic and, if so, of what quality. Four evidence levels were defined: (A) double-blind randomized study; (B) randomized study with serious limitations/low number of cases; (C) case-control or cohort study; and (D) expert opinion/case report. PubMed and Cochrane searches were performed using combinations of the terms "diet", "nutrition", "meal" and "food" with "acne". Foodstuffs mentioned in relevant articles were subdivided by evidence level and recorded as having a beneficial (+), neutral (0) or adverse (-) effect. However, only a small proportion of studies met sufficiently high scientific standards that would enable therapeutic recommendations to be made in practice.
Acta Derm Venereol 2017; 97: 7–9
This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC license. www.medicaljournals.se/acta
Journal Compilation © 2017 Acta Dermato-Venereologica. ISSN 0001-5555
doi: 10.2340/00015555-2450
SPECIAL REPORT
7
Few well-dened, evidence-based nutritional recom-
mendations for people with skin diseases have been
publish ed in the scientic literature and standard der-
matological textbooks. Using a systematic review of
acne vulgaris as an example, the aim of this study was
to determine whether there are systematic studies
on the topic and, if so, of what quality. Four eviden-
ce levels were dened: (A) double-blind randomized
study; (B) randomized study with serious limitations/
low number of cases; (C) case-control or cohort study;
and (D) expert opinion/case report. PubMed and Co-
chrane searches were performed using combinations
of the terms “diet”, “nutrition”, “meal” and “food”
with “acne”. Foodstuffs mentioned in relevant artic-
les were subdivided by evidence level and recorded as
having a benecial (+), neutral (0) or adverse (–) ef-
fect. How ever, only a small proportion of studies met
sufciently high scientic standards that would enable
therapeutic recommendations to be made in practice.
Key words: nutrition; acne; evidence level; overview.
Accepted Apr 28, 2016; Epub ahead of print May 3, 2016
Acta Derm Venereol 2017; 97: 7–9.
Corr: Friederike Fiedler, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Mar-
tin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Kromayer-Str. 5, DE-06112
Halle (Saale), Germany. E-mail: friederike.edler@halle-hautarzt.de
Patients often ask about the effects of nutrition on acne,
but current research into this topic is very limited
compared with that of high-quality drug studies. One of
the main reasons for lack of research into nutrition and
acne is the high cost of appropriate studies, since, unlike
for medications, the expected efcacy is low and there
is a lack of options for increasing the price of foods to
nance research. Nonetheless, several nutritional studies
of various qualities have been published during the past
few decades. However, very few high-quality studies
meeting modern standards have been performed, and
those that have involve only a small proportion of the
wide range of foods available (1, 2). Some studies were
performed several years ago and, from today’s view-
point, have design aws that would not allow dietary
recommendations to be made (3). The number of food
items that could be included in a meta-analysis is limited
because there is no, or not good enough, evidence about
many food items (1). An overview of all the foods that
inuence a specic disease, stratied by evidence level,
could support clinicians as well as researchers. Using a
systematic review of acne vulgaris as an example, the
aim of this study was to determine whether there are
systematic studies on the topic and, if so, of what quality.
METHODS
PubMed and Cochrane searches were performed with the search
terms “nutrition”, “diet”, “meal”, “food”, each in combination
with “acne”. The hits were then examined for relevant articles
using pre-dened criteria. Initially, the timeframe for the sample
search was limited to 11 years (Cochrane; 2004–2014) and 6 years
(PubMed; 2004–2009)1, respectively. Articles were classed as
relevant if foodstuffs, vitamins, trace elements, certain diets, food
forms, alcohol and nicotine were studied, or at least mentioned,
as inuencing factors in the skin disease, and an effect was rated
benecial/neutral/adverse. Furthermore, only studies of per os
administration in humans, but no studies of topical application,
cell culture or animal experiments were considered. All foods
with the respective effect reported were listed alphabetically in
a table and assessed by evidence level. The evidence level in the
Atkins and Bigby system (4, 5) was expanded to a search for
usually non-randomized studies by evidence Level D with expert
opinion or mention of the food. Otherwise, Level A corresponds
to randomized double-blind studies with a high number of cases,
Level B to randomized studies with serious limitations or a low
number of cases, and Level C to case-control or cohort studies.
