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Sagrinae species occurring in Laos are reviewed. For each species, a faunistic overview, new records and additional taxonomic remarks are given where necessary. Sagra fulgida Weber, 1801 is recorded for the first time from Laos. Sagra carbunculus Hope, 1842 is excluded from the Laotian fauna as a doubtful record. In total five of nine Oriental species of Sagra are presently recorded from Laos. A key to all species of Sagra occurring in the Oriental Region is given.
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Sagrinae of Laos (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)
by Lukáš Sekerka & Michael Geiser
Abstract. Sagrinae species occurring in Laos are reviewed. For each species, a faunistic overview, new records
and additional taxonomic remarks are given where necessary. Sagra fulgida Weber, 1801 is recorded for the
first time from Laos. Sagra carbunculus Hope, 1842 is excluded from the Laotian fauna as a doubtful record.
In total five of nine Oriental species of Sagra are presently recorded from Laos. A key to all species of Sagra
occurring in the Oriental Region is given.
Key words. Entomology – taxonomy – identification key – Sagrinae – Chrysomelidae – Oriental Region –
Indochina.
Introduction
Sagrinae, also known as kangaroo or frog-beetles, are a small subfamily of leaf
beetles (Chrysomelidae) with 67 species, mainly distributed in the Old World tropics
(MONRÓS 1958, KONSTANTINOV & SEKERKA 2010, SEKERKA & VOISIN 2014). The
subfamily is most diverse in Australia, where 11 genera and 33 species occur, most of
them endemic, except for the widespread S. femorata (Drury, 1773). The only genus
represented in the Oriental Region is Sagra Fabricius, 1792. Its species display great
intraspecific variability in colour and morphological characters, and as a result many
individual or geographic forms were described under different names (e.g. S. femorata
has about 40 synonyms). Over time, these taxa have been reduced to subspecies,
varieties or aberrations and as a result only nine species are currently recognised as valid
in the Oriental region (CHEN & PU1962, KONSTANTINOV & SEKERKA 2010, SEKERKA &
VOISIN 2014).
Although Asiatic Sagrinae were reviewed and keyed out several times (e.g. JACOBY
1908, KUNTZEN 1914, CHEN 1942, CROWSON 1946, GRESSITT & KIMOTO 1961, CHEN &
PU1962, KIMOTO & GRESSITT 1979), their distribution and biology remains rather poorly
known. MAULIK (1941) published an overview on their biology with description of
immature stages of S. femorata. Larvae are stem borers in various shrubs and woody
lianas, mainly of the plant family Fabaceae (MAULIK 1941, CHEN & PU1962). However,
Sagra are known to be associated also with several other plant families, such as
Convolvulaceae, Dioscoreaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Meliaceae, Rubiaceae, Rutaceae, and
Verbenaceae (MAULIK 1941). Unfortunately, Maulik did not usually specify whether a
host plant record applied to adults or larvae. Records of adults may just be incidental.
The first records of Sagrinae from Laos were published as late as the 1940s (CHEN
1942, CHEN & PU1962), and lacked precise locality data. The first precise data were
published by KIMOTO & GRESSITT (1979). This contribution is the first comprehensive
overview of the Laotian fauna, presently including five of the nine Asiatic Sagrinae
species, while the occurrence of two further species is possible. Also, we provide a key
to all species occurring in the Oriental Region. The species placed in square brackets
have not yet been recorded for Laos, but may possibly occur there.
Entomologica Basiliensia et Collectionis Frey 35 443–453 2016 ISSN 1661–8041
L. SEKERKA & M. GEISER
Brief history of Laotian material
Land-locked Laos was for a long time one of the most inaccessible countries in
Asia, and only a few insect specimens were captured there before the 1920s. Early
specimens, labelled only “Laos”, were collected by Mouhot and purchased at Stevens’
Auctions in London by J. S. Baly. The largest collection until recent times was made by
René Vitalis de Salvaza, a French naturalist, who collected extensively in French
Indochina between 1913–1922. In his time travelling in Laos was difficult, and most
easily achieved by boat along the major rivers. Despite this fact, Vitalis also travelled
overland in northern Laos and was able to reach some remote inland localities,
particularly in today’s Louangnamtha province. His material was partly sold by Eugene
Le Moult and is spread among several collections. The bulk of his chrysomelids are now
preserved in the museums in Paris (mainly via Maurice Pic and René Oberthür
collections), London (individually purchased), Prague (via Julien Achard collection),
and Genoa (purchased by Gestro). Probably, many other museums and institutions also
hold some of Vitalis’ material, due to exchanges among museums and private collectors.
Much of his material in Paris and Prague is quite poorly labelled, even though Vitalis
seemed to have been rather precise in noting localities for his material, including dates
of collection. Unfortunately, some of his contemporaries did not value his locality data,
and many duplicate specimens were labelled rather poorly in their collections. This is
particularly true for Prague material which was mounted but has no precise locality data.
There must have been several boxes of Vitalis’ material when Achard’s collection
entered the museum in 1926. Part of the material was provided with the typical Le Moult
and Achard small labels with locality data but without date (material collected in 1918
and perhaps before). However, most specimens in Achard’s material came from the
expeditions after 1920 and when they were mounted, only the first specimen in the series
was provided with a locality label and the others ones only eventually with dates of
collection, if different from the first specimen. These labels were handwritten by Achard.
