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Kudos: Promoting the reach and impact of published research

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Kudos: Promoting the reach and impact of published research

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In order to ensure that the high quality work of your research, reaches the widest possible audience. You need tools to disseminate the research findings and publications. Kudos is one of the service that provides tools for researchers to maximize the visibility and reach of their published papers. Kudos provides a new way for authors to use social media to engage the digital community with their research. By creating ’profiles’ for their published articles and adding short titles, lay summaries, impact statements and supplementary content, authors can make their articles more engaging for a digital readership.
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Kudos: Promoting the
reach and impact of
published research
aleebrahim@um.edu.my
@aleebrahim
www.researcherid.com/rid/C-2414-2009
http://scholar.google.com/citations
Nader Ale Ebrahim, PhD
Visiting Research Fellow
Research Support Unit
Centre for Research Services
Research Management & Innovation Complex
University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
16th March 2016
3rd SERIES OF INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOP ON:
Strategies to Enhance Research
Visibility, Impact & Citations
Nader Ale Ebrahim, PhD
=====================================
Research Support Unit
Centre for Research Services
Research Management & Innovation Complex
University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
www.researcherid.com/rid/C-2414-2009
http://scholar.google.com/citations
Read more: Ale Ebrahim, N., Salehi, H., Embi, M. A., Habibi Tanha, F., Gholizadeh, H., Motahar, S. M., & Ordi, A. (2013). Effective
Strategies for Increasing Citation Frequency. International Education Studies, 6(11), 93-99. doi: 10.5539/ies.v6n11p93
Available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.3114625
Abstract
Abstract: In order to ensure that the high quality work of your
research, reaches the widest possible audience. You need tools
to disseminate the research findings and publications. Kudos is
one of the service that provides tools for researchers to
maximize the visibility and reach of their published papers.
Kudos provides a new way for authors to use social media to
engage the digital community with their research. By creating
'profiles' for their published articles and adding short titles, lay
summaries, impact statements and supplementary content,
authors can make their articles more engaging for a digital
readership.
Keywords: H-index, Improve citations, Research tools,
Bibliometrics, KUDOS, Research impact, Research Visibility
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Strategies for Enhancing the Impact of Research
Improving access and retrieval of your research
study is the surest way to enhance its impact.
Repetition, consistency, and an awareness of
the intended audience form the basis of most the
following strategies.
Preparing for Publication
Dissemination
Keeping Track of Your Research
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Source: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis Missouri
Authors cite a work because:
It is relevant (in some way) to
what they’re writing
They know it exists
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Source: Gosling, C. (2013). Tips for improving citations 2nd Bibliometrics in Libraries Meeting: The Open University.
Disseminate Publications
(Advertising)
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
8
Overload of information
Growth curve for number of articles published per annum
Chart based on 3.26% pa growth in article numbers,the lower limit proposed by Mabe and Amin
in „Growth dynamics of scholarly and scientific journals”. Scientometrics, 51:1 (2001) 147162
Published research articles are doubling every
twenty years
but readers’ time is not doubling!
Increased access
=
Increased downloads
=
Increased citations
=
Increased impact!
Source: Rosarie Coughlan, (August 2011) Enhance the Visibility & Impact of Your Research-9 Simple Tips”,
Accountancy Librarian, Concordia University
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Impact requires visibility
Source: Melinda Kenneway, Kudos (2015) Whose work is it anyway? Helping researchers maximize reach and impact of their work
Numbers are
GREAT
but what’s the
impact of the
research?