Within each of the 4 evidence levels, adverse (–), neutral (0) or
benecial (+) effects were differentiated into a corresponding total
of 12 groups. The results are summarized for each food as a row
in a table and illustrated by a graphical presentation with respect
to the results/evidence.
RESULTS
A total of 162/21 (PubMed/Cochrane) hits for acne were
found in the study timeframe, of which 58/6 relevant
articles on acne could be assessed based on the selec-
tion criteria (for a complete reference list in alphabetical
order, see Appendix S1
2
). Higher grade studies (evidence
Levels A and B) were rarely found, while mentions of
foods (evidence Level D) formed a clear majority.
Acne and Nutrition: A Systematic Review
Friederike FIEDLER
1
, Gabriele I. STANGL
2
, Eckhard FIEDLER
1#
and Klaus-Michael TAUBE
1#
1
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, and
2
Institute of Agricultural and Nutritional Sciences, Martin Luther University Halle-
Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany
#
These authors contributed equally to this work.
1This study was part of FF’s medical doctoral thesis and thus has to reect
its results. The addition of PubMed listed papers for a further 5 years
(2010–2014) would exceed the space limitations of the medical faculty
rules for medical doctor theses; thus, only the Cochrane database search
was expanded (2004–2014).
2https://www.medicaljournals.se/acta/content/abstract/10.2340/00015555-2450
ActaDV ActaDV
Advances in dermatology and venereology Acta Dermato-Venereologica
F. Fiedler et al.8
www.medicaljournals.se/acta
For acne there were 370 mentions of 146 inuencing
foods. Evidence assessment showed none of Level A, 4
of Level B, 45 of Level C and 321 of Level D (Table I).
While several foods were mentioned only once in
connection with acne within the study timeframe, other
foods or diets were mentioned up to 22 times within
various evidence levels, sometimes with contradictory
inuence (Table II).
DISCUSSION
There are polarizing, often speculative, opinions concer-
ning the efcacy or non-efcacy of diets and foods as part
of the treatment of diseases, especially in dermatology.
This study systematically assessed the available scientic
literature with respect to the inuence of food, using acne
as an example.
In comparison with drug testing, studies on the effect
of nutrition on skin diseases have rarely been performed
at evidence Levels A or B. High-quality studies are ex-
pensive and medication studies are usually amortized
with the selling price later on, which is not possible in
the case of foods. Randomizing and controlling human
subjects and diet is extremely difcult. There are many
confounders in nutrition studies, but less so in drug
studies. Double-blind testing is very difcult because
of the shape and the taste of the food. The best way to
test would be a double-blind placebo-controlled food
challenge (DBPCFC) including blinding of colour, shape
and taste, as used in food allergy testing, but this would
substantially increase overall expenditure.
In order to include the results of survey articles on
knowledge of foods, as well as those used as remedies
in natural medicines, and older articles cited currently
during the study period, the arrangement of evidence
levels as proposed by Atkins (4) and Bigby (5) was
modied and expanded by a Level D for citations/expert
opinion/case reports. The results presented here, using
acne as an example, were selected because a connection
to nutrition is, or was, considered relatively certain by
both dermatologists and patients. In this respect, there are
a number of articles in the dened publication timeframe
that addressed the corresponding connections.
Only human studies were taken into account for the
assessment of relevance. In vitro studies were excluded in
order to limit our topic to practical relevance in nutrition.
As for other topics, the number of studies on individual
foods reveals a focus of scientic interest of often limited
timeframe. This, of course, limits the screened publica-
tion period, but, on the other hand, expanding the study
time period to 50 years or more would mean including a
number of older articles, which have serious limitations in
study structure (3, 6) according to today’s standards. This
expansion would be necessary to obtain the most complete
overview possible, but it is not appropriate in establishing
a prototype and in dening the analysis algorithm because
of the considerable effort and costs involved.
Multiple studies or mentions of a particular food in the
various evidence levels and with differing inuence in a
text often limit the clarity of presentation of the result for
the reader. Thus, a graphical presentation is provided in
addition to the tabular presentation. This enables a visual
overview based on colour and distribution between right
and left over the study situation within the 12 possible
degrees of inuence (evidence Levels A–D each with
3 categories: adverse/neutral/benecial). Like a scale,
evidence Level A, with the highest quality, is always po-
sitioned at the edge comparable to the greatest leverage.
