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Just Space: Towards a just, sustainable London

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This chapter discusses the London-based organisation Just Space, outlining how it emerged in 2007 to challenge issues of social injustice and the London-wide policies about urban regeneration and economic and environmental sustainability. It argues for the need to rebalance both debate and policy on London's future in ways in which the focus of politicians should be on those who are excluded from access to decent housing, employment, and good quality public services and spaces. The main goal of Just Space is to provide a community voice or forum to articulate ideas about realistic alternatives to neoliberalism, and to develop ways of organising London's society to avoid pricing people out of housing and other facilities in low-income communities.

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... In the longer term, the extension of the reach of land value capture to encompass long-term benefits to developers, landowners and investors, as well as homeowners, would relieve pressure on the design of the built environment to fund urban development (Transport for London, 2017; Just Space, 2018). We suggest that rather than adopting relatively defeatist post-political perspectives (Swyngedouw, 2005;Raco, 2014), conducting a nuanced analysis and debate about the politics of urban development across London, in concert with building coalitions beyond numerous isolated community struggles, could help shift attention to the potential for transformation in state practices (Brown et al., 2014;Lees, 2014;Lipietz et al., 2014). ...
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... Where group work was involved, the size of student groups was mentioned by a number of authors as contributing to the potential success/failure of a SEA (e.g. Roakes & Norris-Tirrell, 2000; Brown et al., 2014). Related to this is the level of student autonomy and decision-making vis-a-vis tutor guidance. ...
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Chapter
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