ArticlePDF Available

Abstract and Figures

Welcome to the third in a series of research reports from Leadership South West, the regional Centre of Excellence in leadership, based at the Centre for Leadership Studies, University of Exeter. This report builds on from the last one, ‘What is leadership development: purpose and practice’, which explored the range of approaches to leadership development available to individuals and organisations and the assumptions and principles that underlie them. This is done by considering the impact of context on the appropriate content, style and format of leadership development. The report is divided into two main sections. The first looks at how different organisational and individual priorities shape the content and format of leadership development. Thus, for example, what are the sorts of things an organisation needs to pay attention to when embarking on a process of strategic change? What is distinct about development initiatives targeted at different client groups (e.g. women managers, senior executives)? And how can topics such as ethics and self-awareness be effectively conveyed within leadership development? The second section takes more of a sector/occupational focus on leadership development, looking at what tend to be the most significant factors and challenges facing organisations in these different environments. Thus, for example, what is distinct about the police or military context and what types of intervention seem best placed for organisations of this type? What are the key issues for leaders in local government and/or the education sector and how can leadership development help? And what are the main issues when dealing with people from different occupational groups and how can they best be engaged? The report concludes with a summary of themes arising from the different sections and an integrated framework for leadership development. South West Regional Skills Partnership
: A model for leadership development Contextual Awareness : This aspect is a recognition that leadership is situated in a particular context. The nature of the business, its strategic imperatives, the capabilities and motivations of colleagues and team members, relationship with one’s boss - all these and many other factors will have an impact on how one should lead. This recognition strongly argues against notions of a single list of leadership characteristics which are universally applicable, although the context may well include a set of behaviours or characteristics identified by the organisation as preferable. These should be included in the contextual consideration rather than assumed to be definitive. Pedler, Burgoyne and Boydell have developed a slightly different three aspect model (2001) which also takes as its starting point the significance of context in leadership, a factor in their view of the challenges of leadership. As will be discussed below this contextual aspect of leadership can be effectively developed through project based action learning often supplemented by appropriate business education. Awareness of self : This aspect is based on an assumption about leadership which is that it is an expression of self. A clear distinction the author makes between leadership and management is that management is largely role based and includes many necessary activities, such as setting objectives and performance reviews. Leadership, in contrast, is a way of being, an expression of characteristics such as enthusiasm, belief, vulnerability, reliability, clarity of purpose which
… 
Content may be subject to copyright.
A preview of the PDF is not available
... Interest in effective leadership development has been coming to enhancement in both profitable and non-profitable organizations (Avolio, 2004;Avolio and Gardner, 2005;Avolio et al., 2010;Bolden, 2006;Day, 2001). On the other hand, the literature on leadership development and its impact has been noticed little and most of the leadership development studies have less been noticed to be empirical (Collins, 2002). ...
... From the Admiral Nurse's viewpoint there is a clear recognition that all members of the group, including the facilitator, have beliefs and attitudes that can influence the whole and that self-awareness is key to managing oneself and encouraging positive behaviours in others (Bolden, 2006). This realisation can help when feelings of self-doubt or uncertainty begin to emerge, enabling freer expression of thoughts and fears. ...
... Some research suggests that womenonly development programmes have no proven benefits other than functioning as a support network [19]. Other research suggests that although women-only development programme are useful early on in women's careers, as they move on into senior roles it is more beneficial for them to participate in mixed gender development programmes [27]. ...
Article
This study sought to examine the stimulating influence of management development on workers' efficiency of the insurance industry in Rivers State. Correctional research design was applied. The Krejcie and Morgan sample size determination table was employed in a bid to determine the sample size. Hence, the sample size is fifty-six; 27 managers and 28 supervisors drawn from the population size of 62 from the 10 insurance companies under review. The outcome of the analysis led to the finding that experiential learning, management training, and technology has significant effects on workers’ efficiency. The Spearman’ Rank Order Correlation Coefficient was used via the aid of Statistical Package for Social Sciences. It was recommended that: Experiential learning should be encouraged as it gives room for critical thinking, enhances problem solving and increases decision making skills which will translate into workers' efficiency for the insurance companies. Management should be consistent with having management trainings as this will help boost employees’ confidence, while creating the ability of the trainee to implement company strategies and mitigate avoidable damages that could result in workers' inefficiency. Technology should be introduced into management development as will improve existing processes, while revealing newer ways to accomplish tasks with the aim of harnessing the potentials of the employees despite seeking workers’ efficiency.