An identical distance right or left from the middle of
the chart thus corresponds to the same evidence level,
but results with contradictory inuence (left adverse
and right benecial). The colours were borrowed from
a trafc light: red for adverse (–), yellow for neutral (0)
and green for benecial (+) inuence. Since graded as-
signment of the evidence level with neutral relationship
causes neither positive nor negative lateral shift in the
results, the neutral results were entered vertically in
yellow. Using milk in acne as an example (Fig. 1), an
adverse inuence can be observed with entered numbers
only in the left horizontal arm. In this, many results were
near the centre of the chart at the lowest evidence, Level
D; but there are also 2 corresponding results at Level C.
Another 5 citations at Level D are shown in the lower
middle, which did not cause any shift between benecial
and adverse.
For acne, 146 different foods were recorded a total
of 370 times in 60 relevant articles. There were only 49
studies with evidence Levels A–C. In these, none cor-
responded to evidence Level A, 4 cases corresponded to
Table I. Assessed foods mentions arranged by evidence levela
Level A
Σ/–/0/+
Level B
Σ/–/0/+
Level C
Σ/–/0/+
Level D
Σ/–/0/+
Acne vulgaris 0/0/0/0 4/0/1/3 45/15/28/2 321/163/70/88
aLevel A corresponds to randomized double-blind studies with a high number of
cases, Level B to randomized studies with serious limitations or a low number
of cases, Level C to case-control or cohort studies, and Level D to usually non-
randomized studies expressing expert opinion or mention of the food. Within
each of the evidence levels, adverse (–), neutral (0) or benecial (+) effects were
differentiated in a corresponding total of 12 groups. The results are summarized
for each item (bold gures).
Table II. The 10 most-frequently studied/mentioned foods (and
smoking) in the examined time-frame
Food
Total
Σ/–/0/+
Level A
–/0/+
Level B
–/0/+
Level C
–/0/+
Level D
–/0/+
Milk 22/17/5/0 0/0/0 0/0/0 2/0/0 15/5/0
Chocolate 17/7/10/0 0/0/0 0/0/0 2/0/0 6/10/0
Milk products 17/13/3/1 0/0/0 0/0/0 0/1/0 13/2/1
Western diet 14/14/0/0 0/0/0 0/0/0 0/0/0 14/0/0
Low glycaemic load 12/0/0/12 0/0/0 0/0/2 0/0/1 0/0/9
High glycaemic load 12/11/1/0 0/0/0 0/0/0 1/0/0 10/1/0
High glycaemic index 11/9/2/0 0/0/0 0/0/0 0/0/0 9/2/0
Low-fat milk 9/8/1/0 0/0/0 0/0/0 2/1/0 6/0/0
Smoking 7/1/4/2 0/0/0 0/0/0 0/2/0 1/2/2
Pizza 6/1/5/0 0/0/0 0/0/0 0/2/0 1/3/0
For explanation of evidence levels see Table I and Methods.
ActaDV ActaDV
Advances in dermatology and venereology Acta Dermato-Venereologica
9Acne and nutrition
Acta Derm Venereol 2017
Level B and 45 cases to Level C. The majority (86.7%)
corresponded to evidence Level D (assessed mention
without own study). The main impact of adverse food
effects relevant for the industrial countries in the lite-
rature studied was seen in the western diet, since the
introduction of this diet in populations whose traditional
nutrition had been different (7) resulted in a marked in-
crease in the incidence of acne. The main components
of the western diet are hyperglycaemic carbohydrates,
(cow’s) milk and saturated fats (8). The pathogenetic
effect of the western diet is mostly ascribed to the high
glycaemic load and high glycaemic index, hormonal
effects in cow’s milk and the shift in the omega-3-FA/
omega-6-FA ratio in favour of omega-6-FA (7, 9, 10). The
adverse effect of milk and glycaemic load or glycaemic
index nds broad consensus (1, 2). The role of androgen
hormones in acne is well dened. Hyperinsulinaemia and
an increased insulin growth factor 1 (IGF-1) as a result
of high glycaemic load and dairy food intake cause an
increased production of androgen hormones and sebum
associated with acne (1, 2). Overactivated nutrient- and
growth factor sensitive kinase mechanistic target of ra-
pamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and downregulation of
nuclear transcription factor FoxO1 levels induced by a
western diet increase inammation and comedogenesis
(8). High glycaemic load and hyperinsulinaemia decrease
insulin growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), which
controls cellular growth (1). The resulting stimulation of
cellular growth leads to acne.