Unfortunately, nearly all specimens were later provided only with a general handwritten
label “Haut-Laos Vitalis” by Jan Bechynì and incorporated into the general collection,
thus the precise locality data were lost. Luckily in some specimens, Achard’s original
labels with collecting dates were preserved, so there is some possibility of tracing
localities based on these dates.
Perhaps also some specimens labelled “Tonkin” or “Indochina” may have
originated from present-day Laos, which used to be part of colonial French Indochina,
and some of its border areas may have been formerly assigned to Tonkin.
Later on, during the 1960s, J. A. Rondon collected extensively in Laos, partly with
the help of local collectors. His material was worked on by KIMOTO & GRESSITT (1979)
and is deposited in the Bernice P. Bishop Museum in Hawaii.
Until fairly recently, the fauna of Laos remained one of the most poorly known in
SE Asia. The country became more accessible to foreign visitors about 20 years ago,
which led to an increase in the number of entomological expeditions. Particularly
extensive material was assembled during the “Beetles of Laos” survey project organised
by the Basel Natural History Museum.
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Entomologica Basiliensia et Collectionis Frey 35, 2016 445
Abbreviations for studied collections
BMNH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Natural History Museum, London, UK (Max Barclay)
JBC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . collection of Jan Bezdìk (Brno, Czech Republic)
LSC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . collection of Lukáš Sekerka (Prague, Czech Republic)
IRSN . . . . . . . Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles, Bruxelles, Belgium (Pol Limbourg)
NHMB . . . . . Naturhistorisches Museum Basel, Switzerland (the late Michael Brancucci)
NMPC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . National Museum, Prague, Czech Republic (Jiøí Hájek)
Key to species of Sagra of the Oriental Region
1 Pronotum coarsely punctate; punctures easily visible with a hand-lens
(10×). ............................................................................................... 2
Pronotum at most with a few fine punctures, appearing impunctate and
matt at low magnifications. …......................................................... 8
2 Apex of mesosternum round, convex and small. ............................... 4
Apex of mesosternum enlarged and horseshoe-shaped. ...................... 3
3 Hind femora with three preapical teeth, in female usually only the first
is distinct, in males the middle tooth is grouped with the third thus first
looks separated. Inner lower surface of male femora densely
pubescent. Cambodia, China (Guagdong, Yunnan), Indonesia (Java,
Sumatra), Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam.
Fig. 8. ......................................................... S. odontopus Gistel, 1831
Hind femora with three preapical teeth in both, male and female; they
are equidistant to each other or with the first two teeth more closely
placed. Inner lower surface of male femora sparsely pubescent and
appears almost bare. China (Yunnan). ...................................................
............................................................. S. moghanii Chen et Pu, 1962
4 Elytra 1.3–1.5 times longer than wide, body outline stout and oval. .....
............................................................................................................ 5
Elytra at least twice as long as wide, body outline elongate and
parallel-sided. China (Yunnan), India, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and
Vietnam. Fig. 6. ................................................. S. jansoni Baly, 1860
5 Dorsum bright metallic. ...................................................................... 6
Dorsum black, only humeri with metallic purple spots. China
(Guizhou, Yunnan and Zhejiang). Fig. 5. ... S. humeralis Jacoby, 1904
6 Pronotum shiny, its punctation sparse to moderate but punctures never
touching each other. Elytra uniformly coloured. …............................ 7
Pronotum dull, coarsely and densely punctate. Elytra purplish-green,
usually with elongate deep blue spot along suture. Male tibia without
preapical tooth. Cambodia, China (Yunnan), Myanmar, Laos,
Thailand, and Vietnam. Fig. 7. …..................... S. mouhoti Baly, 1861
7 Males with preapical tooth on hind tibia and inner part of hind femora
densely pubescent. Southern China, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, and
Vietnam. Figs 3–4. …..................................... S. fulgida Weber, 1801
L. SEKERKA & M. GEISER
Males without preapical tooth on hind tibia and hind femora glabrous.
With certainty found in Bhutan, NE India and Nepal, records from SE
Asia needs verification. Fig. 1. …............ S. carbunculus Hope, 1842
8 Elytra with several coarse punctures. Dorsal colouration very variable
but never with wedge-shaped patch along suture. Whole tropical Asia
from India to Australia. Fig. 2. .................. S. femorata (Drury, 1773)
Elytra entirely impunctate. Elytra dark green with multicolorous
wedge-shaped patch along suture. Indonesia, Malaysia and
Philippines. ….............................................. S. buquetii Lesson, 1831
Sagrinae species recorded from Laos
[Sagra carbunculus Hope, 1842]
Published faunistic data. “Laos” (CHEN 1942).
Notes. CHEN (1942) published records from Laos and Cambodia of this species, among
others, without exact locality, which constitute the first records of S. carbunculus from
these countries. This was the only existing record for Laos and was repeated by CHEN &
PU(1962) and KIMOTO & GRESSITT (1979). Unfortunately, we had no opportunity to
verify Chen’s material and see whether he had mislabelled or misidentified specimens.
