Chapter

Agile Project Management

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Abstract

This chapter considers the major elements of agile project management as perceived through the lens of the DSDM Agile Project Framework (which is related to DSDM Agile Project Management though there are significant differences). The introduction of this framework forms the basis of discussions elsewhere in this book concerning how wider matters including governance, quality and risk ought to be tackled in the agile context (though other disciplines covered in this book such as configuration management feature less prominently in the DSDM Agile Project Framework). Owing to the existence of an extensive body of literature concerning specific practices and guidance it is not necessary here to delve into operational details. However, where appropriate the standard DSDM literature is complemented with wider perspectives (e.g., agile success factors, role conflicts and compatibilities, implicit self-organisation roles) so that even the reader already familiar with DSDM may yet discover some new insights.

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... Agility means creating and adapting to change (Cockburn & Highsmith, 2001), yet it is described as a transition procedure. Many writers have described Agile methodology, whereas Moran (2015) concept was selected for the study because it provides a basic outline of Agile methodology. Moran (2015) describes agile methodology as adapting to fast change via a feedback learning process that iteratively generates and gradually provides results. ...
... Many writers have described Agile methodology, whereas Moran (2015) concept was selected for the study because it provides a basic outline of Agile methodology. Moran (2015) describes agile methodology as adapting to fast change via a feedback learning process that iteratively generates and gradually provides results. Agile project management involves managing and implementing projects in lengthy bits of work known as iterations or sprints. ...
... Agile is commonly utilized in managing IT projects, but it may also be applied in non-IT projects. Figure 17 Agile Methodology (Moran, 2015) Agile beginnings are considered a reaction to the detriments of conventional approaches such as inconsistency, failures to handle new developments, and shifting client needs. The Agile manifesto and the accompanying twelve concepts were developed in 2001 by seventeen software experts in Snowbird, Utah. ...
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Thesis
MDXApp, or Student Campus Location Monitoring and GPS Checking System, is a cross-platform mobile application that allows students to mark attendance from their mobile phones. This program considers several factors in evaluating whether a student is physically present in class. A student’s identification is confirmed jointly by attendance code and real-time location. The application’s goal is to save class time while not incurring additional costs from purchasing any special peripheral devices. User authentication is one of the most important components of our proposed system. Every student’s unique user identification number is used to authenticate the user.
... eg. Agile Information Systems Development [4][39] [91] or Agile project management [63] [25]. Other area are explored, such as, IT infrastructure, IS development, IS organization, and IS personnel as described by Salmela et al [80] in a recent literature review. ...
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Preprint
Facing an environment increasingly complex, uncertain and changing, even in crisis, organizations are driven to be agile in order to survive. Agility, at the core heart of business strategy, represents the ability to grow in a competitive environment of continuous and unpredictable changes with information systems perceived as one of its main enablers. In other words, to be agile, organizations must be able to rely on agile enterprise information systems/information technology (IT/IS). Since, the agility needs are not the same among stakeholders, the objective of this research is to develop a conceptual model for the achievement and assessment of IT/IS agility from balanced perspectives to support agile organizations. Several researches have indicated that the IT balanced scorecard (BSC) approach is an appropriate technique for evaluating IT performance. This paper provides a balanced-scorecard based framework to evaluate the IS agility through four perspectives: business contribution, user orientation, operation excellence and innovation and competitiveness. The proposed framework, called IS Agility BSC, propose a three layer structure for each of the four perspectives: mission, key success factors, and agility evaluation criteria. According to this conceptual model, enterprise information systems agility is measured according to 14 agility key success factors, over the four BSC Perspectives, using 42 agility evaluation criteria that are identified based on literature survey methodology. This paper explores agility in the broader context of the enterprise information systems. The findings will provide, for both researchers and practitioners, a practical approach for achieving and measuring IS agility performance to support organizations in attempt to become agile as a new condition of surviving in the new business world.
... ere were many requirements and ideas that appear in every meeting with the Education Research International stakeholders at the university. Agile depends on iterations; in each iteration, a prototype is built and tested [33]. It is proved in many studies that fixing a defect/issue found in final production stages is more expensive than fixing it when found in earlier stages of the project [34]. ...
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Article
Nowadays, due to easiness and expansion in property of smart mobile devices, it is becoming inevitable for mobile applications to have an important role in higher education systems. The Egyptian public universities are facing the problem of students’ large number enrolled in each year. Thus, we lack proper communication between educators and learners. Mobile learning can solve that problem, and it enables adjustment of the curriculum to meet students' learning time and life situations. It provides different solutions better than traditional educational methods. Students and professors could exchange educational material or information even if they are not in the same class. Furthermore, the cost of universities’ materials reduced, as all course materials can be found online through mobile applications. This paper proposes a mobile learning system named “Easy-Edu.” The proposed system intended to make the learning process easier, focus on students’ needs, and encourage communication and collaboration between students and professors and supports collaborative scenario-based learning for university students. Unlike other traditional systems, the proposed “Easy-Edu” was built using an Agile-based approach that delivers sustainable and high-quality mobile learning system. In addition, it eliminates the chances of absolute system failure and detects and fixes issues faster. Summarily, everything related to the design and implementation of “Easy-Edu” is discussed.