Some older studies (3) are repeatedly cited anecdotally
because of their methodological weaknesses. No well-
designed study has been performed to address the belief
still deep-rooted in the population that chocolate has an
adverse effect on acne.
There are fewer reports on the benecial effects of
foods (n = 63, 17.0%) and adverse effects of avoidance
(n = 8, 2.2%) on acne than reports on foodstuffs with
adverse effects when consumed (n = 165, 44.6 %) or
benecial withdrawal (n = 28, 7.6%). Hence, it can be
concluded that acne is more likely.
CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
The current system of collecting evidence on the effects
of nutrition on skin diseases could be improved. While
in modern drug testing many disruptive factors, such
as age, gender etc., are taken into account, confounders
caused by variation in the diets of study subjects are
usually not considered. However, in reviewing recent
scientic literature, there is evidence that foods can
inuence skin diseases in various ways. In summary,
in the example of acne, according to the literature, milk
and foods with a high glycaemic burden are the best
candidates for food-triggered inuence. However, it is
not currently possible to set out evidence-based nutritio-
nal recommendations in many cases (2). This database
linking various skin diseases with an alphabetical list of
foods may be help practitioners in making recommenda-
tions for dermatological patients concerning nutritional
guidance to support healing. Moreover, the results of
this collection may indicate suitable candidates for more
detailed testing, as long as the potential for benecial
inuence on the disease by the food is particularly high
or promising.
The authors declare no conict of interest.
REFERENCES
1. Burris J, Rietkerk W, Woolf K. Acne: the role of medical nutri-
tion therapy. J Acad Nutr Diet 2013; 113: 416–430.
2. Bronsnick T, Murzaku EC, Rao BK. Diet in dermatology: Part
I. Atopic dermatitis, acne, and nonmelanoma skin cancer. J
Am Acad Dermatol 2014; 71: 1039 e1–1039 e12.
3. Fulton JE, Jr, Plewig G, Kligman AM. Effect of chocolate on
acne vulgaris. JAMA 1969; 210: 2071–2074.
4. Atkins D, Best D, Briss PA, Eccles M, Falck-Ytter Y, Flottorp
S, et al. Grading quality of evidence and strength of recom-
mendations. BMJ 2004; 328: 1490.
5. Bigby M. Challenges to the hierarchy of evidence: does
the emperor have no clothes? Arch Dermatol 2001; 137:
345–346.
6. Spencer EH, Ferdowsian HR, Barnard ND. Diet and acne: a
review of the evidence. Int J Dermatol 2009; 48: 339–347.
7. Berra B, Rizzo AM. Glycemic index, glycemic load, wellness
and beauty: the state of the art. Clin Dermatol 2009; 27:
230–235.
8. Melnik BC. Western diet-induced imbalances of FoxO1 and
mTORC1 signalling promote the sebofollicular inammaso-
mopathy acne vulgaris. Exp Dermatol 2016; 25: 103–104.
9. Melnik BC. Milk – the promoter of chronic Western diseases.
Med Hypotheses 2009; 72: 631–639.
10. Logan AC. Dietary fat, ber, and acne vulgaris. J Am Acad
Dermatol 2007; 57: 1092–1093.
Fig. 1. Example: milk in acne. A total of 22 mentions include mostly
adverse effect (red/left horizontal arm), of these 2 at evidence Level C and
15 at Level D. Five articles reported no effect (Level D) (yellow/vertical
arm). No benecial inuence (green/right horizontal arm) of milk drinking
on acne was found.
ActaDV ActaDV
Advances in dermatology and venereology Acta Dermato-Venereologica
... Based on the evidence, AV is a common skin disease affecting approximately 9.4% of the world's population with the highest prevalence in adolescents. It affects over 90% of males and 80% of females in all ethnic groups (19)(20)(21) and has been the presenting complaint in 90% of people aged 13 to 25 in the Iraqi population. This study suggested that the mean age of AV incidence in males was 17 years. ...
... The number of adults with acne, including people over 25 years, is lower than those under 25 years and not included in this study. Previous studies investigating the potential link between lifestyle and AV have shown controversial results (19). Moreover, the literature review suggested that the prevalence of AV varies with several genetic and environmental factors. ...