The latter could have easily been the case, since females of S. carbunculus are nearly
inseparable from those of S. fulgida. So far we have not seen any specimen of S.
carbunculus from former French Indochina and the species seems to be restricted to
mountain regions of NE India, Nepal, China and possibly also Myanmar. Its occurrence
in Laos requires confirmation based on recent specimens. Hence, the species is treated
here as only possibly occurring in Laos.
Sagra carbunculus is closest to S. fulgida and, like S. mouhoti, differs in male hind
femora lacking a preapical tooth. The latter differs from S. carbunculus in very coarsely
and densely punctate pronotum, appearing nearly dull and punctures touching each other
at least in apical third while S. carbunculus and S. fulgida have shiny and coarsely but
sparsely punctate pronotum. Females are quite difficult to distinguish, however, typical
populations of S. fulgida differ in much sparser and finer punctation of elytra while the
southern populations have a coarser elytral surface with impressed wrinkles. Also we
have not seen specimens of S. carbunculus that are completely metallic blue, which is a
very common coloration in S. fulgida.
Sagra femorata (Drury, 1773)
Published faunistic data. “Laos” (CHEN 1942); BORIKHAMXAY: Pakkading, CHAMPASACK: Pakse,
Paksong, Houei Kong, KHAMMUANE: Phon Tiou, VIENTIANE: Ban Thonpheng, Ban Van Heua, Vientiane,
XAYABURY: Paklay, Sayaboury (KIMOTO & GRESSITT 1979).
New faunistic data. ATTAPEU: Thong Kai Ohk, Ban Kachung (Mai) env., 15°01–02N, 107°26–27E,
1200–1450 m, 10.–24.vi.2011, 1 spec., M. Brancucci, M. Geiser, D. Hauck, Z. Kraus, A. Phanthala & E.
Vongphachan lgt. (NHMB). BOKEO: Ban Toup, Bokeo Nature Reserve, 20°27–28N, 100°45E, 500–700 m,
446
Entomologica Basiliensia et Collectionis Frey 35, 2016 447
4.–18.v.2011, 3 spec., M. Brancucci, M. Geiser, D. Hauck, Z. Kraus, A. Phanthala & E. Vongphachan lgt.
(NHMB). BORIKHAMXAY: 8 km NE of Ban Nape, 18°21N, 105°08E, ca. 600 m, 7 spec., P. Pacholátko
lgt. (NHMB); Nam Kading NPA, Tad Paloy campsite, 18°21–23N, 104°09E, 250–400 m, 24.–28.v.2011, 1
spec., M. Geiser, D. Hauck, A. Phantala & E. Vongphachan lgt. (NHMB). HOUAPHANH: Ban Saluei to Phou
Pane Mt., 20°12.0–13.5N, 103°59.5–104°01.0E, 1340–1870 m, 15.iv.–15.v.2008, 10 spec., Lao collector lgt.
(NMPC), 10.v.–16.vi.2009, 100 spec., M. Brancucci & local coll. lgt. (NHMB), 20°11–13N,
103°59–104°01E, 1300–1900 m, 9.–17.vi.2009, 7 spec., M. Geiser lgt. (NHMB); Phou Pane Mt., 20°12N,
104°01E, 1500–1900 m, v.2007, 16 spec., Lao collector lgt. (NMPC), 17.v.–3.vi.2007, 9 spec., M. Brancucci
lgt. (NHMB), 20°13N, 104°00E, 1350–1500 m, 1.–16.vi.2009, 44 spec., M. Brancucci lgt. (NHMB),
20°1309–19N, 103°5954–104°0003E, 1480–1550 m, 9.–16.vi.2009, 1 spec., D. Hauck lgt. (NHMB); Phu
Loei, Ban Sakok N.P., 20°10N 103°12E, 23.–26.v.2001, 3 spec., J. Bezdìk lgt. (JBC). KHAMMUANE:
Nakai-Nam Theun NPA, Ban Navang env., 17°57–59N, 105°13–16E, 600–750 m, 18.–21.v.2012, 1 spec., M.
Brancucci & M. Geiser lgt. (NHMB); Takek [= Thakhek], 4 spec. (IRSN). LOUANGNAMTHA: Luang
Namtha, 800–1200 m, 5.–31.v.1997, 7 spec. (JBC); Namtha to Muang Sing, 21°09N, 101°19E, 900–1200 m,
5.–31.v.1997, 15 spec., V. Kubáò lgt. (NHMB); Nam Mat (Haut-Mékong), 15.iv.1918, 5 spec., 24.iv.1918, 1
spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC). LUANGPRABANG: 5 km W of Ban Song Cha, 20°33–34N,
102°14E, ca. 1200 m, 24.–30.iv.1999, 1 spec., 24.iv.–16.v.1999, 18 spec., 1.–9.v.1999, 1 spec., 10.–16.v.1999,
2 spec., V. Kubáò lgt. (NHMB); Louang Prabang, ix.1917, 9 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (BMNH), 600 m,
20.vii.2003, 1 spec., 22.vii.2003, 1 spec., 6.viii.2003, 1 spec., 20.vi.2004, 1 spec., Šlachta lgt. (LSC); Louang
Prabang-A Theng, 1888, 1 spec., A. Pavie lgt. (IRSN); Ban Hou, 2 spec., x.1918, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza
lgt. (NMPC); Muang Ngoy Neua env., Ban Kioukhan, 20°45N, 102°42E, ca. 800 m, secondary forest, on low
vegetation, 7.viii. 2004, 1 spec., M. Geiser lgt. (BMNH); Pak Lung, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC);
Pak Neun, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC); Thong Khang, 19°35N, 101°58E, 11.–21.v.2002, ca.
