Book

New developments in economic education

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Abstract

This innovative book offers targeted strategies for effectively and efficiently teaching economics at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. It provides professors and other teachers of economics various techniques to engage and retain the interest of students, and challenges them to apply both knowledge and methodological tools to a range of economic problems. © Franklin G. Mixon, Jr and Richard J. Cebula 2014. All rights reserved.
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Book
“Expanding Teaching and Learning Horizons in Economic Education” offers 17 richly unique and interesting essays covering many of the subjects that are currently being examined in academic journals of this genre. Divided into three sections - research, pedagogy and information about the economic education profession - this volume offers insights on current debates over economic literacy, standardized test performance, the impact of gender, class attendance and homework policies on course performance and classroom cheating. Also recognizing interest in the use of literature, sports, and popular culture to enhance classroom presentation of economics, this volume offers a number of chapters dealing with the use of books, motion pictures, professional sports and television cartoons to capture students’ interests in economics. In providing these essays, this book brings together several notable scholars in the field of economic education, including William B. Walstad of the University of Nebraska, associate editor of the Journal of Economic Education, G. Dirk Mateer of Pennsylvania State University, author of Economics in the Movies, and Kim Marie McGoldrick of the University of Richmond, member of the editorial boards of The American Economist, Journal of Economic Education and the Journal of Economics & Finance Education. Complete with a Foreword by Rand W. Ressler, co-author of the popular economics text “Economics: Private Markets and Public Choice”, this volume brings the research and ideas of several of the leading scholars in economic education together in one place.
Article
This article demonstrates the parallels between Bellamy's fictional society in Looking Backward and Schumpeter's socialist blueprint Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy. The socialist system Joseph Schumpeter describes is nearly identical to that in Edward Bellamy's utopia. Because Bellamy's society is a concrete one set within the readable confines of a novel, it provides a useful benchmark for students analyzing Schumpeter.
Article
West V i r p a University Getting students to understand the economic way of thinking might be the most difficult aspect of a teaching economist's job. The counterintuitive nature of economics often makes it difficult to get the average student to think "like an economist." T o this end, the need to keep students engaged and interested is essential when teaching economic principles and interdisciplinaly approaches to engaging students are becoming increasingly common. For example, Leet and Houser (2003) build an entire principles class around classic films and documentaries while Watts (1 999) discusses how literary passages can be used to teach a typical undergraduate course more effectively. I further extend this interdisciplinary approach to economic education by providing examples from the long-running animated television show The Simpsons that can be used to stimulate student discussion and engagement in an introductory course in microeconomics. Using The Simpsons in the classroom The bulk of this paper describes scenes from The Simpsons that illustrate basic economic concepts. While the examples are pretty straightforward, the difficulty in using The Simpsons lies in deciding: where to place the examples into the lecture and the best way to present the scene to the students. " The author gratefully acknowledges the Lnancial support of The Buckeye Institute.
Article
Instructors for introductory courses with large enrollments must routinely work to curb cheating during exams. A method used for such purposes is described here. Perhaps more interesting than the method's effectiveness is the inherited ability to draw inference on unknown parameters of interest, including the proportion of students who cheat (as opposed to guess) when faced with not knowing how to obtain the solution to a multiple-choice exam question. For estimation we consider the method of maximum likelihood.
Article
The purpose of this study was to compare two teaching methods: Method One (control), a conventional lecture textbook method; and Method Two (experimental), one based on current event readings with lectures and class discussions. This study was also designed to show any discoverable improvement in students’ understanding in junior college economics attributable to the teaching method and whether such learning is influenced by the personality dimensions of the teachers or students, students’ age, sex, high school grade point average, previous economic education, interest or lack of interest in economics, the course being required or elected, Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) score in math, Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) score in verbal skills, combined math and verbal SAT scores, or major course of study.