... concentrations were significantly lower in the AVM group, compared to the control group. On the other hand, the Zn/Cu index was dramatically lower in the AVM group (1.05±0.19), compared tothe control group (1.78±0.08). ...
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It has been approved that the normal physiology of skin can be adversely affected by acne vulgaris (AV). This disorder leads to impairment of stratum corneum hydration and causes trans epidermal water loss. The normal physiology of the males’ skin is different from the normal physiology of females’ skin. Therefore, in case of any skin disorder, choosing the best strategy and treatment should be investigated seriously in each gender. Therefore the current study was designed to investigate the effect of two important trace elements (i.e., zinc [Zn] and copper [Cu]) on skin health and the correlation of Zn/Cu index with the physiological activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and glutaredoxins (Grx) in males with AV. In total, 100 samples were obtained from 60 males (in the age range of 17-20 years) with a definite diagnosis of AV (AVM group) and 40 males (in the age range of 18-20 years) with normal skin as the control group (CON group). The blood samples were obtained from each participant. The blood samples were centrifuged for the measurements of Zn, Cu, Zn/Cu index, SOD1, and GRx, and serum samples were preserved at -20°C until use. Moreover, Zn, Cu, and Zn/Cu index were determined using spectrophotometric kits. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, as the preferred method, was performed for SOD1 and GPx measurements. On the other hand, in this study, body mass index (BMI) and age were considered to have a possible association with the incidence of acne in males. The recorded data showed that there were no significant differences between the AVM group and controls in terms of BMI. The recorded data showed that Zn (AVM:151±10.7; CON:189±9.7) and Cu (AVM:55±5.2; CON: 77±4.8) concentration was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in the AVM group, compared to controls. On the other hand, the Zn/Cu index was significantly lower in the AVM group (1.05±0.19), compared to the control group (1.78±0.08). The results of the SOD1 and GRx assay showed that the AVM group suffered from a significant reduction in the SOD1 and GRx concentration, compared to the group of control. Overall, it can be concluded that the improvement of the antioxidant enzyme activity and supplementation of trace elements may significantly reduce the incidence of AV in males.
... Based on the evidence, AV is a common skin disease affecting approximately 9.4% of the world's population with the highest prevalence in adolescents. It affects over 90% of males and 80% of females in all ethnic groups (19)(20)(21) and has been the presenting complaint in 90% of people aged 13 to 25 in the Iraqi population. This study suggested that the mean age of AV incidence in males was 17 years. ...
... The number of adults with acne, including people over 25 years, is lower than those under 25 years and not included in this study. Previous studies investigating the potential link between lifestyle and AV have shown controversial results (19). Moreover, the literature review suggested that the prevalence of AV varies with several genetic and environmental factors. ...
... concentrations were significantly lower in the AVM group, compared to the control group. On the other hand, the Zn/Cu index was dramatically lower in the AVM group (1.05±0.19), compared tothe control group (1.78±0.08). ...
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... Hence, studies have suggested dermatologists to encourage patients with acne to avoid refined carbohydrates and shift to low glycemic index foods [8]. Recent change in lifestyle globally and its effect on diet has ultimately affected body mass index that is linked to increase the prevalence and severity of acne [10][11][12]. ...
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... The prevalence of acne is high during adolescence due to hormonal changes; however, it also appears in response to exogenous factors such as an unhealthy diet (51,52) and psychological background factors. Three major types of foods have been found to promote the appearance of acne lesions: hyperglycemic carbohydrates, dairy products, and saturated fats (53). ...
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... Beyond genetic factors, considered as the main cause in the development of acne, several evidence reported that commonly attribute the acne condition or its exacerbation also to hormonal influences and dietary factors [13,14]. Despite the scientific literature reporting contradictory result and conclusions on the role of diet in acne, due especially to the numerous limitations of study design, recently some well-designed, controlled, prospective studies have shown the relationship among specific nutrients and clinical severity of acne [13,[15][16][17]. Of interest, associations have been reported between cow's milk intake and consumption of high-glycaemic index foods with presence and longer acne duration [17]. ...