750 m, 5 spec., V. Kubáò lgt. (NHMB), 19°33–34N, 101°57E, 670–1160 m, 30.vi.–1.vii.2010, 1 spec., M.
Brancucci & M. Geiser lgt. (NHMB). OUDOMXAY: 17 km NEE of Oudom Xai, 20°45N, 102°09E, ca. 1100
m, 1.–9.v.2002, 1 spec., V. Kubáò lgt. (NHMB). PHONGSALY: Ban Sano Mai, 21°21N , 102°03E,
19–26.v.2004, ca. 1150 m, 10 spec., P. Pacholátko lgt. (NHMB), 5 spec. M. Brancucci lgt. (NHMB); Boun
Neua, 21°38N, 101°57E, ca. 1100 m, 26.v.2004, 1 spec. M. Brancucci lgt. (NHMB); Phongsaly env.,
21°41–42N, 102°06–08E, ca. 1500 m, 18.v.–20.vi.2003, 3 spec., V. Kubáò lgt. (NHMB), 6.–17.v.2004, 1
spec., P. Pacholátko lgt. (NHMB). SARAVANE: Xe Xap NPA, ca. 15 km NE of Ta-oy, Ban Doub env.,
400–1000 m, 16°08N, 106°40–43E, 25.–31.v. 2012, 1 spec., M. Brancucci, M. Geiser, K. Phanthavong & S.
Xayalath lgt. (NHMB). SAVANNAKHET: Tché–Poné [= Xépôn], 1914, 3 spec., L. Dussault lgt. (NHMB).
VIENTIANE: Vang Vieng env., ca. 2 km SW of the village, forest edge, on shrubs, 16.viii.2004, 1 spec., M.
Geiser lgt. (BMNH); Vientiane, 60 spec., 1918, 13 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC, 6 LSC), 25.v.1915,
1 spec., 29.v.1915, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (BMNH), 6.–17.vii.1989, 1 spec. T. Scholz lgt. (LSC);
Vientiane-Sikhay, 6.viii.1989, 1 spec. T. Scholz lgt. (LSC); Vientiane-Thangone, 11.vi.1989, 1 spec. T. Scholz
lgt. (LSC); “Vientian”, 1 spec. (BMNH). XAYABURY: Hongsa env., 19°40–44N, 101°20E, 550–750 m,
2.–3.vii.2010, 1 spec., D. Hauck lgt. (NHMB); Paklay, 3 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC, 1 LSC),
viii.1917, 18 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (BMNH, 2 LSC); Xayaboury env., 19°13N, 101°42E, ca. 300
m, 27.–30.vi.2010, 1 spec., D. Hauck lgt. (NHMB). XIENGKHUANG: Ban Tha Chôk to Ban Na Sala,
19°32–33N, 103°25–27E, 23.–26.v.2010, 1 spec., 930–1175 m, M. Geiser & D. Hauck lgt. (NHMB); “Xieng
Khouang”, 3 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC), 13.v.1919, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (BMNH).
UNKNOWN LOCALITIES: “Laos”, 1 spec. (NHMB), 1 spec. (IRSN); “Haut–Laos”, 11 spec., 21.iii.1920,
5 spec., 23.iii.1920, 1 spec., 26.iii.1920, 9 spec., 31.iii.1920, 3 spec., 13.v. 1920, 3 spec., 10.vii.1920, 1 spec.,
R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC, 2 LSC); Ban Quang, 24.iv.1918, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC);
Hat Lon Li, 2 spec. (NMPC, LSC); Triton (Haut-Laos), 31.iii.1922, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC).
Notes. A widespread and very polymorphic species in SE Asia. Individual forms and
populations were described as distinct nominal taxa. However, all were shown to be
products of intraspecific variability, connected by intermediate forms and often two or
more former “species” occur together on one plant and emerge from one gall. Sagra
femorata can be easily separated from other species by its finely punctate pronotum,
which appears impunctate at low magnifications.
L. SEKERKA & M. GEISER
Sagra fulgida Weber, 1801
Published faunistic data. New species to Laos.
New faunistic data. HOUAPHANH: Ban Saluei, 900–1400 m, 10.–25.vi.2010, 2 spec., S. Jakl lgt. (LSC);
Ban Saluei to Phou Pane Mt., 20°12–13.5N, 103°59.5–104°01E, 1340–1870 m, 10.v.–16.vi.2009, 8 spec., M.
Brancucci & local coll. lgt. (NHMB, 3 LSC); Phou Pane Mt., 20°15N, 104°02E, 1500–2000 m,
26.iv.–11.v.2001, 1 spec., J. Bezdìk lgt. (JBC), 20°12N, 104°01E, 1500–1900 m, v.2007, 2 spec., Lao
collector lgt. (NMPC), 17.v.–3.vi.2007, 3 spec., M. Brancucci lgt. (NHMB), 20°13N, 104°00E, 1350–1500
m, 1.–16.vi.2009, 6 spec., M. Brancucci lgt. (NHMB, 2 LSC). LUANGPRABANG: 5 km W of Ban Song
Cha, 20°33–34N, 102°14E, ca. 1200 m, 1.–16.v.1999, 1 spec., V. Kubáò lgt. (NHMB). OUDOMXAY: 17 km
NEE of Oudom Xai, 20°45N, 102°09E, ca. 1100 m, 1.–9.v.2002, 4 spec., V. Kubáò lgt. (NHMB).