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Source: Finding Insights in ALMS for Research Evaluation. Posted on November 20, 2013 by PLoS Admin
33-Use all “Enhancing Visibility and
Impacttools
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Research Tools Mind Map:
Networking
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
KUDOS puts researchers
in the driving seat
tools to improve the impact of their work
Source: Melinda Kenneway, Kudos (2015) Whose work is it anyway? Helping researchers maximize reach and impact of their work
14 Week Pilot in 2013
19% higher
article usage per day
for articles shared using the Kudos tools
compared to the control group
Source: Melinda Kenneway, Kudos (2015) Whose work is it anyway? Helping researchers maximize reach and impact of their work
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Institutional partners
Source: Charlie Rapple, Co-Founder Kudos (2015) Increasing the reach and impact of published research
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Emerald extends partnership with Kudos
after authors benefit from record pilot
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
50+ publisher partners
Source: Charlie Rapple, Co-Founder Kudos (2015) Increasing the reach and impact of published research
What is Kudos? An Interview with David Sommer, Co-Founder
The idea for Kudos was born at the ALPSP (Association of
Learned and Professional Society Publishers) conference in
2012 when Melinda Kenneway and Charlie Rapple (both from
TBI Communications) and David Sommer, Co-Founder sat
down and started talking about the challenges that face
academic researchers today.
Kudos pilot phase was until Dec 2013.
Kudos is available for authors of published research from any
field
Kudos is well positioned to support the scholarly publishing
process and help authors become more efficient and effective
at communicating their works to maximize the reach and
impact of their research.
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Source: http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2013/12/17/what-is-kudos-an-interview-with-david-sommer-co-founder/
Launched May 2014
30,000+ researcher registrations
1,000+ new registrations weekly
300,000+ publications claimed
Free for authors to use
Source: Melinda Kenneway, Kudos (2015) Whose work is it anyway? Helping researchers maximize reach and impact of their work
?
Mentions
Shares
Bookmarks
Views
Clicks
Downloads
Citations
Traditional
media
How do you know what
effect your efforts to
share your work
are having on its
performance?
connects the dots!
Source: Charlie Rapple, Co-Founder Kudos (2015) Increasing the reach and impact of published research
How Kudos is different sharing
Create a
profile
Connect
publications to
related
resources
Share research
Broaden
engagement
with research
View a range
of metrics
Manage
multiple
comms
channels
Map actions
against
metrics
Understand how
to maximize
reach and impact
Kudos
ORCID,
ResearchGate
,
Academia.edu
Google Scholar,
Scopus
Institutional
repository, CRIS
Altmetric
,
Impact Story,
Plum Analytics
YouTube, Flickr,
Slideshare, Figshare
VIVO, Incend
,
ResearchFish
Twitter, Facebook,
LinkedIn,
Google+
ResearchMedia
, The
Conversation,
Futurity, Bulletin,
Publiscize
Source: Charlie Rapple, Co-Founder Kudos (2015) Increasing the reach and impact of published research
How Kudos compares to other services
The Kudos workflow
Kudos provides an independent, cross-publisher platform for
researchers to explain and share their work with wider audiences, and
to measure the impact this has on downloads, citations and altmetrics.
There are four simple stages involved for authors to achieve this:
Explain Explain publications by adding plain language short titles and lay
summaries, and by highlighting what makes the work important; this serves to boost
discoverability
Enrich Enrich articles by adding links to related resources (including videos, slides,
data, etc.) that will help put author research in context
Share Share publications by email and social media. Kudos will also share content
and links with other discovery channels to maximise reach
Measure Measure the impact on article performance against an array of metrics,
including downloads, citations and altmetrics, providing a comprehensive picture of a
specific article’s success
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Source: http://www.future-science-group.com/kudos/
EXPLAIN SHARE MEASURE
Researcher
toolkit
Source: Charlie Rapple, Co-Founder Kudos (2015) Increasing the reach and impact of published research
Step 1: Explain your publications
Adding a short title to your publications will help make them easier to find and can help increase
citations. Make the title specific, descriptive, concise, and comprehensible to a broad range of
readers. Studies show that the construction of an article title has a significant impact on how
frequently the paper is cited [1]. Studies also show articles with short titles can be more
highly cited [2].
Adding a simple, non-technical explanation (lay summary) of your publication will make it easier
to find, and more accessible to a broader audience. Adding an explanation of what is most unique
and/or timely about your work (impact statement), and the difference it might make, will also help
increase readership.
Kudos will deposit this additional information about your article with a range of discovery
services, all linking back to your publication, to ensure it is even easier to find, read and cite.
