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(Re)Discovering University Autonomy: The Global Market Paradox of Stakeholder and Educational Values in Higher Education

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Abstract

Governments in all parts of the world are engaged in the radical reform and reshaping of higher education to achieve economic, social, and political objectives. They recognize that they need higher education institutions with greater autonomy and more freedom to help realize their goals; the challenge is to define university autonomy in a way that will best meet the needs of governments, higher education institutions, and other stakeholders. Turcan, Reilly, and Bugaian have developed a new and critical understanding of institutional university autonomy by bringing together original case studies based on a holistic view of the topic. The authors evaluate institutional university autonomy by introducing five interfaces that characterize external and internal interactions between modern universities and their key stakeholders. By addressing modern challenges to university autonomy in Europe and beyond in a new and innovative way, (Re)Discovering University Autonomy has far-reaching implications for leaders and managers, researchers, educators, practitioners, and policy makers.
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9781137393821
Nov 2015
£75.00
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$138.00CAN
(Re)Discovering University Autonomy
The Global Market Paradox of Stakeholder and Educational
Values in Higher Education
Edited By Romeo V. Turcan, John E. Reilly and Larisa Bugaian
Coming November 2015
About the book
Governments in all parts of the world are engaged in the radical reform and reshaping of higher
education to achieve economic, social, and political objectives. They recognize that they need
higher education institutions with greater autonomy and more freedom to help realize their
goals; the challenge is to define university autonomy in a way that will best meet the needs of
governments, higher education institutions, and other stakeholders.
Turcan, Reilly, and Bugaian have developed a new and critical understanding of institutional
university autonomy by bringing together original case studies based on a holistic view of the
topic. The authors evaluate institutional university autonomy by introducing five interfaces that
characterize external and internal interactions between modern universities and their key
stakeholders. By addressing modern challenges to university autonomy in Europe and beyond in a
new and innovative way,
(Re)Discovering University Autonomy
has far-reaching implications for
leaders and managers, researchers, educators, practitioners, and policy makers.
Romeo V. Turcan is Associate Professor
of International Business and
Entrepreneurship at Aalborg University,
Denmark.
John E. Reilly is an independent Higher
Education Consultant based in the UK.
Larisa Bugaian is Professor of
Economics and Management and Vice-
Rector of Research at the Technical
University of Moldova.
"The demands on universitiesand the
threats to university autonomyhave
never been greater than they are today.
Drawing on contributions from European
and North American writers, this
thought-provoking book demonstrates
the scale of the challenge faced by
universities and develops a model of
institutional university autonomy that
befits the modern sector."
- Sara Carter, Order of the British
Empire, Professor and Associate Deputy
Principal, University of Strathclyde, UK
... The promotion of university autonomy to implement the process of modernization in higher education has become embedded in policy rhetoric, even though government intervention in recent years has tended to override and restrict university autonomy (Bowen and Schwartz, 2016;Reilly et al., 2016a). Authoritarianism, supernaturalism, corporatism, illiberalism, and political correctness are among the key impediments, idea-vetting systems, or enemies to university autonomy (Bowen and Schwartz, 2016). ...
Article
In this ‘Speaking Out’ paper, we challenge contemporary orthodoxies in the field of ‘advanced structural’ internationalization of universities by focusing on significant, but neglected issues and challenges which arise from the current substantive developments in this field. By referring to ‘advanced structural’ internationalization, we want to distinguish between what might be broadly defined as internationalization at home and internationalization abroad, which we consider ‘structural’. ‘Advanced structural’ precisely because it involves transporting and re-engineering relations with governments, partners, students and other stakeholders and tends to be high risk, high commitment and high cost. We ‘look’ at ‘advanced structural’ internationalization through the theoretical lenses of university autonomy. Since there is limited research at the intersection of international business and university autonomy, along with our experience, we draw on publicly available data relating to issues and challenges which arise from the pursuit of ‘advanced structural’ internationalization in higher education to construct an analytical narrative and ethical discourse appropriate to the radically changing structural, theoretical and ideological realities we now face in this field. ‘Advanced structural’ internationalization poses serious ethical questions, which suggest that it does not have strong ethical foundations. In this conclusion, we are influenced by the degree of difference between university autonomy settings at home and the operation in the host country. The greater the disparity the more it is likely that the standards and practices which would be applied in the home environment fail to apply in the host. Hence, our thesis: ‘advanced structural’ internationalization of universities is unethical.
