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Analyse des abandons prématurés lors d’un accompagnement a la validation des acquis de l’expérience (V.A.E.): une recherche empirique

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Abstract

Si les dispositifs d’accompagnement à la VAE (Validation des Acquis de l’Expérience) connaissent actuellement un certain succès, beaucoup de candidats tendent à abandonner la procédure sans que l’on puisse en connaître les causes précises. La présente recherche s’appuie sur un échantillon de 162 personnes qui se sont engagées à différents stades dans le dispositif. La comparaison entre les personnes ayant abandonné et celles ayant poursuivi leur VAE porte sur le sentiment d’efficacité générale, le soutien social professionnel et personnel, l’autodétermination et les difficultés rencontrées lors de l’accompagnement. Une analyse discriminante menée entre les décrocheurs et les poursuivants ainsi que les propositions des participants permettent d’identifier les variables clés et d’effectuer des recommandations pour améliorer l’accompagnement à la VAE.

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