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The Innovation Dilemma and the Consolidation of Autocratic Regimes

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The Innovation Dilemma and the Consolidation of Autocratic Regimes

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Abstract

Christian Gael, The Innovation Dilemma and the Consolidation of Autocratic Regimes, pp. 132-156. Despite the obvious (though as of yet unclear) relationship between economic growth and the persistence of autocratic regimes, there are only few studies that examine how innovation processes affect autocracies - and vice versa. Linking the scholarship on authoritarian consolidation with insights from the National Innovation Systems- and Science and Technology Studies literature, this article argues that processes of innovation in autocracies initiate social, economic and political processes that force a regime to constantly improve its institutional structures and enhance its channels into society. This consolidation of authoritarian rule in turn benefits further innovation. As a comparison of China and Myanmar will illustrate, this strategy can enhance a regime's legitimacy, but is a difficult and risky process. As a result, many regimes instead choose to uphold their rule by relying on repression.

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... Во-вторых, э-участие затрагивает не только проблему участия граждан, но и роли инноваций, в частности, Интернета в динамике авторитарного режима. Это еще один повод задуматься, является ли он «технологией освобождения» [22] или инструментом авторитарного контроля [31]. Хотя э-участие и контролируется государством, для его дальнейшего развития нужен Интернет, а значит открываются возможности для мобилизации [66]. ...
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