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Physopleurella floridana Blatchley, 1925, a synonym of Physopleurella mundula (White, 1877) (Hemiptera : Heteroptera : Cimicoidea : Anthocordiae)

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... Members of this genus may often inhabit dead-leaf habitats. Collection records include dead leaves of palmetto, cane, fan-flower, and banana; dead leaves of evergreen trees; dried leaves of hula skirts; and nests of weaverbirds (Usinger 1946(Usinger , 1951Lattin 2005b;Yamada & Hirowatari 2007b;Jung & Lee 2011b). Psocids in these habitats may be preferred prey (Swezey 1905;Lattin 2005b). ...
... Collection records include dead leaves of palmetto, cane, fan-flower, and banana; dead leaves of evergreen trees; dried leaves of hula skirts; and nests of weaverbirds (Usinger 1946(Usinger , 1951Lattin 2005b;Yamada & Hirowatari 2007b;Jung & Lee 2011b). Psocids in these habitats may be preferred prey (Swezey 1905;Lattin 2005b). Interceptions included specimens of 2 species from Guyana, Haiti, and the Philippines (Table 2). ...
... Interceptions included specimens of 2 species from Guyana, Haiti, and the Philippines (Table 2). Physopleurella mundula (White, 1877) was intercepted at the Miami Airport on flowers and on palmetto leaves in luggage; this species is known to occur in Florida, probably as an introduction (Lattin 2005b). According to Lattin (2005b), P. mundula has also been intercepted at airports in Philadelphia (from Mexico) and New Orleans (from Honduras). ...
Article
Specimens of Anthocoridae, Lyctocoridae, and Lasiochilidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) intercepted at various ports-of-entry and housed at the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) Miami Plant Inspection Station (Miami, FL) were examined and identified to species or genus. The collection comprised 127 specimens intercepted primarily at the Miami Inspection Station. Specimens were distributed among 14 genera and 26 identified species in 3 families: Anthocoridae (99 specimens), Lyctocoridae (9 specimens), and Lasiochilidae (19 specimens). Seventy-eight of the 127 specimens could be identified to species. The remaining 49 specimens were identified to genus, except for 2 specimens that could not be identified below tribal level. For each identified species, we provide brief descriptions of habitat and prey preferences (where known), and a summary of currently known geographic range. Fifty-six of the 127 specimens were of a single genus: Orius Wolff, 1811 (Anthocoridae: Oriini). The specimens of Orius comprised at least 9 different species; 17 specimens could not be identified to species. The 127 specimens were intercepted on a variety of commodities, including ornamental plants, cut flowers, bouquets, agricultural produce, ceramic tiles, and wood products. Fourteen of the identified species do not currently occur in the continental U.S.; moreover, the 49 specimens that we could identify only to genus very likely also are of species not currently established in the continental U.S. The majority of intercepted specimens (93 of 127) arrived on shipments from the Neotropics and Europe. Specimens of Lasiochilidae and Scolopini (Anthocoridae) were entirely from shipments arriving from the Neotropical region. Specimens of Orius were intercepted on shipments from the Neotropics, Mexico, Europe, and Sub-Saharan Africa. Finally, 10 species were intercepted on shipments arriving from countries not previously listed as being part of their known geographic ranges. One Old World species, Cardiastethus affinis Poppius, 1909, known previously only from East Africa and India, was intercepted in 2 separate shipments arriving from Central America and the West Indies.
... The genus Physopleurella Reuter, 1884, belonging to the tribe Dufouriellini of the family Anthocoridae, is represented by 16 species known from the Old World tropics and subtropics, with the single exception of P. mundula (White, 1877) occurring in Central and South America and the Pacific islands (see Carpintero 2002;Lattin 2005;Yamada and Hirowatari 2007). This genus is characterized by a short and robust labrum, hardly surpassing the anterior margin of the prosternum, longitudinal grooves on the pronotal callus, a posteriorly curved ostiolar peritreme which does not join the fine carina that extends to the anterior margin of the metapleuron, an enlarged fore femur with a series of spines on its ventral surface, and an arched, curved fore tibia with a row of appressed short setae along the entire length of its ventral surface (see Reuter 1884;Gross 1954;Yamada and Hirowatari 2007). ...
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The genus Physopleurella Reuter, 1884 is recorded from Indonesia for the first time, represented by four species, including one new species from east-ern Java, Bali, and Flores. They are P. pessoni Carayon, 1956, P. nigrifemora Yamada and Hirowatari, 2007, P. striata Yamada and Hirowatari, 2007, and P. aurantia sp. nov. Physopleurella aurantia sp. nov. differs from other con-geners in having the following combination of character states: antennal segment II about as long as the head width across the eyes, the apex of the cuneus narrowly darkened, and the paramere of the male genitalia slender, extending laterally from the pygophore and abruptly curving anteriad in its apical one-third. A revised key to Southeast Asian species of Physopleurella is provided.
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The family Anthocoridae (Hemiptera:Heteroptera) contains between 400 and 600 species distributed worldwide, chiefly on the continents but also on oceanic islands. They are small (1.4-4.5 mm) and common to a wide variety of habitats. Many are found in cryptic habitats such as galls, several widespread genera are surface feeders on small arthropods (Anthocoris, Orius, and Tetraphleps), and others can be found in ant nests and, especially, under bark. Wing polymorphism is common in this family, often associated with the cryptic habit. Most known species are predaceous, though some take plant food as well (e.g. Orius insidiosus, Orius pallidicornis). A few of these are believed to be entirely phytophagous (Paratriphleps laeviusculus). Their small size and often generalized feeding habits have resulted in about 30 introduced species, mostly accidental. A few have been introduced deliberately as biological control agents (Anthocoris spp., Montandoniola moraguesi, O. insidiosus, Orius tristicolor, and Tetraphleps spp.). Most nonindigenous species seem to have been distributed as a result of human activities, especially commerce. The predaceous habits of many Anthocoridae have attracted the attention of researchers who work in agroecosystems. Integrated pest management programs often include these predators, which has given us greater knowledge about these species than those found in natural ecosystems. Exciting discoveries about the attractiveness to these bugs of certain volatile plant and arthropod compounds are opening new areas of investigation into their chemical ecology. The reactions of these tiny predators will surely become better understood as a result.