... The extant AAU PBL model is summarized in Fig. 16.3. The Holistic PBL model I put forward (Fig. 16.5) 3 builds on personal observations, experience in engaging in PBL research-based teaching and teaching-based research (Fig. 16.4) and findings from my action research in policy, institutional, and organizational interventions in two EU-funded capacity-building projects (e.g., Turcan and Bugaian 2015;Turcan et al. 2016), as well as on the revised Bloom's Taxonomy (Anderson et al. 2001). ...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter puts forward a Holistic Problem Based Learning (HPBL) model that integrates research-based teaching and learning and teaching-based research, and redefines the PBL process. It builds on the Aalborg University PBL model that has been part of the Aalborg University DNA since the university inception in 1974 and the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy to redefine the PBL process. I reflect on my personal experience in engaging with PBL from the moment I started my full-time position at Aalborg University in 2010. Before discussing HPBL, I set the stage by a review of the ‘liquid times’ we live in, highlighting the impact of newness and uncertainty—quintessential by-products of these ‘liquid times’—on collective behaviour, free will, ascertaining what the future holds for our graduates, and conjecturing how to mitigate these challenges. As part of the HPBL discussion, I introduce the basic principles, pillars a PBL model rests on. I conclude by underlining pointers for future research, policy and practice.
... However, one of the limiting elements of PIEDD projection nowadays is its insufficient internationalization, which we are confident to overcome in the short term, since we are aware that this limitation has a negative impact on our university autonomy, according to the lucid explanation of Turcan and Gulieva (2016). Indeed, most of our R & D projects and technology transfer contracts are confined to the Spanish country, which determines the size and scope of our objectives. ...
Article
Full-text available
To continue fulfilling the imperative need to generate and transfer knowledge and innovation, universities must meet the growing demands of a society that is undergoing an unstoppable process of global digital migration. In this sense, since its creation in 2009 to the present, the Platform for Innovation and Experimentation in Digital Diversity (PIEDD)of the University of Santiago de Compostelahas carried out R&D projects in technology innovation and vocational training in the context of design, generation and management of all kinds of digital content, which constitutes a pioneering experience of collaboration between almost one hundred prestigious researchers working from as heterogeneous and concomitant disciplinary fields as computer sciences, ICT, applied physics, mathematics, journalism and audio-visual communication and advertising.
Chapter
This chapter builds upon empirical material and our experiences in universities for more than 35 years, mainly in business economics, from Aalborg University and universities in the USA. The content arises from analyses of those experiences and reflections on what education has become, what the problems are and what it should and/or could be. We have been teaching, supervising, building programmes, members of study boards, programme coordinators and administrators of programmes. Our experiences are from the everyday of life in those programmes and from being a part of the political, strategic discussions of teaching and universities programmes. It is all about politics and engagement. Since the mid/late 1980s, there has been, from a political view, a desire to have more control over the universities. This stems from the cost of public universities, to ensure that they become more focused on economic growth, production and innovation. This has had an influence on programmes, content, which programmes, the number of students and assessment. This has created a contradiction between the political management of universities and the idea of what universities should or could be in relation to engagement, quality of education and self-development of the students. These challenges and contradictions are discussed in the chapter. We then make a case for theory and philosophy of science as a mitigating response to such incongruences.
Chapter
This chapter reflects on the transformation of higher education institutions in the USA over the past decades in the context of the ascendance of neoliberal governance and management. It provides analytical as well as practical perspectives on how to comprehend, engage with, and ameliorate the current crisis of higher education. We first establish the social functions of higher education in modern liberal public life. We posit the ideological traits of neoliberalism as a new governance and management that bends and reshapes the higher education system. It reconfigures the curriculum, educational content, and the social/cultural life of the universities in three basic ways: from non-market to all-market forms, from exchange processes to competitive processes, and view of the market from a ‘natural’ to an ‘ideal’ (indeed, imperative and essential) form. These transformations ripple through administrative/economic dispositions that alter the work processes and work conditions at universities. These changes affect all aspects of universities: the governing bodies, the faculty or academy, students, and entities external to the university. Finally, we discuss ameliorative paths for recovering and restoring the public functions of the higher education system for social progress.