PHONGSALY: Ban Sano Mai, 21°21N , 102°03E, 19–26.v.2004, ca. 1150 m, 6 spec., P. Pacholátko lgt.
(NHMB); Phongsaly env., 21°41–42N, 102°06–08E, ca. 1500 m, 28.v.–20.vi.2003, 8 spec., P. Pacholátko lgt.
(NHMB, 1 LSC), 28.v.–20.vi.2003, 1 spec., M. Brancucci lgt. (NHMB), 6.–17.v.2004, 9 spec., P. Pacholátko
lgt. (NHMB, 1 LSC). XIENGKHUANG: 30 km NE of Phonsavan, 19°37–8N, 103°20E, 1400–1500 m,
10.–30.v.2009, 1 spec., Z. Kraus lgt. (NHMB).
Notes. Sagra fulgida is a widespread species in SE Asia and quite polymorphic.
Individual forms were described under several names, however, these were recently
synonymised with the nominal species (SEKERKA 2010, SEKERKA & VOISIN 2014).
Typical specimens (also described as S. leechi Jacoby, 1888; Fig. 4) have very smooth
and polished elytra with very fine and sparse punctation, and green or golden green
elytra. The form with blue elytra was described as subspecies janthina Chen, 1942,
however, except for colour there are no morphological differences from the
nominotypical taxon. The typical form and its colour aberrations occur in SE China. The
form distributed in Yunnan and former Indochina was described under the name minuta
Pic, 1930 (= insuturalis Pic, 1953, subalutacea Pic, 1953; see SEKERKA & VOISIN (2014)
for details; Fig. 3) and differs from the typical form in the irregular surface of the elytra
with impressed wrinkles and coarse punctation. It was treated as subspecies by CHEN &
PU(1962). However, the elytral structure of S. fulgida becomes gradually coarser from
E China (Fujian, Jiangxi, Zhejiang) to SE China (Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hubei,
Sichuan) and, the populations from Yunnan southwards (= S. minuta) are the most
coarsely punctate.
Laotian populations of Sagra fulgida can easily be separated from the other small-
sized Sagra species by the irregular and quite coarse surface sculpture of the elytra, with
small but distinct impressed wrinkles and punctures. Other species have elytra finely to
moderately punctate, but never with impressed wrinkles. The species is often
misidentified as S. odontopus, but the latter has an enlarged and horse-shoe shaped
mesosternal apex (small and round in S. fulgida) and metallic blue colour (all specimens
of S. fulgida we have seen from Laos had purple elytra). Specimens of S. mouhoti with
reduced sutural stripe have similar colour, but differ in having pronotum densely
punctate and dull while that of S. fulgida is shiny and sparsely punctate.
[Sagra humeralis Jacoby, 1904]
Notes. The species is known from China: Guizhou, Yunnan and Zhejiang (JACOBY 1904,
CHEN 1935). CHEN (1935) also added “Tonkin” (probably according to ACHARD 1913)
and this record was repeated by subsequent authors who interpreted the locality as
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Entomologica Basiliensia et Collectionis Frey 35, 2016 449
northern Vietnam (CHEN & PU1962, KIMOTO & GRESSITT 1979). However, ACHARD
(1913) published a redescription of S. humeralis and noted it was described from “Mouy
Tsé (Tonkin)”. This locality is now situated in southern Yunnan, at that time part of the
French protectorate of Tonkin. Therefore Vietnam should be deleted from the species’
known range, as no known specimen originates from present-day Vietnam. On the other
hand it is quite likely that the species could be found in the mountains of Laos or
Vietnam, adjacent to the Chinese border, thus is included here as a possible candidate for
the Laotian fauna.
Sagra humeralis can be easily separated from others by its dull black body with
metallic purple spot on humeri. So far this species is only known from a few specimens.
Sagra jansoni Baly, 1860
Published faunistic data. BORIKHAMXAY: Pakkading, CHAMPASACK: Khong Island, Pakse,
KHAMMUANE: Phon Tiou, VIENTIANE: Ban Van Heua, Phou Khau Khouei, XAYABURY: Sayaboury
(KIMOTO & GRESSITT 1979).
New faunistic data. HOUAPHANH: Phou Pane Mt., 20°12N, 104°01E, 1500–1900 m, v.2007, 1 spec., Lao
collector lgt. (NMPC). KHAMMOUANE: Takek [= Thakhek], 2 spec. (IRSN, 1 LSC). LUANGPRABANG:
Pak Neun, ix.1918, 2 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC). XAYABURY: Paklay, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de
Salvaza lgt. (NMPC), viii.1917, 8 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (BMNH, 1 LSC). UNKNOWN
LOCALITIES: “Haut-Laos”, 4 spec., 31.iii.1920, 11 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC, 4 LSC); Hat
Lon Li (Haut-Laos), ix.1918, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC).
Note. Sagra jansoni can be readily separated from other species with a coarsely punctate
pronotum by its elongate body, that is more than twice as long as wide.
