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Abstract

Conflict management skills are invaluable not only in the workplace but for life in general. I have identified a series of movie clips that connect with the students and aid in bringing the theory to practice. The documentary Metallica: Some Kind of Monster shows the metal band Metallica producing an album and the many conflicts that ensued during the 2-year process. The somewhat unorthodox setting helps capture the attention of the students. This article describes a lecture and discussion guide that I use in an undergraduate management class. It can be easily used in an organizational behavior, leadership, or team class and also in a master’s-level class.

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... Films are made to be engaging, and thus whole films or video clips provide examples that are engaging places for students to apply classroom concepts they learn (Cannon & Doyle, 2020;Oliver & Reynolds, 2010;Urick & Sprinkle, 2019). Films have been used in a wide variety of management classrooms, including human resource relevant concepts and classes (Quijada, 2016;Taylor & Provitera, 2011). ...
... The genre of documentary films has been highlighted by some as a particularly useful vein for use in the classroom, with it providing real-world examples for students to analyze, thus highlighting the relevance of class topics to real-world events (Quijada, 2016;Schmidt, 2015). Documentaries allow students to consider what happened in real situations and how those situations were impacted by the ideas they learn in the classroom. ...
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Sumario: What culture is and does -- The dimensions of culture -- How to study and interpret culture -- The role leadership in building culture -- The evolution of culture and leadership -- Learning cultures and learning leaders
Metallica some kind of monster [Motion Picture]. United States: Paramount Home Video
  • J Berlinger
  • B Sinofsky
Berlinger, J. (Producer, Director), & Sinofsky, B. (Director). (2004). Metallica some kind of monster [Motion Picture]. United States: Paramount Home Video.
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Schermerhorn, J. R. (2013). Management (12th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley.
Beyond the paper chase
  • S C Seyforth
  • C M Golde
Seyforth, S. C., & Golde, C. M. (2001). Beyond the paper chase. About Campus, 6(4), 2.
Producer, Director), & Sinofsky, B. (Director)
  • J Berlinger
Berlinger, J. (Producer, Director), & Sinofsky, B. (Director). (2004). Metallica some kind of monster [Motion Picture]. United States: Paramount Home Video.