Chapter
The following sections shall provide some critical reflections on the key trends, debates, and challenges covered in the preceding chapters. As should be clear from the previous analysis, the present study is not intended to be a demolition exercise. The point of this epilogue, therefore, is not to demonstrate that the sociological approaches scrutinized in the foregoing chapters are doomed to failure. Rather, the point here is to shed light on their main weaknesses and limitations, which―regardless of their respective strengths and contributions―need to be taken into consideration when examining crucial developments in twenty-first-century sociology. As the preceding inquiry has sought to illustrate, the project of creating a sociology capable of accounting for the interconnectedness of social actors and social structures across time and space is far from straightforward. Indeed, the task of constructing a cutting-edge twenty-first-century discipline of this sort is fraught with difficulties. Building on the insights from the previous investigation, this epilogue shall draw attention to the complexities and contradictions inherent in, and to the major challenges arising from, such an ambitious endeavour.
Chapter
Full-text available
Many studies have seen Vietnam’s higher education as a highly centralised system. However, this chapter—through the analysis of community colleges—seeks to challenge this traditional viewpoint. Since Doi Moi 1986, decentralisation in social, economic, and political realms has no less powerfully penetrated into higher education. Based on the review of existing studies on Vietnamese community colleges, as well as interviews with colleges’ administrators, we argue that the emergence and development of community colleges in contemporary Vietnam clearly indicates the higher education decentralisation. Unlike in many other countries, however, the Vietnamese central government tends to be retreating significantly during this decentralisation process. The chapter concludes with some potential challenges that these colleges may soon encounter.
Chapter
Focusing on the continuous efforts of implementing English as Medium of Instruction (EMI) in education policy amid internationalisation of higher education institutions (HEIs) in Vietnam, Noorashid provides a commentary that reviews major key issues involving significant stakeholders in HEIs across Vietnam, namely: senior managers, educators, and students. Although Vietnam has clear aspirations to improve the national economy and its education quality, there are still a number of mismatches between theoretical expectations of EMI and the actual enactment in pedagogy that need to be addressed immediately. Noorashid further compares the EMI policy, practices, and pedagogical issues raised in Vietnam with HEIs in Brunei Darussalam—where EMI is also experiencing substantial shifts in its education system. While the comparative analysis between EMI in Vietnam and Brunei has shown some similar and contrasting features, Noorashid further raises the possibility of more collaborative efforts in addressing EMI issues in both countries.
Article
Full-text available
Cómo citar este artículo en bibliografias / Referencia E CastellóMayoCastellóMayo, A López Gómez, R Méndez Fernández (2019): "La transferencia de conocimiento desde la universidad innovadora. Un modelo de gestión de la información en el contexto digital: el caso de estudio PIEDD". Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 74, pp. 537 a 553. La transferencia de conocimiento desde la universidad innovadora. Un modelo de gestión de la información en el contexto digital: el caso de estudio PIEDD Knowledge transfer from the innovative university. A model of information management in the digital context: the PIEDD case study Enrique Castelló Mayo [CV] [ ORCID] [ GS] Profesor. Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, USC (España) enrique.castello@usc.es Antía López Gómez [CV] [ ORCID] [ GS] Profesor. Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, USC, (España) antiamaria.lopez@usc.es Roi Méndez Fernández [CV] [ ORCID] [ GS]. Profesor interino. Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, USC, (España) roi.mendez@usc.es Abstracts Para seguir cumpliendo con la imperiosa necesidad de generar y transferir conocimiento e innovación, las universidades deben cumplir con las crecientes demandas de una sociedad que está experimentando un imparable proceso de migración digital mundial. En este sentido, desde su creación en 2009 hasta la actualidad, la Plataforma para la Innovación y Experimentación en Diversidad Digital (PIEDD) de la Universidad de Santiago de Compostela ha desarrollado proyectos de I + D en el entorno de la innovación tecnológica y la formación profesional en el contexto del diseño, generación y gestión de todo tipo de contenido digital, lo que avala una experiencia precursora de colaboración entre casi un centenar de prestigiosos investigadores que trabajan en los campos disciplinarios heterogéneos y concomitantes como la informática, NTIC, física aplicada, matemáticas, periodismo y comunicación audiovisual y publicidad. [EN] To continue fulfilling the imperative need to generate and transfer knowledge and innovation, universities must meet the growing demands of a society that is undergoing an unstoppable process of global digital migration. In this sense, since its creation in 2009 to the present, the Platform for Innovation and Experimentation in Digital Diversity (PIEDD) of the University of Santiago de Compostela has carried out R&D projects in technology innovation and vocational training in the context of design, generation and management of all kinds of digital content, which constitutes a pioneering experience of collaboration between almost one hundred prestigious researchers working RLCS, Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 74-Páginas 537 a 553 [Investigación Financiada] |
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