Article
Full-text available
Executive summary to the interim report, October 2006; full text of the final report may be downloaded free from LFHE website but registration is required Leadership Foundation for Higher Education
Article
Full-text available
This chapter presents a conceptual refiguration of action-research based on a "sociorationalist" view of science. The position that is developed can be summarized as follows: For action-research to reach its potential as a vehicle for social innovation it needs to begin advancing theoretical knowledge of consequence; that good theory may be one of the best means human beings have for affecting change in a postindustrial world; that the discipline's steadfast commitment to a problem-solving view of the world acts as a primary constraint on its imagination and contribution to knowledge; that appreciative inquiry represents a viable complement to conventional forms of action-research; and finally, that through our assumptions and choice of method we largely create the world we later discover.
Article
Full-text available
This article indicates how the competency approach to leadership could be conceived of as a repeating refrain that continues to offer an illusory promise to rationalize and simplify the processes of selecting, measuring and developing leaders, yet only reflects a fragment of the complexity that is leadership. To make this argument we draw on two sets of data: a review of leadership competency frameworks and an analysis of participant reports from a reflective leadership development programme. A lexical analysis comparing the two data sets highlights a substantial difference with regards to the relative importance placed on the moral, emotional and relationship dimensions of leadership. The implications of these differences are considered, as are ways in which the competency approach could be aligned more closely with the current and future needs of leaders and organizations. In particular, we argue that a more discursive approach that helps to reveal and challenge underlying organizational assumptions is likely to be more beneficial if organizations are looking to move beyond individualistic notions of leadership towards more inclusive and collective forms. Methodological issues are also raised around the comparative analysis (both semantic and linguistic) of apparently incommensurable texts.
Article
Full-text available
Contemporary universities, serving mass higher education markets, find themselves delivering complex, broadly based projects such as student support and welfare, human resource development, and business enterprise. Established concepts of academic administration and devolved management have been overlaid by more fluid institutional structures and cultures, with a softening of internal and external boundaries (Whitchurch, 200434. Whitchurch , C. 2004. Administrative managers—A critical link.. Higher Education Quarterly, 58(4): 280–298. [CrossRef]View all references, 200535. Whitchurch , C. 2005. “Administrators or managers? The shifting roles and identities of professional administrators and managers in UK higher education.”. In From mass to universal higher education., Edited by: McNay , I (Ed.) . pp. 119–208. Buckingham: SRHE/Open University Press. In View all references). These developments have caused major shifts in the identities of professional administrators and managers as they adopt more project‐oriented roles crossing functional and organisational boundaries. This paper considers the dynamics of these changes, in terms that move beyond conventional assumptions about administration and management. While identities have been defined traditionally via structured domains such as professional knowledges, institutional boundaries, and the policy requirements of the higher education sector, an emergent project domain has fostered the development of an increasingly multi‐professional grouping of staff, with implications for career futures.
Book
Alex Haslam has thoroughly revised and updated his ground-breaking original text with this new edition. While still retaining the highly readable and engaging style of the best-selling First Edition, the author presents extensive reviews and critiques of major topics in organizational psychology - including leadership, motivation, communication, decision making, negotiation, power, productivity and collective action - in this thoroughly revised edition. New to the Second Edition: An entirely new chapter on organizational stress which deals with highly topical issues of stress appraisal, social support, coping and burnout.; New, wider textbook format and design making the entire book much more accessible for students.; A wide range of pedagogical features are included - suggestions for further reading at the end of each chapter and comprehensive glossaries of social identity, social psychological and organizational terms
Article
What could be harder than turning around a seemingly wildly successful company by imposing a centralized framework on a heretofore radically decentralized, anti-establishment, free-spirited organization? That was the challenge GE alumnus Robert Nardelli faced when he abruptly succeeded Home Depot's popular founders, Bernie Marcus and Arthur Blank, as the top executive in December 2000. Talk about a shock: No one expected Marcus and Blank, both in their fifties, to leave. And, as Nardelli himself acknowledges, the last thing anyone wanted was an outsider who would "GE-ize their company and culture." But despite its glossy high-growth exterior, Home Depot was standing on shaky financial footings. Rapid expansion had stretched cash flow, inventory turns, profits, and store manager ranks thin. Each store's vaunted independence was making the company as a whole highly inflexible, unable to take advantage of economies of scale. What so effectively got Home Depot from zero to $50 billion in sales wasn't going to get it to the next $50 billion. The story of the vision, strategy, and leadership skills Nardelli used to move Home Depot to the next level has been told. But vision, strategy, and leadership alone - while necessary - are not enough. Typically, culture change is unsystematic and, when it works, is based on the charisma of the person leading the change, Charan says. "But Home Depot shows - in perhaps the best example I have seen in my 30-year career - that a cultural transition can be achieved systematically." In this article, Charan lays out the panoply of tools that, wielded in a coordinated and systematic fashion, enabled Home Depot to get a grip on its freewheeling culture so that the company could reap - and sustain - the advantages inherent in its size. Many an up-and-coming company would do well to look to this model to gain similar advantage when the time comes to exchange the thrill of entrepreneurial spirit for the strength of established power.