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Promoting healthy lifestyle for sustainable development

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Abstract

Economic growth, environment, and health are three significant aspects of sustainable development. Nowadays, lifestyle is increasingly evaluated as one of the most important factors influencing health. As increasing health expenditure is an important problem for sustainable development, it is essential to examine the society in terms of their health-related habits and promote healthy lifestyle to support sustainable development. In this chapter, healthy lifestyle of highly educated Istanbulites is researched. The respondents are classified into three distinct clusters according to their healthy lifestyles as "young and single individuals with low healthy lifestyle tendency." "young and middle-aged individuals consuming natural food," and "elderly, married adults leading healthy lifestyles." Afterwards, analyzing the data by ANOVA and post-hoc tests, it is found that respondents in different clusters have significantly different green consumer values and health motivations. Finally, theoretical and managerial discussions are provided and some recommendations are made for academicians and practitioners.
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Chapter 7
Promoting Healthy Lifestyle
for Sustainable Development
ABSTRACT
Economic growth, environment, and health are three significant aspects of sustainable development.
Nowadays, lifestyle is increasingly evaluated as one of the most important factors influencing health.
As increasing health expenditure is an important problem for sustainable development, it is essential to
examine the society in terms of their health-related habits and promote healthy lifestyle to support sus-
tainable development. In this chapter, healthy lifestyle of highly educated Istanbulites is researched. The
respondents are classified into three distinct clusters according to their healthy lifestyles as “young and
single individuals with low healthy lifestyle tendency.” “young and middle-aged individuals consuming
natural food,” and “elderly, married adults leading healthy lifestyles.” Afterwards, analyzing the data
by ANOVA and post-hoc tests, it is found that respondents in different clusters have significantly differ-
ent green consumer values and health motivations. Finally, theoretical and managerial discussions are
provided and some recommendations are made for academicians and practitioners.
INTRODUCTION
1970s social marketing and green marketing
schools strengthened the relation between market-
ing and natural environment. As the concept of
sustainability became widespread, the number of
consumers preferring products that won’t harm the
environment and their health, increased to a great
extent. These consumers are sensitive about their
health as well as the health of their environment.
LOHAS (Lifestyle of Health and Sustainability),
which is one of the latest approaches about life-
style, brings a consumer segment who care about
consumer health, environment, social justice
and sustainable living (Cohen, 2010). Thus, it is
impossible to take the concept of sustainability
regardless from healthy lifestyle.
As the main focus of this study is the issue of
attaining sustainable development through pro-
moting healthy lifestyle, it is important to define the
Filiz Bozkurt
Dou University, Turkey
Ahu Ergen
Bahçeehir University, Turkey
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-6635-1.ch007
... Contrary to the definitions above, Camilleri, (2017b) stated that the concept of CSR is being challenged by those who want the corporations to move beyond transparency, ethical behaviour and stakeholder engagement. Nonetheless, there are four different categories for CSR that include ethical responsibility, philanthropic responsibility, environmental responsibility and economic responsibility (see Figure 2) or what could be combined under the 'triple-bottom-line' (TBL) approach that achieves a balance of economic, environmental and social imperatives, while at the same time addresses the expectations of shareholders and stakeholders (Bozkurt & Ergen, 2015). The TBL is also an approach tied closely to financial reporting as it extends it further to performance reporting on sustainable development, such as the use of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) standards (GR1, n.d.). ...
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