... Also, Agile managers always are faced with the frequent changes asked by business party. They need to effectively managed to minimize wasted efforts [24]. Furthermore, Agile managers must promote Agile principles and practices within the development teams [14]. ...
... The concept of agility is applied to several research fields, like Agile project management [2] [6] or Agile Information Systems Development [3] [4][10] [13]. Other area are explored, such as, IT infrastructure [16], IS development [17], IS organization, and IS personnel as described by Salmela et al [9] in a recent literature review. ...
... eg. Agile Information Systems Development [4][39] [91] or Agile project management [63] [25]. Other area are explored, such as, IT infrastructure, IS development, IS organization, and IS personnel as described by Salmela et al [80] in a recent literature review. ...
Full-text available
Article
Facing an environment increasingly complex, uncertain and changing, even in crisis, organizations are driven to be agile in order to survive. Agility, at the core heart of business strategy, represents the ability to grow in a competitive environment of continuous and unpredictable changes with information systems perceived as one of its main enablers. In other words, to be agile, organizations must be able to rely on agile enterprise information systems/information technology (IT/IS). Since, the agility needs are not the same among stakeholders, the objective of this research is to develop a conceptual model for the achievement and assessment of IT/IS agility from balanced perspectives to support agile organizations. Several researches have indicated that the IT balanced scorecard (BSC) approach is an appropriate technique for evaluating IT performance. This paper provides a balanced-scorecard based framework to evaluate the IS agility through four perspectives: business contribution, user orientation, operation excellence and innovation and competitiveness. The proposed framework, called IS Agility BSC, propose a three layer structure for each of the four perspectives: mission, key success factors, and agility evaluation criteria. According to this conceptual model, enterprise information systems agility is measured according to 14 agility key success factors, over the four BSC perspectives, using 42 agility evaluation criteria that are identified based on literature survey methodology. This paper explores agility in the broader context of the enterprise information systems. The findings will provide, for both researchers and practitioners, a practical approach for achieving and measuring IS agility performance to support organizations in attempt to become agile as a new condition of surviving in the new business world.
Article
In the current competitive environment, Big Data Analytics (BDA) has become a prominent metric to reach an integrated, efficient, and effective supply chain (SC). In the literature, the BDA capabilities have been at the forefront of research in operational supply chain management (SCM), however, there has been a paucity of literature regarding its technical and organisational implementation in the industry. Hence, despite its capabilities and importance, many organisations are reluctant to adopt this promising concept in SC operations management, due to the ambiguity of its practical implementation from a technical and organisational point of view. To address this gap, this paper draws on agile project management, data mining model processing, and case study approaches to propose and test a framework for BDA organisational implementation in SCM. The feasibility of the proposed framework is illustrated and tested by a case study in an end-to-end SC within a large corporation. Our contribution lies in handling the organisational, managerial, and socio-technical challenges of BDA projects implementation in SCM.
Chapter
As global projects get more complex, virtual teams are established to bring together experts from different fields and cultures. Challenged by different work habits and communication patterns, these teams need fast and effective assessment of their teamwork to install efficient adjustments. In this chapter, the authors introduce an assessment for virtual teamwork based on the virtual team maturity model (VTMM®). The model focuses on internal team processes necessary to compensate for missing face-to-face communication. The VTMM® model defines meta-processes that help create a highly motivated virtual project team, leading to trust, cohesion, and consequently, an improved team performance. In a case study, the authors examine the effects of an VTMM® assessment and implementation of corresponding measures for improvement on virtual team performance. The outcomes are compared to the results of a recent survey on success and failure in virtual team maturity implementation, where project managers from different backgrounds and experience reported their practical observations.
Chapter
Im Beitrag wird nach der grundlegenden Beleuchtung der Vorteile und Herausforderungen von virtuellen Teams das prozessorientierte Reifegradmodell für virtuelle Teams – das Virtual Team Maturity Model (VTMM®) – vorgestellt und es wird das Erfassen von virtuellen Teamleistungen mit dem VTMM® erörtert. In einer Fallstudie wird die Anwendung des Reifegradmodells in einem Team, das von verschiedenen Standorten aus zusammenarbeitet, Schritt für Schritt erläutert, und es werden Möglichkeiten zur Leistungssteigerung aufgezeigt.
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Chapter
The agile project management approach offers many potential benefits in terms of alignment with business needs, flexibility and adaptability as well as a strong focus on the people dimension of projects. Agile has been applied in many industrial and government organisations, but how can it be adopted by higher education institutions? This chapter provides an initial answer to this question through exploring how agile techniques can be applied to improve the performance at universities in regard to research, education and knowledge-exchange operations. This is supported by a review of agile project management, including the main features and guiding principles as well as evaluation of the scope for agile to make a positive impact on performance at universities. The chapter also includes description of three illustrative case study investigations that identify there are significant opportunities for agile management to be applied to various types of projects at higher education institutions. The cases include identification of the initial system requirements to support implementation of the relevant agile technique on appropriate infrastructure. The cases reveal that adoption of agile management would support more open forms of communication leading to improved knowledge sharing and trust-based working at universities.
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