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Abstract

The promotion of properly designed campaigns can help health providers to educate people and achieve a widespread knowledge of what cancer is, which will also avert risky behaviors and promote healthy lifestyles among the population. This is apt to reduce the probability of onset of the disease and to improve its discovery. This is a key issue in oncology, where early diagnosis and prevention are still major strategies in the fight against cancer. On the other hand, uncoordinated interventions do not offer adequate information nor do they promote effective health education. It is still unclear what the best ways are to address patients and healthy people when healthcare is involved, including also issues related to privacy or face-to-face versus computer-mediated consultations. The use of the information and communications technology (ICT) tools and web-driven technologies can help to promote health and prevent cancer, provided that accurate analyses of people’s awareness and sociocultural conditions are performed, and that correct information is given, allowing people to access reliable sources of information, possibly endorsed by centers of excellence in oncology, which could guarantee the trustworthiness of the content. The new media and the widespread use of communication devices can allow today and in the future the implementation of tailored health education, able to offer the correct information to the correct person, so that positive outcomes can eventually be achieved.

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