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A conceptual model of new hypothesis on the evolution of biodiversity

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The mechanisms that allow species to evolve, coexist, compete, cooperate or become extinct are becoming always more understood. At the same time, the factors that allow species to coexist in a given time within the same environment are still debated. Many theories and hypotheses suggest that competition tends to differentiate the ecological requirements after repeated interactions and to allow the presence of many different species in the same area (i.e. biodiversity). After all, a thorough understanding of the evolutionary dynamics of biodiversity, which could somehow explain the current distribution patterns and mechanisms of coexistence, must consider the biogeographic and phylogenetic approaches. Here I propose a new graphic model that reviews the past and present, and sometimes debated, trends in biodiversity and evolutionary science, pointing out the importance of the avoidance of competition, the biological history, the
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... This process could explain the missing evidence of the presence of DNA in flagella and peroxisomes whose ancestor endosymbionts, during the long endogenosymbiotic evolution, could have transferred their whole genome to the host cell that subsequently integrated it in its own genome, directly controlling its expression. Furthermore, the endogenosymbiosis hypothesis could be the explanation of the transition between an RNA to a DNA world and of some cases of true sympatric evolution of species, apparently inexplicable by the canonical speciation processes (Enard et al. 2007;Berlanga et al. 2007;Cazzolla Gatti 2016). ...
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