Abbreviated POMS Questionnaire (items and scoring key)

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PLEASE CONTINUE WITH THE ITEMS ON THE NEXT PAGE
Abbreviated POMS (Revised Version)
Name: Date:
Below is a list of words that describe feelings people have. Please CIRCLE THE NUMBER
THAT BEST DESCRIBES HOW YOU FEEL RIGHT NOW.
Not At All A Little Moderately Quite a lot Extremely
Tense 0 1 2 3 4
Angry 0 1 2 3 4
Worn Out 0 1 2 3 4
Unhappy 0 1 2 3 4
Proud 0 1 2 3 4
Lively 0 1 2 3 4
Confused 0 1 2 3 4
Sad 0 1 2 3 4
Active 0 1 2 3 4
On-edge 0 1 2 3 4
Grouchy 0 1 2 3 4
Ashamed 0 1 2 3 4
Energetic 0 1 2 3 4
Hopeless 0 1 2 3 4
Uneasy 0 1 2 3 4
Restless 0 1 2 3 4
Unable to concentrate 0 1 2 3 4
Fatigued 0 1 2 3 4
Competent 0 1 2 3 4
Annoyed 0 1 2 3 4
Discouraged 0 1 2 3 4
Resentful 0 1 2 3 4
Nervous 0 1 2 3 4
Miserable 0 1 2 3 4
Copyright © 1993
J.R. Grove, PhD
The University of Western Australia
Not At All A Little Moderately Quite a lot Extremely
Confident 0 1 2 3 4
Bitter 0 1 2 3 4
Exhausted 0 1 2 3 4
Anxious 0 1 2 3 4
Helpless 0 1 2 3 4
Weary 0 1 2 3 4
Satisfied 0 1 2 3 4
Bewildered 0 1 2 3 4
Furious 0 1 2 3 4
Full of Pep 0 1 2 3 4
Worthless 0 1 2 3 4
Forgetful 0 1 2 3 4
Vigorous 0 1 2 3 4
Uncertain about things 0 1 2 3 4
Bushed 0 1 2 3 4
Embarrassed 0 1 2 3 4
THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION
PLEASE BE SURE YOU HAVE ANSWERED EVERY ITEM
Citation:
Grove, J.R., & Prapavessis, H. (1992). Preliminary evidence
for the reliability and validity of an abbreviated Profile of Mood
States. International Journal of Sport Psychology, 23, 93-109.
Abbreviated POMS (Revised Version)
*** SCORING KEY ***
Scores for the seven subscales in the abbreviated POMS are calculated by summing the
numerical ratings for items that contribute to each subscale. The correspondence between items
and subscales is shown below.
Item Scale
Not At All A Little Moderate Quite a lot Extremely
Tense TEN 0 1 2 3 4
Angry ANG 0 1 2 3 4
Worn Out FAT 0 1 2 3 4
Unhappy DEP 0 1 2 3 4
Proud ERA 0 1 2 3 4
Lively VIG 0 1 2 3 4
Confused CON 0 1 2 3 4
Sad DEP 0 1 2 3 4
Active VIG 0 1 2 3 4
On-edge TEN 0 1 2 3 4
Grouchy ANG 0 1 2 3 4
Ashamed ERA Reverse-score this item [0 = 4, 1 = 3, 2 = 2, 3 = 1, 4 = 0]
Energetic VIG 0 1 2 3 4
Hopeless DEP 0 1 2 3 4
Uneasy TEN 0 1 2 3 4
Restless TEN 0 1 2 3 4
Can’t concentrate CON 0 1 2 3 4
Fatigued FAT 0 1 2 3 4
Competent ERA 0 1 2 3 4
Annoyed ANG 0 1 2 3 4
Discouraged DEP 0 1 2 3 4
Resentful ANG 0 1 2 3 4
Nervous TEN 0 1 2 3 4
Miserable DEP 0 1 2 3 4
Copyright © 1993-1999, J.R. Grove, PhD
The University of Western Australia
Item Scale
Not At All A Little Moderate Quite a lot Extremely
Confident ERA 0 1 2 3 4
Bitter ANG 0 1 2 3 4
Exhausted FAT 0 1 2 3 4
Anxious TEN 0 1 2 3 4
Helpless DEP 0 1 2 3 4
Weary FAT 0 1 2 3 4
Satisfied ERA 0 1 2 3 4
Bewildered CON 0 1 2 3 4
Furious ANG 0 1 2 3 4
Full of Pep VIG 0 1 2 3 4
Worthless DEP 0 1 2 3 4
Forgetful CON 0 1 2 3 4
Vigorous VIG 0 1 2 3 4
Uncertain… CON 0 1 2 3 4
Bushed FAT 0 1 2 3 4
Embarrassed ERA Reverse-score this item [0 = 4, 1 = 3, 2 = 2, 3 = 1, 4 = 0]
TEN = Tension Note that 2 of the items on the Esteem-related
Affect (ERA) subscale are reverse-scored prior
to being combined with the other items.
Total Mood Disturbance (TMD) is calculated
by summing the totals for the negative
subscales and then subtracting the totals for the
positive subscales:
TMD = [TEN+DEP+ANG+FAT+CON] –
[VIG+ERA].
A constant (e.g., 100) can be added to the TMD
formula in order to eliminate negative scores.
ANG = Anger
FAT = Fatigue
DEP = Depression
ERA = Esteem-related Affect
VIG = Vigour
CON = Confusion
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