Interorganizational collaboration and value creation in digital government projects

Conference Paper · May 2015with 49 Reads
DOI: 10.1145/2757401.2757403
Conference: the 16th Annual International Conference
Abstract
The importance of IT collaboration between government agencies and private organizations has been already identified in the literature. However, there is still a gap about the determinants of success of such collaborations. Using survey data, we look at the impact of the resources and processes of the public entity in delivering public value for private public IT collaborations in the context of Mexico, and the moderating role of collaboration with the private sector and with other public organizations in both causal relationships. Our results show that internal processes of the public entity have a positive impact on public value creation in their IT projects, while internal resources have no effect. Collaboration with the private sector moderates negatively the effect of internal resources on public value creation, and moderates positively the effect of internal processes on public value creation. Inter-organizational collaboration within other public sector organizations, on the other hand, moderates positively the relationship between internal resources and public value creation, and does not moderate the relationship between internal processes and public value creation.
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