Conference Paper

VizTrails

Authors:
  • GESIS - Leibniz Institute of the Social Sciences
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Abstract

Understanding the way people move through urban areas represents an important problem that has implications for a range of societal challenges such as city planning, public transportation, or crime analysis. In this paper, we present an interactive visualization tool called VizTrails for exploring and understanding such human movement. It features visualizations that show aggregated statistics of trails for geographic areas that correspond to grid cells on a map, e.g., on the number of users passing through or on cells commonly visited next. Amongst other features, system allows to overlay the map with the results of SPARQL queries in order to relate the observed trajectory statistics with its geo-spatial context, e.g., considering a city's points of interest. The systems functionality is demonstrated using trajectory examples extracted from the social photo sharing platform Flickr. Overall, VizTrails facilitates deeper insights into geo-spatial trajectory data by enabling interactive exploration of aggregated statistics and providing geo-spatial context.

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Photowalking the city: Comparing hypotheses about urban photo trails on flickr. 2015. under review http
  • M Becker
  • P Singer
  • F Lemmerich
  • A Hotho
  • D Helic
  • M Strohmaier