Sagra mouhoti Baly, 1861
Published faunistic data. “Laos” (CHEN & PU1962); CHAMPASACK: Pakse, LOUANGNAMTHA: Muong
Sing (KIMOTO & GRESSITT 1979).
New faunistic data. XIENGKHUANG: “Xieng Khouang”, 13.v.1919, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt.
(BMNH); Ban Tha Chôk to Ban Na Sala, 19°32–35N, 103°25–27E, 930-1175 m, 2 spec., M. Geiser & D.
Hauck lgt. (NHMB, LSC).
Notes. KIMOTO & GRESSITT (1979) incorrectly listed the locality Muang Sing as being in
the Luangprabang province. It is situated in the Louangnamtha province.
This species has the most coarsely and densely punctate pronotum of all small
Asiatic Sagra species. The pronotum also appears dull, while in other species it is shiny
and sparsely punctate. Typical specimens of S. mouhoti have purple elytra with a broad,
blue sutural stripe, however, the stripe is sometimes reduced and such specimens are
often misidentified as southern populations of S. fulgida (= S. minuta). But the latter has
much sparser and finer punctation of the pronotum and hind tibia in males with a
preapical tooth that is absent in S. mouhoti.
[Sagra moghanii Chen et Pu, 1962]
Note. This species may be recorded from Laos in future, as it was described from
southern Yunnan (CHEN & PU1962). It is closest to S. odontopus, as both share enlarged
L. SEKERKA & M. GEISER
and horse-shoe shaped mesosternal apex. We have not seen any specimen of S. mohganii
but, according to the description, it differs in the structure of hind legs, as given in the
key.
Sagra odontopus Gistel, 1831
Published faunistic data. BORIKHAMXAY: Pakkading, CHAMPASACK: Houei Kong, Khong Sedone,
Pakse, KHAMMUANE: Phon Tiou, VIENTIANE: Ban Tonpheng, Ban Van Heua, Phou Khau Khouei,
Vientiane, XAYABURY: Paklay (KIMOTO & GRESSITT 1979).
New faunistic data. HOUAPHANH: Ban Saluei to Phou Pane Mt., 20°12.0–13.5N, 103°59.5–104°01E,
1340–1870 m, 10.v.–16.vi.2009, 1 spec., M. Brancucci & local coll. lgt. (NHMB); Ban Kangpabong env., 25
km SE Vieng Xai, 20°19N, 104°25E, 14.–18.v.2001, 3 spec., J. Bezdìk lgt. (JBC, LSC).
LUANGPRABANG: Luang Prabang, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (LSC); SARAVANE: Xe Xap NPA,
ca. 15 km NE of Ta-oy, Ban Doub env., 400–1000 m, 16°08N, 106°40–43E, 25.–31.v. 2012, 2 spec., M.
Brancucci, M. Geiser, K. Phanthavong & S. Xayalath lgt. (NHMB, LSC); VIENTIANE: Ban Vangheua, Phou
Khao Khouay N.P., 55 km N of Vientiane, 18°27N, 102°49E, 1000 m, 4.–18.v.2005, 1 spec., P. Kresl lgt.
(JBC); Vientiane, 6 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC, 1 LSC); XIENGKHUANG: Ban Tha Chôk to
Ban Na Sala, 19°32–35N, 103°25–27E, 930-1175 m, 23.–26.v.2010, 1 spec., M. Geiser & D. Hauck lgt.
(NHMB). UNKNOWN LOCALITIES: “Laos”, 1 spec., Mouhot lgt. (NHMB); “Haut-Laos”, 13.v.1920, 1
spec., 21.v.1920, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (LSC); Hat Lon Li, ix.1918, 2 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza
lgt. (NMPC).
Notes. Sagra odontopus can be easily recognised by the enlarged and horse-shoe shaped
apex of the mesosternum as other similar Laotian species have the apex small, round and
normally convex. It has also uniformly metallic blue dorsum while Laotian populations
of S. fulgida have purple elytra.
KIMOTO & GRESSITT (1979) published numerous specimens of S. odontopus from
various localities across Laos. On the other hand they listed no records of S. fulgida,
what is curious since that species appears to be the more common of the two in Laos. It
would be desirable to re-examine the material they studied, to determine whether all
records truly refer to S. odontopus, which has often been confused with S. fulgida.
Acknowledgements
We would like thank Max Barclay (BMNH), the late Michel Brancucci (NHMB),
Jiøí Hájek (NMPC) and Pol Limbourg (IRSN) for the loan of material used in this study,
as well as Keita Matsumoto (BMNH) for taking habitus pictures of S. humeralis and the
type of S. leechi Also, we would like to thank Isabelle Zürcher and Matthias Borer for
providing access to recently arrived material at NHMB. Furthermore, we thank our
colleagues Max Barclay (BMNH) and Jan Bezdìk (Mendel University, Brno) for their
review and helpful suggestions. Study of type specimens and other additional material
housed in BMNH and Musée National d’Histoire Naturelle, Paris was supported by the
Synthesys grants nos. GB-TAF-3616 and FR-TAF-4937 of the European Union to L.
Sekerka. The work was partly financially supported by Ministry of Culture of the Czech
Republic (DKRVO 2015/14, National Museum, 00023272).