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Background: Acne is a chronic, inflammatory and debilitating skin disorder. Dietary factors and nutritional status are among the exacerbating factors of acne. Phase angle (PhA), a direct measure of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA), represents an indicator of the chronic inflammatory state. The Mediterranean diet (MD) is a healthy dietary pattern that can exert anti-inflammatory effects in several inflammatory diseases. We aimed to investigate the difference in PhA and adherence to the MD and their associations with the severity of acne in a sample of naïve treatment patients with acne compared to control group. Materials: In this cross-sectional, case-control, observational study, we enrolled 51 patients with acne and 51 control individuals. Body composition was evaluated by a BIA phase-sensitive system (50 kHz BIA 101 RJL, Akern Bioresearch, Florence, Italy, Akern). For adherence to the MD, we have used the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) questionnaire. The clinical severity of acne was assessed by using the global acne grading system (GAGS), a quantitative scoring system to assess acne severity. Results: Patients with acne had a worse body composition, in particular smaller PhA (p = 0.003), and a lower adherence to the MD (p < 0.001) than the control group, in spite of no differences in gender, age and BMI between the two groups. Stratifying patients with acne according to GAGS categories, both PhA (p = 0.006) and PREDIMED score (p = 0.007) decreased significantly in severe acne than mild/moderate acne. The GAGS score was negative correlations with PhA (r = - 0.478, p < 0.001) and PREDIMED score (r = - 0.504, p < 0.001). The results of the multivariate analysis showed PhA and PREDIMED score were the major determinants of GAGS score (p < 0.001). The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis reporting a value of PhA of ≤ 6.1° and a PREDIMED score of ≤ 9 identified patients with acne with the highest clinical severity of the disease. Conclusions: Novel correlations were reported between PhA and the degree of adherence to the MD with acne severity. Of interest, PhA and PREDIMED scores might represent possible markers of the severity of acne in a clinical setting. This study highlights how a cooperation between dermatologist and nutritionists might provide a combination key in the complex management of acne patients.
... Nos últimos anos, diversos estudos foram publicados e revisados, com a finalidade de avaliar a relação entre a acne e a dieta 9 . Dentro destes círculos de estudos, uma revisão feita por Fiedler et al. 17 mostrou que o leite e alimentos com alto índice glicêmico são os melhores candidatos à influência da acne desencadeada por alimentos. Em outro estudo, também foi possível demonstrar, que várias cepas de probióticos podem atuar como coadjuvante no tratamento da acne em pacientes de diferentes faixas etárias, sendo eficazes, seguros e bem tolerados 18 . ...
Article
Nos últimos anos, tem surgido uma nova consciência para melhorar a qualidade de vida e reduzir tanto os danos à saúde quanto os gastos com tratamentos. Isso tem contribuído para o desenvolvimento e aumento do uso dos alimentos funcionais, nutracêuticos e nutricosméticos. Devido a isso e ao aumento dos estudos e pesquisas na área, uma revisão mostra-se importante para consolidação dos argumentos baseados em evidências científicas. Tendo isto em vista, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a relação do consumo de nutricosméticos nas desordens estéticas selecionadas: acne e envelhecimento cutâneo. O presente estudo foi desenvolvido com base em análise documental, constituindo-se de uma revisão de literatura sobre o uso de nutricosméticos na prevenção e tratamento da acne e envelhecimento cutâneo. Os estudos analisados neste trabalho trouxeram o ômega 3 e os probióticos como principais nutricosméticos que atuam no tratamento da acne, melhorando os sinais de inflamação dessa desordem. Já para o envelhecimento cutâneo, os principais nutricosméticos evidenciados, foram aqueles à base de propriedades antioxidantes. Todos mostraram que os efeitos antioxidantes contribuem para atenuar os sinais de envelhecimento. Ao final desta revisão, reforçamos a ideia de que os nutricosméticos apresentados vem a contribuir com os tratamentos em nutrição estética.Descritores: Ciências da Nutrição; Estética; Fitoterapia; Envelhecimento.ReferênciasBorumand M, Sibila S. Daily consumption of the collagen supplement Pure Gold Collagen® reduces visible signs of aging. Clin Interv Aging. 2014;13(9):1747-58.Addor FAS. Abordagem nutricional do envelhecimento cutâneo: correlação entre efeitos em fibroblastos e resultados clínicos. Surg Cosmet Dermatol. 2011;3(1):12-16.Strutzel E, Cabello H, Queiroz L, Falcão MC. Análise dos Fatores de risco para o envelhecimento da pele: aspectos gerais e nutricionais. Rev Bras Nutr Clin. 2007;22(2):139-45Barros MD, Oliveira RPA. 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