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Effect of linseed oil on oxidative stress parameters and lipid profile in offspring of obese rats

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine linseed oil's effect on oxidative stress parameters and lipid profile in three generations of offspring of obese rats. The initial age of the female rats is two months and of a weight of 100 ± 10 g were fed for two months with a control diet or a cafeteria diet, fortified or not with linseed oil (5%). At the end of this period the female rats are coupled by male rats. After parturition, one third of newborns in each group were scarified. During lactation the mothers continued to follow the same diet as pregnancy. After weaning, the offspring continue to follow the same diet as the mothers. In 30 days after birth the second third in each group of offspring were scarified and the last third in each group were scarified in 90 days after birth. The blood was drawn for determine biochemical parameters (glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides) and oxidative stress markers (carbonyl proteins, malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, superoxide anion, catalase, superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione and vitamin C). The offspring of the group which was fed a cafeteria diet showed hyperlipidemia, an imbalance of blood glucose and a high oxidative stress. The addition of linseed oil to cafeteria diet has corrected these complications. In conclusion, Linseed oil in rats during pregnancy has shown beneficial effects in the prevention of obesity and these metabolic disorders and has struggled against oxidative stress in the offspring.

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Protective effect of linseed oil on hyperlipidemia in experimental animals
  • Ge Rasmy
Rasmy GE (2007). Protective effect of linseed oil on hyperlipidemia in experimental animals. JGEB., 5: 9-17.