450
Entomologica Basiliensia et Collectionis Frey 35, 2016 451
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(eds): Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera, Volume 6. Apollo Books, Stenstrup, 924 pp.
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Pars 51, Fasc. 1. W. Junk, ‘s-Gravenhage, 19 pp.
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SEKERKA L. & VOISIN J.-F. (2014): Types of Sagrinae in the collection of the Muséum national d’Histoire
naturelle, Paris (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae). Annales de la Société Entomologique de France (N. S.)
49(4): 413–429.
Author’s addresses:
Lukáš Sekerka
Department of Entomology
National Museum
Cirkusová 1740
CZ-19300, Prague
CZECH REPUBLIC
E-mail: sagrinae@gmail.com
Michael Geiser
University of Basel
Department of Environmental Sciences
Biogeography Research Group
St. Johanns-Vorstadt 10
CH-4056 Basel
SWITZERLAND
&
Department of Life Sciences
Natural History Museum
Cromwell Road
London SW7 5BD
UNITED KINGDOM
E-mail: m.geiser@nhm.ac.uk
Figs 1–4. 1 – Sagra carbunculus Hope, 1842 (India: Kurseong; female, LSC); 2 – S. femorata (Drury, 1773)
(Laos: Luang Prabang; female, LSC); 3 – S. fulgida Weber, 1801 (= S. minuta Pic, 1930) (Laos: Phongsaly
env.; male, LSC); 4 – S. fulgida Weber, 1801 (syntype of S. leechi Jacoby, 1888; female, BMNH).
L. SEKERKA & M. GEISER
452
Figs 5–8. 5 – Sagra humeralis Jacoby, 1904 (China: Yunnan, Wei-Xi; male, BMNH); 6 – S. jansoni Baly, 1860
(Thailand: Soppong; female, LSC); 7 – S. mouhoti Baly, 1861 (Thailand: Nam Nao; male, LSC); 8 – S.
odontopus Gistel, 1831 (Thailand: Chiang Mai; male, LSC).
Entomologica Basiliensia et Collectionis Frey 35, 2016 453
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
The type specimens of Sagrinae housed in the collections of the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle (Paris) are cataloged. All specimens present in the collection are listed with verbatim label data and discussed. The collection consists of 27 holotypes, one allotype, one paratype and 32 syntypes of 49 species. Results are summarized as follows. (1) Holotypes: Prionesthis funerarius Lacordaire 1845, Rhagiosoma obscurithorax Pic 1914, Sagra angolensis Pic 1939, S. bontempsii Fairmaire 1897, S. brevior Pic 1953, S. cribrosa Pic 1938, S. descarpentriesi David 1953, S. favareli Pic 1938, S. favareli var. crampeli Pic 1938, S. impressipennis Pic 1953, S. jansoni var. favrei Pic 1953, S. longefemoralis Pic 1938, S. luctuosa Fairmaire 1887, S. minor Pic 1939, S. minuta Pic 1930, S. minuta var. insuturalis Pic 1953, S. pici David 1953, S. habasi David 1953, S. jeanneli David 1953 (also with allotype and one paratype), S. longeciliata Pic 1938, S. longithorax Pic 1938, S. murrayi var. benitensis Pic 1938, S. nitidissima Pic 1953, S. saphirina David 1954, S. signoreti Thomson 1858, S. subalutacea Pic 1953, S. villiersi David 1954. (2) Syntypes: Atalasis sagroides var. atricollis Pic 1934, A. sagroides var. bijuncta Pic 1934, A. sagroides var. postinnotata Pic 1948, A. sagroides var. postobliterata Pic 1948, A. sagroides var. ruficollis Pic 1934, Rhagiosoma fraternum Duvivier 1891 (3 ST), R. transactor Fairmaire 1903, Sagra deyrollei Thomson 1858, S. diversepunctata Pic 1938 (2 ST), S. donckieri Fairmaire 1903 (2 ST), S. longior Pic 1953 (2 ST), S. muelleriana Quedenfeldt 1888 (2 ST), S. nitida Pic 1938, S. nitida var. brevespinosa Pic 1938 (2 ST), S. nitidiventris Fairmaire 1891, S. oberthueri Duvivier 1891, S. perrieri Fairmaire 1898, S. petelii var. cyanescens Pic 1953 (2 ST), S. purpurea var. atricolor Pic 1953, S. purpurea var. jeanvoinei Pic 1953 (2 ST), S. suturalis Pic 1953 (2 ST), S. tibialis Fairmaire 1891. (3) Species labeled as types and proved to be manuscript names: Sagra cyanea Pic, S. cyaneoviolacea Pic, S. fulgida Weber var a Pic, and S. seguyi David. Two additional species were present under a name that was never published but actually belong to type series of described species: Sagra cyanea Pic