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Chapter-17 Sphincter Saving Surgery for Cancer Lower Rectum with Special Emphasis on Abdominosacral Resection

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... However, the disadvantages are the need to change patient position, the inconvenience of the lateral position, and the need to divide the levator ani muscles. Unfamiliarity with this technique and morbidity from commonly observed sacral wound dehiscence [14] make this a less popular option. ...
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Safe access to the lower rectum is of the utmost importance when performing sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. We describe an abdominoanterior sagittal approach for low anterior resection in females. The abdominal part of the procedure is similar to conventional low anterior resection. The perineal part includes making an anterior sagittal incision from the posterior fourchette to the anterior edge of the anus. The use of a muscle stimulator allows identification of the external sphincters. The rectum and both puborectal slings are identified. Lower margin division and completion of total mesorectal excision is done from below, under vision. The specimen is delivered and mobilized colon is brought down, a hand-sewn end-to-end colorectal anastomosis is formed, and a diverting colostomy is fashioned. Seven patients underwent low anterior resection via the abdominoanterior sagittal approach. Two patients (29%) developed anastomotic stricture, one in association with a rectovaginal fistula and still had a defunctioning stoma, while the other responded to dilatation. The six patients who underwent stoma closure achieved continence to solid stools with a mean Kelly score of 5. The abdominoanterior sagittal approach for low anterior resection is an alternative option for sphincter-saving resection in female patients as it defines the sphincteric anatomy, and minimizes the risk of sphincter injury.
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