Useful resources to help you write lay summaries and impact statements:
http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/how-guides/write-lay-summary
http://www2.ncri.org.uk/ctrad/documents/ctrad_how_to_write_a_good_lay_summary_nov_2012.pdf
http://blogs.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/2011/06/15/writing-a-lay-summary-is-easy-right/
http://www.southampton.ac.uk/ris/funding/impact.html
http://www.sfi.ie/funding/sfi-research-impact/impact-statements/what-makes-a-good-impact-statement.html
http://agsci.oregonstate.edu/research/writingimpacts
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Source: https://www.growkudos.com/about/improve-my-results
Authors write a short title, lay summary and
impact statement.
Source: Melinda Kenneway, Kudos (2015) Whose work is it anyway? Helping researchers maximize reach and impact of their work
Step 2: Enrich your publications
Link your publications to related resources such as images,
videos, blogs, data sets etc. These additional resources also
help give readers a broader view of your work and can help
increase citations.
Studies that made data available in a public repository
received 9% more citations than similar studies for which
the data was not made available. Publicly available data
was significantly (p=0.006) associated with a 69% increase in
citations, independently of journal impact factor, date of
publication, and author country of origin using linear
regression [3]. Evidence also exists from individual publishers
that linking videos to articles can increase downloads.
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Source: https://www.growkudos.com/about/improve-my-results
Authors link related materials to their article,
book or book chapter.
Source: Melinda Kenneway, Kudos (2015) Whose work is it anyway? Helping researchers maximize reach and impact of their work
Step 3: Share your publications
Sharing your publications by email and social media can
significantly increase usage and citations. For example,
one study showed that highly tweeted articles are 11
times more likely to be highly cited than less tweeted
articles [4].
Significant evidence also exists that promoting individual
articles generally positively impacts on publication
performance. One study showed that the difference in
citation count for promoted articles versus non-
promoted articles can still be observed for more than 3
years post publication [5].
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Source: https://www.growkudos.com/about/improve-my-results
Authors share links to their publications by email
and through social media.
SHARE
Source: Melinda Kenneway, Kudos (2015) Whose work is it anyway? Helping researchers maximize reach and impact of their work
Authors can track the impact of this against
a wide range of metrics.
MEASURE
Source: Melinda Kenneway, Kudos (2015) Whose work is it anyway? Helping researchers maximize reach and impact of their work
import the citations from ORCID into your
Kudos
First sign in to Kudos and select “Manage Account” from
the My Tools drop down menu. Then, simply click the
“create or connect your ORCID iD” button. Once your
ORCID iD is connected to your Kudos account, Kudos
can retrieve the list of publications you have added to
your ORCID record and those you add in the future.
These publications will appear on your “My Profile” page
on Kudos.
If you haven’t associated any publications with your
ORCID record yet please create your ORCID publication
list. See “How do I create my ORCID publication list?” for
further information.
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Source: https://www.growkudos.com/about/orcid
import the citations from ORCID into your
Kudos
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
import the citations from ORCID into your
Kudos
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
SHARE
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
MEASURE
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Virtual R&D Teams: A New Model for
Product Development
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Virtual R&D Teams: A New Model for
Product Development
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Virtual R&D Teams: A New Model for
Product Development
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Virtual R&D Teams: A New Model for
Product Development
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
My recent publications
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
Questions?