is most likely the other syntype of S. petelii var. cyanescens Pic 1953; Sagra latipennis Pic is certainly a syntype of S. diversepunctata Pic 1938. (4) One specimen of Sagra cogoana Clavareau 1916 has been compared to the type. (5) Synonymy and new combinations. The genus Prionesthis Lacordaire 1845 is resurrected from synonymy with Megamerus MacLeay 1827 and the following new synonymy is proposed: Prionesthis Lacordaire 1845 = Rhagiosoma Chapuis 1878, syn. nov. Accordingly the following species are transferred to the genus Prionesthis: P. chapuisi (Sekerka 2007), comb. nov., P. fraternum (Duvivier 1891), comb. nov., P. grossus (Reineck 1913), comb. nov., P. madagascariensis (Chapuis 1878), comb. nov., P. obscurithorax (Pic 1914), comb. nov., P. transactor (Fairmaire 1903), comb. nov. The following new synonymies are proposed in the genus Sagra Fabricius 1792: S. bicolor Lacordaire 1845 = S. pici 1953, syn. nov.; S. congoana Clavareau 1916 = S. angolensis Pic 1939, syn. nov. = S. cribrosa Pic 1938, syn. nov.; S. ferox Baly 1877 = S. nitidiventris Fairmaire 1891, syn. nov. = S. longithorax Pic 1938, syn. nov.; S. fulgida Weber 1801 = S. minuta Pic 1930, syn. nov. = S. minuta var. insuturalis Pic 1953, syn. nov.; S. mouhoti Baly 1861 = S. suturalis Pic 1953, syn. nov.; S. odontopus Gistel 1831 = S. impressipennis Pic 1953, syn. nov. = S. petelii var. cyanescens Pic 1953, syn. nov.; S. senegalensis Klug 1835 = S. tibialis Fairmaire 1891, syn. nov.; S. tristis Fabricius 1798 = S. favareli Pic 1938, syn. nov. = S. favareli var. crampeli Pic 1938, syn. nov. = S. muelleriana Quedenfeldt 1888, syn. nov. = S. murrayi var. benitensis Pic 1938, syn. nov.; S. violacea (Olivier 1789) = S. descarpentriesi 1953, syn. nov. = S. deyrollei Thomson 1858, syn. nov. = S. habasi 1953, syn. nov. = S. jeanneli 1953, syn. nov. = S. longeciliata Pic 1938, syn. nov. = S. longefemoralis Pic 1938, syn. nov. = S. luctuosa Fairmaire 1887, syn. nov. = S. nitida Pic 1938, syn. nov. = S. nitida var. brevespinosa Pic 1938, syn. nov. = S. nitidissima Pic 1953, syn. nov. = S. saphirina David 1954, syn. nov. = S. villiersi David 1954, syn. nov.
10 spec., Lao collector lgt. (NMPC), 10.v.–16.vi.2009, 100 spec
  • Nam Kading
  • Tad Paloy Campsite
Nam Kading NPA, Tad Paloy campsite, 18°21–23′N, 104°09′E, 250–400 m, 24.–28.v.2011, 1 spec., M. Geiser, D. Hauck, A. Phantala & E. Vongphachan lgt. (NHMB). HOUAPHANH: Ban Saluei to Phou Pane Mt., 20°12.0–13.5′N, 103°59.5–104°01.0′E, 1340–1870 m, 15.iv.–15.v.2008, 10 spec., Lao collector lgt. (NMPC), 10.v.–16.vi.2009, 100 spec., M. Brancucci & local coll. lgt. (NHMB), 20°11–13′N, 103°59′–104°01′E, 1300–1900 m, 9.–17.vi.2009, 7 spec., M. Geiser lgt. (NHMB); Phou Pane Mt., 20°12′N, 104°01′E, 1500–1900 m, v.2007, 16 spec., Lao collector lgt. (NMPC), 17.v.–3.vi.2007, 9 spec., M. Brancucci lgt. (NHMB), 20°13′N, 104°00′E, 1350–1500 m, 1.–16.vi.2009, 44 spec., M. Brancucci lgt. (NHMB), 20°13′09–19″N, 103°59′54″–104°00′03″E, 1480–1550 m, 9.–16.vi.2009, 1 spec., D. Hauck lgt. (NHMB); Phu Loei, Ban Sakok N.P., 20°10′N 103°12′E, 23.–26.v.2001, 3 spec., J. Bezdìk lgt. (JBC). KHAMMUANE: Nakai-Nam Theun NPA, Ban Navang env., 17°57–59′N, 105°13–16′E, 600–750 m, 18.–21.v.2012, 1 spec., M.
  • Louang Prabang
Louang Prabang, ix.1917, 9 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (BMNH), 600 m, 20.vii.2003, 1 spec., 22.vii.2003, 1 spec., 6.viii.2003, 1 spec., 20.vi.2004, 1 spec., Šlachta lgt. (LSC);
1888, 1 spec., A. Pavie lgt. (IRSN); Ban Hou, 2 spec., x.1918, 1 spec
  • Louang Prabang
  • A Theng
Louang Prabang-A Theng, 1888, 1 spec., A. Pavie lgt. (IRSN); Ban Hou, 2 spec., x.1918, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC);
Vitalis de Salvaza lgt (NMPC) Thong Khang, 19°35′N, 101°58′E, 11.–21.v.2002, ca. 750 m, 5 spec
  • R Pak Neun
Pak Neun, 1 spec., R. Vitalis de Salvaza lgt. (NMPC); Thong Khang, 19°35′N, 101°58′E, 11.–21.v.2002, ca. 750 m, 5 spec., V. Kubáò lgt. (NHMB), 19°33–34′N, 101°57′E, 670–1160 m, 30.vi.–1.vii.2010, 1 spec., M.