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Decision Theory under Risk and Applications in Social Sciences: I. Individual Decision Making

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Introduction The Fundamental Framework A Brief Introduction to Theory of Choice Collective Choice Preferences Under Uncertainty Decisions Over Time The Problem of Aggregation Conclusion

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I am grateful to Joseph B. Kadane for numerous constructive suggestions offered during discussions of this research. The financial sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Transportation through grant DOT-OS-4006 is also acknowledged. The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are solely those of the author.
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