E-mail: aleebrahim@um.edu.my
Twitter: @aleebrahim
www.researcherid.com/rid/C-2414-2009
http://scholar.google.com/citations
Nader Ale Ebrahim, PhD
=====================================
Research Support Unit
Centre for Research Services
Research Management & Innovation Complex
University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
www.researcherid.com/rid/C-2414-2009
http://scholar.google.com/citations
RESEARCH SUPPORT UNIT (RSU)
CENTRE FOR RESEARCH SERVICES
RESEARCH MANAGEMENT & INNOVATION COMPLEX (IPPP)
UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
References
1. Charlie Rapple, Co-Founder Kudos (2015) Increasing the reach and impact of published research
2. The impact of article titles on citation hits: an analysis of general and specialist medical journals JRSM Short Reports. Thomas S Jacques, Neil J Sebire (2010), doi:
10.1258/shorts.2009.100020 http://dx.doi.org/10.1258/shorts.2009.100020
3. Articles with short titles describing the results are cited more oftenCarlos Eduardo Paiva,I,,II João Paulo da Silveira Nogueira Lima,I and Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro
PaivaII Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2012 May; 67(5): 509 513, doi: 10.6061/clinics/2012(05)17 http://dx.doi.org/10.6061/clinics/2012(05)17
4. Sharing Detailed Research Data Is Associated with Increased Citation Rate. Heather A. Piwowar, Roger S. Day, Douglas B. Fridsma (2007). PLoS ONE. Published:
March 21, 2007. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0000308 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0000308; Data reuse and the open data citation advantage. Heather
Piwowar, Todd J Vision (2013). https://peerj.com/preprints/1/
5. Can Tweets Predict Citations? Metrics of Social Impact Based on Twitter and Correlation with Traditional Metrics of Scientific Impact, Gunther Eysenbach. Journal of
Medical Internet Research. doi: 10.2196/jmir.2012 http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/jmir.2012
6. Importance of the lay press in the transmission of medical knowledge to the scientific community, Phillips, D.P., Kanter, E.J., Bednarczyk, B., and Tastad, P.T. 1991.
New England Journal of Medicine, 325: 11801183. doi: 10.1056/NEJM199110173251620 http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199110173251620
7. Müller, A. M., Ansari, P., Ale Ebrahim, N., & Khoo, S. (2015). Physical Activity and Aging Research: A Bibliometric Analysis. Journal Of Aging And Physical Activity In
Press. doi:10.1123/japa.2015-0188
8. Ale Ebrahim, N. (2015). Virtual R&D Teams: A New Model for Product Development. International Journal of Innovation, 3(2), 1-27. :
http://dx.doi.org/10.5585/iji.v3i2.43
9. Rakhshandehroo, M., Yusof, M. J. M., Ale Ebrahim, N., Sharghi, A., & Arabi, R. (2015). 100 Most Cited Articles in Urban Green and Open Spaces: A Bibliometric
Analysis. Current World Environment, 10(2), 1-16. doi:10.6084/m9.figshare.1509863 http://ssrn.com/abstract=2643922
10. Maghami, M., Navabi Asl, S., Rezadad, M. i., Ale Ebrahim, N., & Gomes, C. (2015). Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Solar hydrogen Generation Literature
From 2001 to 2014. Scientometrics 105(2), 759-771. : http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11192-015-1730-3
11. Growth dynamics of scholarly and scientific journals”. Scientometrics, 51:1 (2001) 147162
12. Melinda Kenneway, Kudos (2015) Whose work is it anyway? Helping researchers maximize reach and impact
of their work
13. Ale Ebrahim, N. (2016). Maximizing Articles Citation Frequency. Retrieved from Research Support Unit, Centre for Research Services, Institute of Research
Management and Monitoring (IPPP)”, University of Malaya: https://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1572226.v2
14. Ale Ebrahim, N. (2016). Procedure to write a Bibliometrics paper. Retrieved from Computer Lab, Level 3, Academy of Islamic Studies, University of Malaya, Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia: http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.3032332
15. Ale Ebrahim, N. (2016). Research Tools: Enhancing visibility and impact of the research. Retrieved from Computer Lab, Level 2, Institute of Graduate Studies,
University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.2794237
16. Ale Ebrahim, N. (2016). Publish online magazine to promote publications and research findings. Retrieved from Research Support Unit, Centre for Research Services,
Institute of Research Management and Monitoring (IPPP)”, University of Malaya: https://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.2069559.v1
©2016-2017 Nader Ale Ebrahim
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
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Results are presented on journal growth dynamics at both the micro and macro levels, showingthat journal development clearly follows researcher behaviour and growth characteristics. At thesubject discipline level, the journal system is highly responsive to research events. Overall journalgrowth characteristics clearly show the predominance of 3.3% compound annual growth under anumber of different socio-political climates. It is proposed that this represents a lower limit tojournal growth rates and that this growth is the outcome of a self-organizing information systemthat reflects on the growth and specialization of knowledge. Potential models are suggested whichcould form attractive theoretical further lines of enquiry.