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Abstract

Environmental crimes are a serious and growing international concern as they cause significant harm to the environment and human health. Establishing environmental offences as international crimes would be a way to end with impunity as no country, no company and no individual would easily be able to escape from international criminal justice. As environmental offences do not yet fall under the scope of crimes against humanity, a new “core crime”—ecocide—should be introduced into the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. This hypothetical scenario will have an important repercussion: individuals in a position of superior or command responsibility, such as CEOs, will be criminally liable if they carry out an activity that harms the environment.

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What makes crimes against humanity crimes against humanity? Legal Studies Research Paper Series Working Paper No
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