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Abstract

The burden of malnutrition presents itself in multiple, complex, and connected ways. Malnutrition does not always imply hunger or famine and is manifest in many forms, ranging from hunger to obesity. Core factors leading to malnutrition include excessive intakes, insufficient food consumption, and inadequate utilization of nutrients provided by foods ingested. Undernutrition is a term that comprises stunting, underweight, wasting, and deficiency in essential vitamins and minerals (also called micronutrients). As such, it is the category of malnutrition that represents nutrient deficits. The other form of malnutrition is associated with excessive energy and nutrient intakes (which may also be accompanied by micronutrient deficiencies or suboptimal intakes), leading to obesity and other diet-related noncommunicable diseases. This article focuses on undernutrition and the challenges countries face in dealing with both undernutrition and overnutrition, in essence, the dilemma of overlapping and coexisting forms of malnutrition.

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... In addition to the nutritional status measures or indicators, the FAO uses WASH factors as proxies to assess the morbidity status or burden of enteric diseases and safety of domestic food preparation practices as domains of HFI. These are conceptualized to be relatable to the optimal utilization of food supplies accessed within households WHO, 2017, 2020; Malnutrition is defined as inadequate or excess intake (imbalanced intake) of protein, energy (calories), and micronutrients resulting in physiological dysfunctions or disorders in the body (Ngo, Ortiz-Andrellucchi, & Serra-Majem, 2016). There are two main sides to malnutrition, over-nutrition and undernutrition (Maleta, 2006). ...
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Article
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The Undernutrition Prevention Center (UPC) of the Corporation for Childhood Nutrition (CONIN) assists children from 0-3 years of age who present with primary or secondary undernutrition. The aim of the retrospective study reported here was to complete a nutritional, cognitive, and social evaluation of UPC children in Mendoza, Argentina, from 1996 to 2005. During the study period, a total of 478 schoolchildren aged 5-17 years (186 in the CONIN group and 292 in the non-CONIN group) were evaluated. Although no differences in weight and height were found between the groups, the percentage of children below the cutoff level for the maturity test was significantly lower in the CONIN group (10.8% versus 17.6%; P = 0.043). CONIN provides important social support to families through work qualification programs and health education.
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